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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maris View Post
    I agree. cliveh asks so many questions that I wonder what he does with the answers. Does he covet them to inform and enhance his personal photographic work? Is he a teacher who unselfishly shares the wisdom of many with his students? Is there a intellectual treatise in the offing; a book perhaps? Is he polling photographic opinion to discover who agrees with his secret agenda?

    The cliveh threads are a treasure trove of accumulated APUG though and if he were to offer a synopsis of his discoveries that would be a valuable contribution to photographic scholarship.

    As for trees, they are the same as any other subject matter: visual metaphors for abstract ideas. A broken tree stands for dissolution and change, a straight one for strength and assertiveness, a bent and weathered one for resilience in the face of adversity; and so it goes.
    Maris, can you give me a link to your website, as I would like to view your images.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12

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    hi cliveh

    i think it all depends ..
    some people work better after contemplating
    or studying, or having a deeper understanding of something
    it is like making a portrait of an old friend or family member
    as opposed to a stranger ...

    some people work better by letting whatever it is they are photographing
    hit them all at once.

    i work better the 2nd way ... the longer i am somewhere pondering, contemplating
    the less i feel connected to my subject ... just like i find it way more difficult to photograph
    someone i know ... a stranger to me is much easier, AND there are no expectations ...
    maybe contemplation leads to expectations as well

  3. #13
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maris View Post

    As for trees, they are the same as any other subject matter: visual metaphors for abstract ideas. A broken tree stands for dissolution and change, a straight one for strength and assertiveness, a bent and weathered one for resilience in the face of adversity; and so it goes.
    . . . and a clearfell coupe?

  5. #15
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    Yes indeed until they take you away to a rubber room on the funny farm
    Ben

  6. #16
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    It is possible that someone could walk up to a tree you have been contemplating for hours on end, plant himself over your shoulder and take a photograph that is as "meaningful" as the one you happen to snap at that moment. Possible, but not probable. The more you study your subject, the more aware you become of its subtleties, which can influence your resulting photograph in many ways.

    Furthermore, contemplation of "trees" (if that is your subject, or fences, mountains, rocks, etc.) can give you insight into how that subject speaks to you, and how that subject can speak through your lens. You needn't consider a particular tree, nor even actually be present to consider it. You can let your mind explore the trees you have known and/or imagined. You can contemplate what draws you to the subject, what you find appealing, what you hope to catch in your lens. This can give you insight into how to approach your subject when you encounter it, camera in hand.

    Before you dismiss this as just so much hooey, consider that unless you are one of those fortunate persons who can take a flawless photograph by chance, understanding your subject is a vital step towards knowing how to photograph it.

    Cheers,
    Tom
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    IMO, analyzing is the opposite of contemplation.
    Point taken and agreed...........I'll use over contemplate.

  8. #18
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    The only problem of over-contemplating is one might get so mellow that one never gets around to setting the camera up...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    All I know is that there are a lot of trees in my negatives and slides (see my APUG gallery) so I expect that I have done a fair amount of contemplation of trees.

    Seeing and contemplation go well together, and seeing is an integral part of meaningful photography.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    ...Seeing and contemplation go well together, and seeing is an integral part of meaningful photography.
    Some folks just are not contempative type people, yet can still make meaningful prints...just a different type of meaning is all.

    I photograph light, so that is what I am contemplating as I wander under the redwoods. Hopefully others can see that in my photographs. But some people are very wrapped up rationality, in the concrete, and do not/cannot appreciate contemplative images. That's cool...it is our differences that make the world interesting.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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