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  1. #31
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    ...I think snappers are more open to the Zen experience.
    I will disagree with this only because not-thinking is as far away from the "Zen experience" as over-thinking.

    It is the decision to make or not make an image -- and the mental gymnastics one may or may not do to reach that decision -- that defines the "Zen experience". It is not the speed in which one goes about making the image, once the decision is made. In The Art of Zen Archery, it is how the arrow is released that matters, not the speed in which one draws and fires.

    Otherwise, one is just using the shotgun affect by snapping away. So my point is that even when one takes 30 minutes to set up a 8x10 camera and expose a sheet of film, that image has as much of a possibility of being in a "Zen experience" as one might have exposing 36 exposures in 10 minutes with a 35mm.

    Both have the potential of spontinatity. (sorry for the sp).

    Vaughn
    Last edited by Vaughn; 03-09-2012 at 12:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #32
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn
    ...my point is that even when one takes 30 minutes to set up a 8x10 camera and expose a sheet of film, that image has as much of a possibility of being in a "Zen experience" as one might have exposing 36 exposures in 10 minutes with a 35mm.
    At least they'd be using the same amount of film area...

    Your comment is well spoken. To me Zen seems to be more about balance and enlightenment.
    Whatever task is undertaken, enough effort and contemplation is applied. It's a way of being, a lifestyle if you will, acting upon life's inclinations with wisdom.
    Like you, I don't think it has anything to do with what type of camera is used, but rather that A camera is used, and you use it in a way that suits the task at hand.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #33

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    Well Susan Sontag and her reasoning that 'taking' photographs is an aggressive act, is backed up by the 'snapper' mentality that digital photography encourages. I would have thought this is the biggest reason many here choose to shoot... ahem, I mean 'make' photographs on film?

    I've always thought it important to consider my relationship to the subject before photographing it, rather than being a paparazi. The snapping away in my mind clearly defines those traditional practitioners as more concerned with quickly getting home to play with chemistry, rather than making compelling photographs. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but don't ever call yourself an artist if it's the case!

    And Cartier-Bresson wasn't a snapper, he was just quicker at seeing well!

  4. #34
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    I snap, shoot, take, make, steal, and lie to get photographs.

    I've seen snapshots that are technically, and artistically better than a lot of the drivel I see in galleries and museums. Naturally that is the .1% exception, rather than the rule, but I think everyone has a different methodology to shooting. I behave differently on a day to day basis. Sometimes I breeze through 36 exposures in two or three hours, other times a roll will sit in a camera for a few weeks, being used for one or two frames a day.

    I also use my Hasselblads as "snapshot" (whatever the hell such a murky term means...) cameras though, so what do I know.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  5. #35
    zsas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    It is the decision to make or not make an image -- and the mental gymnastics one may or may not do to reach that decision -- that defines the "Zen experience". It is not the speed in which one goes about making the image, once the decision is made. In The Art of Zen Archery, it is how the arrow is released that matters, not the speed in which one draws and fires.
    Agree! Putting terms as how it is done has possibility of spawning "format wars", where folks who are LF vs say 35 square off and the HCB gets thrown in there and none of it makes any sense. Take photographs, how ever one wishes, and call it a day
    Andy

  6. #36
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    Agree! Putting terms as how it is done has possibility of spawning "format wars", where folks who are LF vs say 35 square off and the HCB gets thrown in there and none of it makes any sense. Take photographs, how ever one wishes, and call it a day
    ^^^ What he said.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  7. #37
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Who brought Zen into this?

    Zen can also mean enjoying being hit across the shoulders as that gets the blood circulating again and yearning for the bell so I can move for a few minutes and the hope dawn will start soon and we can have breakfast
    Last edited by John Austin; 03-09-2012 at 03:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #38
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Blame the Maine Coon.

  9. #39
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I will disagree with this only because not-thinking is as far away from the "Zen experience" as over-thinking.
    a possibility of being in a "Zen experience" as one might have exposing 36 exposures in 10 minutes with a 35mm.

    Both have the potential of spontinatity. (sorry for the sp).

    Vaughn
    I like the spelling of spontaneity - I won't say why, but it does make me think of unexpected joys

    This morning is not one of joy, I am battling with my neg scanner, lifted from a friends rubbish bin, and deciding the only way to get a reasonable result is to make 10x8 prints of these negs and scan them for a client - I digress, but as digression is one of the things I am good at I will continue

  10. #40
    Maris's Avatar
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    To borrow Minor White's idea I'm always photographing everything mentally. After some decades at this game I can form a pretty reliable mental image of the final picture as it would emerge from the darkroom. If it's no good I'll go and look at something else. Just snapping, just burning film, to see what things look like when photographed (thanks Gary Winogrand) is a lazy alternative to thinking the process through in the first place. And later discovering some twee frames in a pile of contact sheets is no salvation.

    Snappers like Friedlander, Winogrand, and Cartier-Bresson, who never stopped and looked at what was in front of them, never pondered it, and never knew exactly what was on the film until they winnowed the contact sheets ask what I cannot give: To put through my mind stuff they didn't bother putting through theirs.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

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