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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hikari View Post
    These posts sound to me more about sour grapes that any legitimate opinion. Get over it, some people have different ideas and they have gone out and developed a career doing this. If you want to curate photography, go out and earn that place too.
    I think the fact that this discussion has arisen sugests that there is a problem and if I could just get over it, there would be no need to voice my opinion. But I feel we're living in a world where the young artist is forced to take a position, rather than follow his personal intuition. This is my dilemma and I believe that of many others.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    I think the fact that this discussion has arisen sugests that there is a problem and if I could just get over it, there would be no need to voice my opinion. But I feel we're living in a world where the young artist is forced to take a position, rather than follow his personal intuition. This is my dilemma and I believe that of many others.
    That is not an argument. Because you do not like the way things are, which is really how things have always been, then you decide to call it an issue. That sounds a lot like what you are complaining about. BTW, you started this "discussion."

  3. #43

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    Perhaps things have always been this way. Thanks for contributing Hikari, appreciate it.

  4. #44

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    batwister, let close friends be your curators and patronus. Its ok to live in your own bubble. Venture out to MoMA as a tourist, to see how the foreigners live. Then there is no dilemma at all, you create for yourself and those who appreciate what you say.

    Appreciate Gursky as an artifact of continental atheism much as you would a temple to Jupiter.

    Being in a bubble will improve your life, don't dismiss it. Much of the world is ugly, boring and wrong. And you won't change it. Build something new instead. Import only what you like from the outside.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    First of all, the clutter and shallow DoF images I've been trying to delete since I joined the forum! Don't know what's going on there. Uploaded as an amateur's contributions, not artistic statements. I can only say I've come a long way in the last couple of years. As awful as the images are, your defining the portrait by the aperture used is perhaps more revealing of your own concerns. Although I'd have to agree if you're insinuating that centrally composed portraits at f2.8 are a trademark of the Hasselblad amateur!

    To the point, I'd only hope that photographers aren't tailoring their work for gallery's tastes. I've never believed successful artists when they've said "I don't think about the audience', don't patronise me! Their prints would never leave the house if this was true. But... what I see in contemporary photography are hoards of conformists and it doesn't take a nitpicker to make this observation. Even the pictorialists, f/64 and New Topographics had very definite individual concerns and these were essentially photography cults! What I see today is the cult of fashion, where the individual is ostracized, not only for his sense of aesthetic, but perhaps because he doesn't have an artist's trench coat and haircut.

    Todd Hido, whose work has actually taken a lot from Stephen Shore, is the first contemporary photographer I've seen who has really done something with the 'banal aesthetic' and given it personal depth. His photographs embrace the nostalgia that is sitting just below the surface in a lot of this kind of work. He has dared to strip it of its cooly observed 'appearence' and add some atmosphere. I deeply admire him for making a bold step in moving past the superficial that has plagued photography for so long, in this age of appearences. Neither does he wear designer clothes or speak about his own work like a critic might - he doesn't feel the need to defend it with art speak. http://www.toddhido.com/

    The over-intellectualizing of their own work - words before images - isn't just my own silly observation, and I can only guess you're pretending to be naive for the sake of argument. See this link for a more light hearted take on what I'm getting at - http://www.artybollocks.com/



    So in short, personal concerns over the contrived in style and letting the work speak for itself. Quite a manifesto, ey?

    sounds like a great manifesto to me !

    yes, i am being kind of naive for the sake of argument ..
    and i do agree that a lot of artwork ( photographs, paintings whatever ) are heavy on conceptualization light on everything else ..
    (to me at least ) there is always a place for that, and i think it is kind of a funny that it sells ... maybe it makes sense to someone ?

    thanks for the links ...
    i have seen the BS generator before and it is pretty funny.

    i think i have seen hido's work before. i am not familiar with stephen shore's work ( i only have heard the name and know he is "famous" )
    and i like some of the abandoned home images where the light casts images on the walls, but the rest of them and the muted colors are kind of nice too.
    but in the end they look similar to others who have a similar style. the deadpan portraits are kind of nice too,
    like movie stills ( some of them ) i don't see much difference between these and other deadpan portraits i have seen.
    maybe i am drawn to them because i have done similar things, i am always drawn to the abandoned ( people and buildings ).

    regarding your gallery uploads ..
    i wasn't insinuating that they were awful or amateurish at all ...
    i am a fan of both kinds of images you uploaded, and find them to be much more interesting
    than most things, both being pedaled in galleries &c as "art" ...


    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 03-11-2012 at 01:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #46

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    I took a look at the Hido website and it isn't anything new either. People like Jeff Brouws have been doing this kind of work for decades. So again, this all comes down to personal taste and interpretations, and nothing more. OP finds it a bold step forward from Shore. I prefer Shore. Nobody's wrong. It doesn't mean OPs issue and questions are not valid though.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    I was talking about curators up until that point, but jnanian put words in my mouth!
    i always thought they were the same thing, sorry for my misunderstanding.
    i am completely clueless, and i did not mean to suggest that you are as ignorant as me.

    john

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I took a look at the Hido website and it isn't anything new either. People like Jeff Brouws have been doing this kind of work for decades.
    Jeff Brouws, the typologist? If you look at Hido's 'House Hunting' series you'll see that the images play on a longing for suburbia, the houses aren't empty vessels like with Brouws' studies. Hido concentrates on the mystery of what might be going on inside, not to mention the misty and evocative atmospheres the houses inhabit - and also his portraits which suggest the people who might live in these places. It's all about narrative. Brouws and Hido are coming from completely different places - one concerned with surface, the other concerned with the mystery that lies beneath. I suggest you take another look.

    Not that Brouws is inferior, just very different.
    Last edited by batwister; 03-11-2012 at 03:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #49
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    I'm a fan of Hido's work, though it took me sometime to come around to it, but I agree, it's quite personal, and seems a natural evolution of earlier work you mentioned. I firmly believe, however, that work that truly stands out will find its audience despite the taste makers telling us what's good for us. There's a lot of highly conceptual art and photography out there that leaves me cold, and I'll take a personal shooter like Hido over just about anyone thinking too much about it all.

    With all that said, I'm not a big fan of what I've seen as a trend toward the curator as"art star", it seems to me we see more and more curator names on the wall along with the artists in big shows at museums, but if they've done their job well, their hand in it should be far more invisible than they seem to be lately, and keep their names in the catalog at the end of the essay... not alongside the work they selected to present on the wall, imnsho.

  10. #50
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    The museum environment is such a narrow microcosm of the photographic world, that the discussion here fits more comfortably in a forum about museums and collectors than it does in APUG.

    I say this not to discourage the posters here (this thread is not without some interest, and I am glad to see it here) but rather to point out that it is important to understand how small and specialized (some might say isolated) the collecting and curating world is.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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