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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by munz6869 View Post
    Crikey!

    With architectural photography, I've waited for aaages for a scene to be clear to photograph, whilst the light changes and I freeze or boil to death. I think in that circumstance, if the shot were critical and you looked like you were settled in, I'd come over and have a chat and try to "engage" you with what I was up to - discuss it like a human being (you may have more 'right' to be there than I do - who knows 'till there's a dialogue?). I reckon if I was you in your situation, I'd be grumpy too!!

    Marc!
    I've been in the same position, waiting patiently while mentally cursing people to "get out of the way"!! Last week I spent nearly an hour waiting unsuccessfully for an architecutural scene to be clear of people (too open a view to ask them individually)!

    If it were really necessary (and practical), I would chat to someone pleasantly, explain what I was trying to do, and ask politely if they could just spare a moment and move for me. I've never had any trouble, and often the person has shown interest in what I was doing, and even apologised for not realising! BUT, if I were a professional photographer or film-maker, I would consider it appropriate to get any permits or authorities necessary in a public place, and, even then, use common sense and decency rather than being heavy-handed.
    Or just choose a time and day when the place was quiet.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by c.d.ewen View Post
    Doesn't work in NYC.
    This is not true. I encountered more than a few such scenes when I worked in New York (a hazard of living there), and it was pretty clear that once the movie people get their permits and set up, they feel they completely own the space and are quite comfortable ordering people around rudely, usually because it's a matter of herd control, not just one or two people. I did have to get kind of rude with one guy blocking a restaurant doorway where I was trying to pick up an order for takeout. I'm not going to wait while my dinner gets cold.

  3. #13

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    If asked nicely, I'll gladly move. If rude, then I'd stay, even if I had somewhere else to be, just to be annoying. It's a small pleasure.

  4. #14
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Having not been there, I can't know for sure the woman's precise approach.

    But I have worked as a professional, both at a newspaper and for portrait/wedding work...it's hard work and keep in mind there's 2 other people besides who are involved.

    Being polite and diplomatic is a given (or should be) but I'd give the shooter a break -- it's hard work and there's more than enough stress as it is. I don't get enough pleasure from being a dick to somebody else that it makes up for the stress involved.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    Ten minutes later she clears me to move back, and thanks me, to which I grumble "are you a professional photographer"? and she replies Yes sir. I resist the urge to say "You need to work on the professional part", and don't say anything at all.
    No offense, but I think the grumbling attitude was un-necessary. Was it really inconvenient to move for 10 mintues?

  6. #16
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."
    I like that, Colin. Empathy. Goes both ways.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #17
    CGW
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    My city sells dated and timed permits for "professional" (sic) photographers to shoot at city-owned parks and properties. The permits are also specific about location within public spaces, which limits the likelihood of this sort of scene. I've had hacks try to push me, friends and family out of spots that are not designated; few when asked have permits and out themselves usually with the old "it's a public park, dude." Very few pros in my area bother with this sort of lowball engagement, wedding, portrait work which is now the realm of self-important poseurs. They're making it rough for everyone, so I'm often guilty of telling them to f-off till I'm done. As for their clients' innocence, it's often a look-in on what sort of schlock they'll be asked to pay for. Not my worry.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    My city sells dated and timed permits for "professional" (sic) photographers to shoot at city-owned parks and properties. The permits are also specific about location within public spaces, which limits the likelihood of this sort of scene.
    My city does the same, and for movie/TV/commercial advertizement shoots it can shut down entire city blocks for days. The production companies even hire off-duty cops and/or thugs to protect their turf... most of which is being occupied but not utilized 70% of the time.

  9. #19
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    In the NYC subway, I think it would have been acceptable for that assistant to just walk up and say, "Excuse me. We're trying to shoot a movie, here. Would you mind backing off, please."

    Minding every "P and Q", and trying to be perfectly polite isn't always necessary, especially in a place like the NYC subway. In some cases, being TOO polite could set a person against you just as much as if you were totally rude. The perception of politeness varies with the location and situation.

    Construction workers on a job site would probably be justified in shouting, "Hey! Out of the way!" but the same thing said in the public library would probably get you tossed out.

    If that woman would have approached you at the gazebo in the park and said that she was a photographer and that her clients wanted to have their wedding pictures taken at that location, I'd expect your reaction would have been completely different.

    It doesn't matter whether the photographer is using the most complex, 8x10 large format camera or a digi-snapper. More than half of the photographer's job has nothing to do with the camera, the film, the computer or any other kind of equipment. It has everything to do with how you relate to people. A gruff photographer is probably not going to get a flattering wedding portrait out of a newlywed couple, especially when he runs around ordering people out of his way. It takes somebody who knows how to talk to people and make them feel good about doing what they are asked.

    It's not what you say but how you say it.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  10. #20
    blansky's Avatar
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    What?

    Any real photographer would have just photoshopped you out. Must have been some antiquated analog type.

    Seriously, though I've run into this many many times. I politely ask them to move and explain the reason and they always kindly move. Often I offer them a gift certificate for a portrait session and 8x10 that I carry with me.

    Never once had a problem and to the OP, Wayne, thanks for moving.

    Certain locations are so important to us.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

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