Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,910   Online: 936
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,280
    Images
    2

    Would you please move?

    So, I'm sitting in a public place, a gazebo. I have gone to this place specifically because it is shaded, has an electric outlet for my computer
    and is a public place. I am away from home, camping, writing for a writing project and I have finally discovered a good place I can write and watch my dog at the same time. I have my computer plugged in and my notebooks out in front of me, my dog tied up beside me, and I'm typing away. A woman walks up and asks me to move, but it's clear she isn't really asking. I'm appalled by her nerve, because I'm pretty well ensconced in this spot, and I'm finally getting some writing done. I ask her how far? Just to the other side of the gazebo? No, she wants me out of the gazebo entirely so she can photograph a young couple. I make it very clear that I am not pleased, but I decide not to make a scene (I'm very good at making them) for the sake of the young couple who are innocent in this. I shut down my computer, pack it up, untie my dog, and grumbling, move 100 feet away, into the sun where I can't see my computer screen, and watch her take a bunch of pictures of the couple. Ten minutes later she clears me to move back, and thanks me, to which I grumble "are you a professional photographer"? and she replies Yes sir. I resist the urge to say "You need to work on the professional part", and don't say anything at all.

    She was never blatantly rude, but it was obvious from her demeanor that she fully expected me to comply. I found her asking me to move at all rude, even if it was done in ac pseudo-courteous way.

    Professional photographer? Discuss.

  2. #2
    munz6869's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia!
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,045
    Images
    51
    Crikey!

    With architectural photography, I've waited for aaages for a scene to be clear to photograph, whilst the light changes and I freeze or boil to death. I think in that circumstance, if the shot were critical and you looked like you were settled in, I'd come over and have a chat and try to "engage" you with what I was up to - discuss it like a human being (you may have more 'right' to be there than I do - who knows 'till there's a dialogue?). I reckon if I was you in your situation, I'd be grumpy too!!

    Marc!
    Marc Morel
    photographie argentique!
    ------------
    http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/

  3. #3
    zsas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,959
    Images
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    Professional photographer?
    Unpofessional photographer

    She should have engaged, "Hi sir (smiling), I have been hired to photograph this lovely couple who is soon to be married, and this is a special place to them, I would like....."
    Andy

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Huntsville, Alabama and Oxford, Alabama
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    453
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    sounds like the place was pretty scenic. Not suprised a couple would want some photo's there. I think since the place is public, she was as right to ask you to move as you were to be sitting there. I think she could have handled it better, though.

    But then, It's possible that she was dealing with a hard to deal with couple who were giving her a hard time, or she was in a not so plesant mood, or something. But then, if I was in your situation, I'd probably be a little grumy imwardly, as well.

    But anyway, on a different note, I hope your project is going well
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  5. #5
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,545
    Images
    15
    Obviously none of us were there to witness the exchange.

    But I disagree with the suggestion she was unreasonable. Many professional photographers (several I know personally in corporate and wedding work) would be a lot more forthright in their directions. I think she's fairly good in her capacity to communicate subtly, even assertively. We all have our own ways of communicating based on experience. I have had my moments ushering stragglers out of my organised landscape shoot, and by and large, they are very happy to oblige, to which I make my appreciation very well known, to the point of thanking them personally after the shoot. A family enjoying a wonderful early autumn evening on the beach put down smack-bang in a scene I had been framing for 1 hour. I approached the husband and explained what I was doing. He, wife,three kids and dog happily moved away. Afterward, I thanked him and he responded, "no worried, mate" (well, this is typically Australian!). Diplomacy is much better than making a scene, and if somebody doesn't move, then the professional should just let it rest and scoot for another set up. Weddings elevate the photographer assigned to move people, members of the public, around and about so as his imaging is not impinged. In public places, people are not obliged to move for anybody, certainly not photographers and again, diplomacy wins the day even if you must go to lengths to qualify and assert the necessity for the person/s to move. Accept refusal gracefully and move on; it's only a photo. I've not had the frosty exchange that you had, but many times have issued a pointed finger to indicate "out of frame please!" (if people are distant), or just move elsewhere if people are clear they are not going to move (and some people want to be very clear).
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 03-16-2012 at 12:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #6
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    I agree. If this woman had just come over and talked to you first, I wouldn't have been peeved off.
    In fact, if she got on my good side, I'd run interference for her, too.

    But, if she gets on my bad side, I'm just as likely to tell her to piss off.

    If you really want to have some fun, next time somebody approaches you like that, put your hand up to your ear and talk into your wristwatch, "Code green! Hold your positions!"
    Last edited by Worker 11811; 03-16-2012 at 12:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #7
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,817
    Move to the background of all her shots. Proceed to take off shirt in slow mo for a time lapse effect. Carry dog in arms or on head. Aim shiny laptop to reflect light/flare into lens. Smile devilishly.

  8. #8
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,095
    You could just say, I will when I am done. Right now I am busy.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    527
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    But I disagree with the suggestion she was unreasonable. Many professional photographers (several I know personally in corporate and wedding work) would be a lot more forthright in their directions.
    Doesn't work in NYC.

    Some years ago, I was catching a late - 2 AM - train home from Grand Central Terminal. GCT, usually fairly empty at that time, was full of people, all standing around at discrete distances from one another. They were extras in a feature film being shot there, all standing at their "places" marks. Since I was early for the train, I stood at the entrance to the track, to see if some famous Hollywood stars would appear. A scruffy-looking 20-something (I was in my dark 3-piece custom-made pin-striped Brooks Brothers suit, 7-eyelet Allen Edmonds shoes, etc - you get the picture) approached me and brusquely ordered me to get down the track. I politely replied with a firm, "No", while the gentleman standing next to me (also in business attire), said something immeasureably more impolite. The roughian switched to diplomatic mode, explained the situation, and asked us to move. We engaged him with questions about the film for a minute or two, just to demonstrate our manhood. When he asked a second time, we immediately complied. He could have saved himself a lot of time.

    We figured he wasn't from New York.

    Charley

  10. #10
    urbantarzan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Trinidad & Tobago
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16
    Did you have an APUG jersy on?.... most digtal photographers don't like us
    "Digital is better than film" distilled to pure emotion, reads as "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn."

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin