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  1. #31
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Opinions are like @$$holes, everyone has one. Consider the source foe the critique.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #32
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Photographers are trained to be critical of the images they see, either through self-study, course work or through their vocation. That is the essence of being a good photographer. One must have the ability to see an image and, with razor-like vision, cut it down to its component parts and analyze them in order to produce a good photograph.

    Some people develop this habit automatically. For the very best, it becomes second nature.

    I can not walk into a movie theater and look at the screen without seeing what's right and what's wrong with the picture. Sometimes, I get so bad that my wife refuses to go to the movie theater with me. One time, we went to a movie theater in Charleston, SC, several hundred miles away from home and, when the movie started, the projector wasn't framed correctly, causing a frame line to blink on the edge of the screen. My eyes were glued to it. I couldn't watch the movie. At first, I went out to the lobby and complained but the problem didn't get fixed. I went out to the lobby again but nobody was there. I looked around and found the door that led upstairs to the projection booth. I peeked upstairs but nobody was there. (The projector was running totally unattended! ) So, I sneaked upstairs, fixed the problem and went back down to the theater to watch the rest of the movie. This was a theater that I didn't work at and had never visited before.

    Yes, I know it was probably an a$$hole thing to do but I saw a problem, tried to get somebody to fix it and didn't get satisfaction. First, I am a professional theater technician. What was I supposed to do? Let a theater full of paying customers watch a crappy picture because some doofus was too busy chatting up the chick at the concession stand to do his job? This problem took less than 15 seconds to fix. Literally a turn of a knob.

    Developing a critical eye is one thing. Politeness is another thing. Yes, it is sometimes better not to say anything.
    However, consider this: The guy who gives his unsolicited opinion cares enough about photography to give you his opinion on your photo.
    Okay, it was only an advertisement. The guy was probably off the deep end.

    If one is going to give unsolicited critique, I would suggest he be diplomatic about it and give a proper, balanced critique and not just slam the other guy's work.

    No matter how you slice it, to display artwork in any form, by it's nature, invites criticism. It has from the beginning of time:

    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #33
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Thanks for your service, Griz. And for protecting our freedom.
    Dan

    Quote Originally Posted by Griz View Post
    Never said it was ok, or wouldn't initially tick me off, but I've learned over the years to let the "clueless" comments run off my back. After being call a "baby-killer" in the '70's for serving my country, I figured out that you can either take things like that to heart, and drive yourself nuts, or decide if you really give a crap what they think, and get on with life.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  4. #34
    Griz's Avatar
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    You're very welcome Dan, it was an honor to serve...
    Get out and shoot!!!

  5. #35
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old-N-Feeble View Post
    Frankly, I wouldn't give a crap what someone thought of my shirt... or my panties... unless she was turned off by them.
    What if they belong to her?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #36

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    some people never had their mother or grandmother tell them
    if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all ...

  7. #37
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post

    I can not walk into a movie theater and look at the screen without seeing what's right and what's wrong with the picture. Sometimes, I get so bad that my wife refuses to go to the movie theater with me. One time, we went to a movie theater in Charleston, SC, several hundred miles away from home and, when the movie started, the projector wasn't framed correctly, causing a frame line to blink on the edge of the screen. My eyes were glued to it. I couldn't watch the movie. At first, I went out to the lobby and complained but the problem didn't get fixed. I went out to the lobby again but nobody was there. I looked around and found the door that led upstairs to the projection booth. I peeked upstairs but nobody was there. (The projector was running totally unattended! ) So, I sneaked upstairs, fixed the problem and went back down to the theater to watch the rest of the movie. This was a theater that I didn't work at and had never visited before.

    Yes, I know it was probably an a$$hole thing to do but I saw a problem, tried to get somebody to fix it and didn't get satisfaction. First, I am a professional theater technician. What was I supposed to do? Let a theater full of paying customers watch a crappy picture because some doofus was too busy chatting up the chick at the concession stand to do his job? This problem took less than 15 seconds to fix. Literally a turn of a knob.
    ]
    Awesome story. That was pretty ballsy haha!

  8. #38
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    I critique the work of others when I am specifically requested to do so. It is almost an art form. By the sound of it, the "photographer" was simply sounding off without any skilled observation or contextual analysis or reflection on the capacity of the producer of the work to capture and convey the desired message in the image. Many digital "professionals" are like this: one recently decided to launch into one of my Ilfochrome trannies, but entirely missed the point that the way it turned out was a deliberate effort, not a "terrible technical error"! This guy seems to make a name for himself jumping from one lily pad to the next without qualifying himself or his critiques — or whether or not he is actually a photographer!

    Unsolicited critiques can safely be ignored — and that's how I would treat the one that you received in response to an advertisement! You didn't ask for it and unless some salient, valid and proven carry-over points are extant in such a critique, it's not worth taking it on board, nor respecting the author of such critique. On the other hand, stand up and take notice of those who have done the hard yards and made a good impression on many people (e.g. in Clubs or Associations) over many years: they're not the types who would pull a Jack-in-the-box critique unannounced in an attempt to impress upon another as a means of deflecting their own weaknesses or lack of skill (and especially often visible, a profound lack of compassion and respect).
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #39
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I guess if one is willing to accept unsolicited praise one shouldn't allow oneself to get to upset over unsolicited critique.

    In any case, neither should be given much weight unless they are, in themselves, worthy of that weight.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post

    We've closed our studio, and used a previous photo as an example of a background that is for sale, in an ad.. Someone actually critiqued it. A for sale ad.
    They should just go on ebay and have a field day!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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