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  1. #11
    zsas's Avatar
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    Congrats on your studies!

    Learn everything you can....maybe an elective or two so opposite of you....

    Follow your heart....all comes secondly

    This video inspires me....might you too
    http://vimeo.com/25380454
    Andy

  2. #12

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    Thanks

    Haha. I am also a journalism student. It is completely objective as opposed to subjective art. But that is a whole other matter.

    What I am really asking about is the current state of photography and its future. It isn't necessarily about me but the art as a whole.

    The video is true. Just look at classic, renaissance and neo-classical art. How many times are we going to do colored (classical), white nude statues?

    This is why they have us do master studies or take aspects from other artists in painting assignments. Copy, transform and combine
    Last edited by Darkroom317; 05-11-2012 at 08:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  3. #13
    zsas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    What I am really asking about is the current state of photography and its future. It isn't necessarily about me but the art as a whole.
    It is about you! You are the future!
    Andy

  4. #14
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    It is about you! You are the future!
    This is the real story. The first criticism that says you need to develop technique and concept, well that sounds damning on the surface. But if you can twist it around to mean you are "just starting out and have unlimited potential"...

    cliveh, here on this forum, is a teacher who conceptually works as Henri-Cartier Bresson but lately has been trying new things I imagine like Wynn Bullock's color abstractions might have been... Maybe you can take a class from him during your schooling - if not formally - maybe through correspondence. I hope I'm not being presumptuous but travel to learn from different teachers would be a good thing for an art student.

    I have a friend, a sculptor, who takes amazing pictures with his iPhone. I recently discovered a third generation photographer who is covering the same territory of his forbears (his grandfather was known to develop E6 4x5 in the basement), but this grandson is using non-analog techniques. He revisits amazing scenery trying again and again to get it right. Both these photographers are today shaking my idea of what constitutes fine art.

  5. #15
    jp498's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    It is about you! You are the future!
    I like that!

    I'd ask why you need to get a BFA ? I'd guess it's of little economic value long term. Are you looking to get deeper into photography? Expand horizons? I pursued a mostly non-art college education and study and practice photography at my own pace and interest (along with work, family, and other pursuits)


    “Work needs conceptual and technical development” Get used to being misunderstood as an adult doing your own thing. It never stops if you keep learning and doing. Consider it matter-of-fact that nobody actually understands anyone real well, and it goes both ways. Consider their suggestion an opportunity that could either help you, help you understand other photography, or both. If they are wrong (which is unlikely as it's quite vague), nothing's new. If they are right, rise to the challenge.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    What I am really asking about is the current state of photography and its future. It isn't necessarily about me but the art as a whole.
    people always speculate about what the future of anything will be like.
    writers, poets in the 1800s guessed, movies in the 19-teens, 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s &c never got any of it right, not even "near future".

    things don't change very fast.
    the future of photography, won't really be much different than it is now ... and the "NOW" isn't much different than it was 20 or 30 years ago ...

    in art school teachers can be very critical of student-work, but that is their job ... they are preparing you for the world outside of school
    where you do work for clients

    they want to make sure that when you hear critical things like "when i said do whatever you wanted, i didn't mean do whatever you wanted, what were you thinking"
    you can say why you did something and what the point was ... not just "well you said do whatever i wanted, and i wanted to do this"

    good luck and have fun!

    john

  7. #17
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    Historically many of the best artists (not all) in various mediums had serious mental issues and were usually one trick ponies.

    Many were homosexual and many were suffering from severe bi-polar syndromes.

    So my advice is, if you're not already, develop a liking for people of the same sex, and do a lot of drugs to fuck yourself up.

    Wear strange clothes, hang around in bars and clubs and act "different".

    Soon you'll be noticed, become famous and rich, exploited, and bitter.

    As far as the work goes, don't worry too much about it.

    It's not about the work, it's about how strange you are.

    There are people that can sell the work, because most of art is bullshit anyway.

    Enjoy the ride.
    Last edited by blansky; 05-12-2012 at 10:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    First a metaphor.

    My wife went back to school to get back up to speed with a certificate in GIS at the encouragement of the gentleman she was working for. She wants to re-enter the full-time job market and have her own career after raising our daughter. It's her turn.

    On her return she was required to take some math. She hated those first classes, went through all the classical arguments where the heck was she going to use this, blah, blah, blah, then she took a course in databases for fun, and then declared a major, computer science since she was going to be in school enough to get a second degree.

    She is now one semester from being a full fledged "coder" to be able to do exactly what she wanted to do, GIS.

    The point of having to learn things and stretch outside the box of what you think you need is to give you context that you will need, and possibly as in my wife's case, the ability for even greater specialization.

    Which brings me to my point.

    I'm going to assume that you want to make a living with your education/art. If that is true you need to understand the status quo of thinking in the business/the market, because regardless of your vision you have to create something salable to survive in the business.

    Copying Ansel (or anybody else) probably won't get you paid well enough. You need to bring something fresh to the table if you want to make a comfortable living. Ansel had the same struggle to set himself apart, it was the f64 crowd vs the Pictorialists back in his early days.

    Food for thought.

    If you've already decided on the artistic style (product) you want to offer the market, your challenge is no longer "artistic", it's one of "business"; marketing, sales, manufacturing, and accounting.

    If that's true you might need to ask yourself if you are even in the right program.

    My bet is that, like most of us would, you will learn a lot about yourself in the program you are in.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I second the general train of ideas expressed by Blansky and add that if you die young your works will certainly have more value in the market, but you have to generate some heirs beforehand and it all will be lost to the State.
    You should preferably die of an overdose of alcohol and benzodiazepine, or maybe glue solvents, that kind of stuff. Cocaine is obviously utterly banal and might even damage your posthumous reputation.

    Before that, remember to impress the buyers: wearing sport shoes with a tight doesn't work any more. Try a bathrobe. When they ask you, say "I am an admirer of Marat". Don't worry, they won't know Marat.

    If you have hairs, you should paint them alternatively with all primary subtractive colours or all primary addictive colours. Don't mix them up, as you'll be making "a statement about the importance of colour in our visual perception of things" and " showing practically how colours are always in the head of the visual artist".

    Being homosexual is a bit too exploited. I suggest going to a vernissage with your goat and introducing it as "your fiancé" specifying it's a male goat obviously lest they think you are a conformist.

    Above all don't let anybody suspect you are normal

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #20
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    A more serious answer. Our fathers said "De gustibus non est disputandum" because they understood, many centuries ago, that any reasoning around art is ultimately a mental masturbation. Art is art. If you get it, you get it on some other plane than the intellectual one. When you begin rationalising, justifying, and analysing too much, art ends and mental masturbation begins.
    For centuries, we have called this mental masturbation "Aesthetics" and have studied it in Philosophy faculties. I mean, people who didn't need to work for a living.
    But the fact remains, that Verdi or Wagner or Monteverdi (or Bernini, Borromini etc.) never "justified", or felt the need to "justify" on the intellectual plane what they were doing. Art can be judged only on the plane of art, and that cannot be expressed in words.

    In short: where University begins, art ends, and where art begins, University ends.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

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