Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,572   Posts: 1,545,659   Online: 953
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 60
  1. #21
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,738
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    Historically many of the best artists (not all) in various mediums had serious mental issues and were usually one trick ponies.

    Many were homosexual and many were suffering from severe bi-polar syndromes.

    So my advice is, if you're not already, develop a liking for people of the same sex, and do a lot of drugs to fuck yourself up.

    Wear strange clothes, hang and bars and clubs and act "different".

    Soon you'll be noticed, become famous and rich, exploited, and bitter.

    As far as the work goes, don't worry too much about it.

    It's not about the work, it's about how strange you are.

    There are people that can sell the work, because most of art is bullshit anyway.

    Enjoy the ride.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,045
    It's very difficult for a photograph to be art. This has always been true, but now it's much harder. The plethora of good images has increased not by careful and intentional design but by monkeys at the typewriter. With a limit of 36 exposures to work with (or even less for MF and LF work) each image on film needs to be carefully considered or you're either documenting what is (which is totally fine, but it's not art) or you're just plain wasting film. The exception there is when you are documenting extraordinary events, lives, or places.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  3. #23
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    It's very difficult for a photograph to be art.
    That's because photographers are trying to be good at it. A total waste of time.

    You're far better off to fuck up the exposure, fuck up the focus, fuck up the shift/tilts, if you're anal enough to have them, and then fuck up the developing.

    Once you have the developed negative place it carefully on floor and place your foot on it, turn on Chubby Checker and do the twist with it.

    When you print it, make an hack, amateur print and develop it in the wrong shit.

    And viola.

    You be an artiste.

    And wear a cape.
    Last edited by blansky; 05-12-2012 at 12:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  4. #24
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,738
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    It's very difficult for a photograph to be art. This has always been true, but now it's much harder. The plethora of good images has increased not by careful and intentional design but by monkeys at the typewriter. With a limit of 36 exposures to work with (or even less for MF and LF work) each image on film needs to be carefully considered or you're either documenting what is (which is totally fine, but it's not art) or you're just plain wasting film. The exception there is when you are documenting extraordinary events, lives, or places.
    I truly disagree.

    it is relatively easy for most any medium to be made into art. The craft of photography is mature, it's qualities are understood, teachable, and repeatable. Same is true of painting, metal working, marble work...

    What is tough is evoking emotion and marketing the work, that's where being on the fringe helps.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    Historically many of the best artists (not all) in various mediums had serious mental issues and were usually one trick ponies.

    Many were homosexual and many were suffering from severe bi-polar syndromes.

    So my advice is, if you're not already, develop a liking for people of the same sex, and do a lot of drugs to fuck yourself up.

    Wear strange clothes, hang around in bars and clubs and act "different".

    Soon you'll be noticed, become famous and rich, exploited, and bitter.

    As far as the work goes, don't worry too much about it.

    It's not about the work, it's about how strange you are.

    There are people that can sell the work, because most of art is bullshit anyway.

    Enjoy the ride.

    Mapplethorpe and Warhol.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    I think any romanticism in art now is perceived as superstitious and our skeptical culture lumps it alongside religion. Most of the big names in photography are fundamentalist atheists, dwelling on emptiness. The 'thousand-yard stare' of Gursky and Shore disciples is the ghoulish preoccupation of the uninspired. There is only a void for these artists and they are endlessly swimming in its inky black depths. Passionate artists fill that void with their imaginations and are called naive for it, when really, this is in fact the embracing of life. Art now seems to mirror the increasingly hopeless search in science for 'something else'. It's a greater awareness of the cosmic and the forsaking of religion/spirituality that makes us see atoms where before we saw a life-affirming landscape. A tree is no different from a lamp post with this mindset and I don't think there's any going back from that.

    The fact that any photographer practising more traditional landscape photography has to 'explain himself' is a real problem. Artists are not scientists, they shouldn't need a grand theory. The artist statement these days is akin to a thesis which has to be submitted to a committee, the work being mere experiments, proof.

  7. #27
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,331
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    I will admit I am a fan of Ansel Adams and other modernist photographers, so my work is formally similar. It seems to me that the current art community looks down on landscape photography even though Adams and landscaper painters such as J.M.W Turner are studied and revered.
    I see nothing wrong with you working in whatever style you wish. If you wish to emulate the style of Adams, then stick with it and after several hundred/thousand photographs you will notice your work is not like Adams but your own. Everybody copies or is inspired by someone and although professors may suggest (not tell) you what to do, you don’t have to follow. There are no rules, so be true to yourself.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #28
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Being homosexual is a bit too exploited. I suggest going to a vernissage with your goat and introducing it as "your fiancé" specifying it's a male goat obviously lest they think you are a conformist.

    You're probably right, being a homosexual is probably passe.

    But being from Rome we probably have cultural differences because here in the US, most rural men have at least one goat they consider special.

    Won't get a second glance.

    I'm maybe thinking, an owl.

    Walk around with it on your shoulder and call it your muse.

    Could be perfect. Supposed to be wise, nocturnal, and can give you that "what the fuck are you looking at" kind of look.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  9. #29
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,738
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    There are no rules, so be true to yourself.
    We don't live in a vacuum.

    There are rules and they nearly always apply; if one wants to pass a class the professor's rules apply, or if one intends to succeed in marketing their art, the rules of the market apply. If I want to please my wife's taste in art I need to use color, that's the rule.

    The only time "the rules" don't apply is for purely personal work.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alamo City, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,321
    I suppose having a goat as a significant other might have its perks. For instance you can sell it and buy a younger model. Or, if it pisses you you off you can kill it without going to jail... as long as the animal rights folks don't find out. And that would result in free dinners for quite some time.

    OMG... I think I'm becoming as wanky as Blansky!!

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin