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  1. #21
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post

    One other thing to add: if you are driving a car that can only go 50 miles an hour, it's pretty easy to drive at 50. If you have a car that can go 100 miles an hour, driving at 50 is much much harder. Takes a lot of discipline.
    Nah..almost any car can go 100 miles an hour. But a car that can just go 100 isn't much fun at that speed. Now a car (or in my case a motorcycle) that can go say, 150...
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #22
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    One of my fellow faculty offers an alternative assignment in his advanced class. Instead of working on a project of some sort over the course of a 16 week semester, a student may choose to shoot (develop and contact) an entire roll of 135-36 film every day. 7x16= 112 rolls, 4032 exposures in four months. This forces the student to carry the camera with them everywhere they go and look through it constantly, thus teaching them how to really see through the camera. By the end of the 16 weeks, their photographic vision through the lens is far more refined than before. The great photographers don't take one shot and leave, they shoot and shoot and shoot, then edit. The more they shoot the better they get.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  3. #23
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Davis View Post
    One of my fellow faculty offers an alternative assignment in his advanced class. Instead of working on a project of some sort over the course of a 16 week semester, a student may choose to shoot (develop and contact) an entire roll of 135-36 film every day. 7x16= 112 rolls, 4032 exposures in four months. This forces the student to carry the camera with them everywhere they go and look through it constantly, thus teaching them how to really see through the camera. By the end of the 16 weeks, their photographic vision through the lens is far more refined than before. The great photographers don't take one shot and leave, they shoot and shoot and shoot, then edit. The more they shoot the better they get.
    Returning to my OP, if this is true, then surely digital photography would have thrown up a plethora of brilliant photographers, which to-date it has not. I would suggest the above exercise forces the student to shoot a film a day rather than how to see through a camera. In fact I would advocate the opposite exercise of perhaps shooting less and observing more.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  4. #24
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    David Hurn says you don't just wander around shooting everything in sight. You make a list and shoot until you get everything on the list.

    On Being a Photographer by David Hurn/Magnum & Bill Jay

    http://lenswork.com/obp.htm

    The sample chapter will hook you in.

  5. #25
    blansky's Avatar
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    Freeman Patterson says shoot a roll of film before you get out of bed in the morning. Shoot everything you can and learn how to "see".

    Look at common objects in a different manner.

    Battling gurus mean nothing.

    Shoot what you want, when you want. Make your own decisions.

    Being a photographer is an evolution. What you do today you may or may not have 5 years ago.

    Different camera formats equal different shooting styles. You don't shoot an 8x10 the way you shoot 35mm.
    Last edited by blansky; 05-19-2012 at 12:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #26
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Returning to my OP, if this is true, then surely digital photography would have thrown up a plethora of brilliant photographers, which to-date it has not. I would suggest the above exercise forces the student to shoot a film a day rather than how to see through a camera. In fact I would advocate the opposite exercise of perhaps shooting less and observing more.
    Garbage in, garbage out.

    Your original premise is too faulty to reach any kind of conclusion.

    There are thousands of brilliant photographers shooting today in digital and analog. The difference is everyone is bombarded with images today that nothing seems special.

    If you're trying to compare the so called greats of yesteryear, they were greats because there were so few (in comparison to today) of them shooting and their work seemed special and unique. You can also add in the nostalgia factor to their work. In the 1950's great photography was only seen in magazines like Life, National Geographic and a few others, and even then there was only something spectacular every few months. TV sucked so the images were not impressive. Occasionally a local newspaper had a great photo, but not often.

    Add in the fact that people didn't travel, so a great photographs would open up whole new worlds to the viewer. Today, people have literally seen everything. We are jaded.

    Your original premise is wrong. There a people on APUG that are better than Ansel Adams. There are probably better street shooters than HCB. There are better portrait photographers than Karsh. The only difference is, nothing is special anymore.

    And this has nothing to do with analog or digital. And motor drives have been around since the 70s.
    Last edited by blansky; 05-19-2012 at 12:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #27
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I didn't like reading David Hurn, because he was telling me if I keep doing it my way I will never amount to anything. I swear I will not ever tell anyone their approach is a waste of time.

    But there are some specific clear instructions that I can take, even if I don't take the entire philosophy.

  8. #28
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    The Canadian photographer Sherman Hines who did a few books back in the 80s of scenic parts of Canada once discussed his philosophy. He said he could never work like Ansel Adams, parked for hours/days waiting for the perfect shot.

    He said he could take ten rolls of film of different subject matter while Adams was still sitting waiting for a shot that may or may not appear.

    Some may say, well I've never heard or Sherman Hines so why would I care what he thought. Well, his work was pretty great, but the difference was he shot color.

    Surrealism like black and white will usually win out over color.

    The moral to the story though is, do what you feel.

    Also Hines shot with a Pentax 6x7 and Adams with a 4x5/8x10 (5x7???).

    Different strokes.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  9. #29

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    * r-a-s-p-b-e-r-r-y *

    We only learn to see by doing. Some learn more quickly than others. I claim no "vision".

  10. #30
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I would say that the original argument is faulty for a different reason, and that is the assumption that the "greats" got there by their photographs. They didn't, they got to noteriety through someone else bringing their work to everyone's attention. People here don't seem to like Alec Soth's work, but why is he famous now? Someone in an important gallery saw his work and submitted it to the Whitney Bienniel, launching his career. Without that he would probably still be a lab tech in Minnesota. Ansel Adams was just a guy with a camera until Steiglitz decided to show his work in his own gallery. There are a ton of great photographers that nobody has ever heard of, and there are a few terrible ones that everyone knows because somebody promoted their work to a large audience.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

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