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  1. #21
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    I would never hold you personally responsible. I'm a firm believer that we are only responsible for what we have done.


    My own experience with Japan and the Japanese came when I spent two years there in the mid-1960's. I was there as an airman in the USAF stationed in Fuchu about 35 miles outside of Tokyo. My best friend was a Japanese who worked on the air base. He had the same name as the president then, Eisaku Sato. Satosan and I hung out together off base and shared a car. (He bought it but I owned it. A whole another story.) We spent many a night getting drunk and carousing around in all the bars and eateries for miles around. He seemed to have a cousin everywhere and knew everyone and it wouldn't cost us anything to eat or drink. I always found the Japanese people to be pleasant to me even though I was an American and this was only 20 years after the end of the war. Fact is, I never thought about the war. I felt like a visitor just doing a job over there.


    Anyway,my point made earlier is that we all have two personalities. We can be giving, fair, honest and loving. But there's the dark side of us, all of us. It's good to cleanse the soul when we've done something wrong.

  2. #22
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    I would never hold you personally responsible. I'm a firm believer that we are only responsible for what we have done.

    Yes, but there is a national arrogance and national disconnect in some cases about what a nation has done, and there are people in that nation that are nationalistic and won't admit/accept the hell they have wrought on other people.

    That attitude is where some people have issues.

    There are also cultures that believe themselves superior, and what they do to lesser peoples is of little concern.

    And obviously Germany and Japan both exhibited that in the 30s and 40s.

    There is also some of the morons in the US that believe "my country, right or wrong".

    Very dangerous.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #23

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    It's interesting how the powers-that-be believe so strongly in a one-world-economy but are so much more local when it comes to control of wealth. That relates to what you've been writing, blansky, but I've been in the heat and am a bit confused at the moment so I can't quite articulate why. Maybe I should stop posting for awhile.

  4. #24
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    I'm just happy that the information is out there and easily accessible in the world we live in for those who want to learn. Learning and acceptance is key to humanity's survival, it is the light that keeps us out of the dark ages.

  5. #25
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew.roos View Post
    I think the cancellation, if caused by political pressure (as seems likely) is an unfortunate example of self-censorship. On the other hand, it was brave of Nikon to propose the exhibition in the first place.

    After all, how many US corporates have sponsored exhibitions of Dorothea Lange's photographs of the internment of American citizens of Japanese descent during WWII? None, as far as I am aware. It is an unfortunate fact that all nations have periods in their history that, if presented accurately, show them in a poor light, and which generally are swept under the carpet by government as well as by civil society. Another example would be the atrocities committed by the British during the anti-colonial uprisings in Kenya which are only now coming to light since records were deliberately destroyed, and those that were not were hidden for many years in defiance of access to information legislation. And let me not fail to mention the horrific human rights abuses of my own country's recent past.

    I'm not saying that we should not attempt to shine a light on these sad chapters in all our nations' histories. Certainly we must, for if we do not learn from history it is bound to repeat itself. But it is perhaps best to start at home, with introspection, since "why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?" (Matthew 7:3).
    My thoughts word by word.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

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