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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I would suggest it is both as simultaneous recognition.
    Well, one of Cartier-Bresson mystical quotes, which I don't agree with. Certainly added to his enigma though! It's also been said about Bresson that the decisive moment was when he said "print that one!".

    Personally I think Bresson's intuition told him where the action was, but we might be running into a problem of semantics here. Had another quick witted photographer found himself in the same place, he might have made a photograph just as fascinating... after a few frames. The composition part would of course be subjective, but I believe street photography is more a process of trial and error in this regard and the rest is good editing. I haven't seen Bresson's contact sheets however, so for all I know all his classic compositions could have been on one roll! In that case, I would agree with you.

    I will say there is a recognition that "this composition works", but with landscape there's a good deal of construction before getting to that point, especially when you have only one sheet of film. With street, half a roll might be spent on one scene, hoping for that great shot. This is down to luck, while your intuition is keeping you there saying "something's gonna happen".

    I think there's too much mysticism about the process of composition, especially with street photography and Bresson in particular. Composition for me is about constructing a message, in the same way a writer will construct a great sentence. In conversation sentence construction is intuitive, but in writing it's about logical construction... and I've really tried my best there
    Last edited by batwister; 05-27-2012 at 05:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32
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    Yes, but with all this intuition and composition and seat of the pants photography vs scenics that don't move, there is also the fact about where a person is on their journey.

    What passes as intuition could be experience. He does it now without thinking.

    An experienced street photographer may not even realize that he's composing when in fact his brain did it as he noticed an interesting street scene. To someone watching it just looks like he stumbled on the shot.

    Experienced scenic photographers are probably setting their tripod in the best possible place without much conscious thought.

    The people like Adams and C-B had been doing this for years, and I doubt that their early work was great.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #33

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    C-B's early stuff was excellent--likely because he had been trained in drawing. my own practice fits the statement in question under either exegesis: i draw reasonably well and i rarely waste film on things i wouldn't draw. therefore, a strong vote for the statement's logic. elitist, maybe, it does makes achieving some kinds of results easier, certainly different, in ways inaccessible to non-draftsmen. those of you who take good photographs but don't draw, cut the excuses, get off you bum and learn to draw; with the heart-eye-brain pathway established, traininng the hand is a formality


  4. #34

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    RE art training: I drew a bit in high school and early college but gave it up... just as I did drafting. I could evoke enough life into my drawings and was technically accurate with my drafting... but gawd was I messy!!

    By that time I already had several years of suffering through my own crappy photographic mistakes and waste so I was an okay photographer. However, I do believe those art classes helped me to be more discerning with what and how I photographed. They certainly proved to me that I'm NO artist!!

  5. #35

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    I find having just taken up painting, that my vision of a scene for a possible painting has changed from the way I view a possible photograph and has become more two dimensional in my minds eye; More or less, areas of color on a flat sheet. I'ts like I can alter my vision and see it without depth of field, not that DOF is not introduced thru process into the picture. It's an interesting perspective since in painting you must introduce dof whereas in photography it's a more or less automatic process that many times escaped my personal attention.
    W.A. Crider

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider View Post
    I find having just taken up painting, that my vision of a scene for a possible painting has changed from the way I view a possible photograph and has become more two dimensional in my minds eye; More or less, areas of color on a flat sheet. I'ts like I can alter my vision and see it without depth of field, not that DOF is not introduced thru process into the picture. It's an interesting perspective since in painting you must introduce dof whereas in photography it's a more or less automatic process that many times escaped my personal attention.

    I just finished my first painting class. Same here. I also find that I notice forms and color a lot more around me than I did before. Of course I also took color studies this last semester so that also changed my vision.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

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  7. #37
    blansky's Avatar
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    I find I walk a lot better since I learned to drive a car.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    I just finished my first painting class. Same here. I also find that I notice forms and color a lot more around me than I did before. Of course I also took color studies this last semester so that also changed my vision.
    Yes definitively forms and color. They both take on a heightened awareness.
    W.A. Crider

  9. #39
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    Even prior to the discovery of the photographic process there were many drawings and paintings with that photographic look and I suppose drawing with the aid of a Camera Obscura or Lucida would give that optical view. I have never used a camera Lucida, but would like to give it a try. I wondered if it’s possible to make one from the prism in an old overhead projector.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    I find I walk a lot better since I learned to drive a car.
    Does this mean you are finally using the sidewalk, rather than the middle of the road?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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