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  1. #11
    rthomas's Avatar
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    I'm 41. Last school year, 2011-2012, I took a pair of photo courses at my community college (mainly to get access to the darkroom). The classes were full of young people, mostly under 25 and the upper teens, who own digital and film cameras. In the Fall semester there was one combined section of Photo 1 and Photo 2, but this Spring the school ran two combined sections of each, and both classes filled up. It's true that some people dropped out but not that many. I can tell you from first-hand experience, these students have a lot of enthusiasm for the complete analog process.
    “Art is what we call... the thing an artist does." Seth Godin

  2. #12
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    i'm an old farth (58), deeply submetged an very comfortable with all qspects of analog photography.however i find the additional flexibility of working with digital negatives a welcome additionto the creative process!



    0
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #13
    pstake's Avatar
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    I'm 31, have always used analog processes. Developing and printing my own for 10 years but there's a 3 year hiatus in there. Black and White only (so far). Was introduced to it during a community course at Vermont Center for Photography (Hi, Joan, if you're on here.)

    Later, photo I and II at college (with Ken Spector and then Christa Parravanni) … when there was still a full working darkroom. Not sure if it's still there.

    My love of, and familiarity with, analog processes, solidified when I completed the documentary photography track at Salt Institute For Documentary Studies, in the spring of 2006. I was in the second-to-last class to complete the program, fully analog. In the spring of 2007, they went all digital.

    This was traditional documentary photography, narrative storytelling. Very rarely did we take photos without people in them. To this day that is a sort of rule I go by. I shot 150+ rolls of Neopan, 400, 800 and 1600 ... and handful of Tmax 3200, souped by hand, contact sheets, prints made on RC for Crit and then final prints on Fiber, mostly in 8x10 but some 11x14 … for a gallery show at the end of the semester. I completed two photo essays during that time — about four months. A lot of late nights in the darkroom.

    In short, I'm 31 and I'm an analog lifer.

    That said, For work (journalist - writer but sometimes photographer, too), I/we have no choice but to shoot digital. That's the way of the world, now.

  4. #14
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    Bronica ETRSi, Nikon F3 and FM.

  5. #15
    blansky's Avatar
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    60. Started professionally when I was 25 after about 2 years of shooting. Strictly a commercial portrait photographer that shot Hasselblad for about 30 years. Dabbled in 4x5. After I started my business in 1976 I went about a year using a lab then realized that to do good work you have to print yourself, so I set up a color darkroom. Sold my business in 1986 and moved to LA.

    In LA shot headshots and model portfolios. Did commercial location scouting and worked as a still photographer for movies. Stayed for 7 years.

    Moved to Portland OR worked in a camera store for 1 year.

    Moved to San Jose CA and worked in a camera store for 1 year. Started up my portrait business again only strictly black and white. Stayed for 7 years.

    Moved to Santa Rosa CA. Continued in black and white portraiture. Converted to digital printing first, then digital capture in about 2007 after I couldn't tell the difference between one of my 20x24 digital print and an analog one, which took some time to accomplish.

    Absolutely love digital and everything about it. Sold all my darkroom stuff and enlargers but kept my Nikon F4, 2 Hasselblads and Linhof 4x5.

    Shoot with Canon 1DS Mark3 mostly and print on an Epson 7800. Both black and white and color.
    Last edited by blansky; 06-13-2012 at 12:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #16

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    I'm 27, and started out with a small Canon point and shoot film camera at about age 10. With a fixed shutter speed and aperture, I'm amazed at the amount of acceptable pictures I got from that camera. Used a digital camera through college, and eventually became bored with it. Just in the last two years I finally got into B&W photography. I always wanted to take photography class in high school, but the prerequisite was two years of studio art and there wasn't enough time to fit it all in before graduation. After finding a Yashica FX-3 at a garage sale two years ago, I decided to make an investment and jump into B&W head-on. Did lots of reading about film development, filters, chemicals, printing, and started putting together my own darkroom. I soon after found a Rolleiflex and started with medium format, loving the smooth contrasty prints that camera gave me. Needless to say the camera collection has grown by leaps and bounds since then! Now I try to get a night in the darkroom at least once a week, and I love it. Resources like APUG (as well as making the usual beginner mistakes along the way) helped me to gain the majority of my knowledge about photography. I participate in the postcard exchange, and while I keep photography as a "serious hobby", I hope to build a portfolio sometime in the future.

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I'm 47. My father gave me an Agfa Isolette when I was ten followed by an Edixa Prismaflex a few years later and then a Nikkormat which was replaced by a Nikon FG. The FG was my only camera for many years.

    I still have the FG and the Edixa.

    In 2003 I tried a Nikon D100 but soon went back to film and started buying cameras. My collection got up to about thirty. At the same time, my father also started collecting and gathered together about the same number but of a better quality than mine.

    I have now inherited my father's collection and intend to use as many of them as I can.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 06-13-2012 at 12:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18

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    I'm 47. I shot film with a point and shoot as a youngster, until the late 80s. I then got a Minolta SLR, put it on auto and shot that for a couple years. I then went to digital point and shoots. About a year and a half ago I started seriously learning to shoot with a DSLR. I just started using manual film cameras a month or so ago and have developed one whole roll of B&W. The only thing I've used my DSLR for, since I got my SLR, is for testing lenses, etc. I'm going to be selling off some of my digital equipment to fund film equipment purchases soon, but I can't say I'm going totally analog. I don't feel as though I'm just "enthralled with something new" here. I really like the act of taking photographs with an analog camera over digital.
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  9. #19
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    I'm 22. Started to dabble in photography when I was 19 I think (started with digi). I tried photography because of the abundance of exotic wildlife in the place that I used to stay. Then some friends introduced me to film, and I have now been shooting all film for 2 years. Hopefully in the future I can try color printing.

  10. #20
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    46. Started with film and motion picture film. Shot a bunch of b movies on 16 and 35mm. Expanded into commercial still photography when I got tired of the movie biz. At the time it was still all film, and digital was an expensive joke. Gradually incorporated digital as client (agency) demand dictated. Still offer clients both formats. Majority of food still shot on film (4x5), it's a reputation thing.
    Catalog work and web work has of course gone all digital.I have found offering clients a choice is good business no matter what they choose, but my clients (agency art directors, etc.) are generally more sophisticated photography wise than if I did portraits, etc. I have dabbled in portraits/weddings that and found the client taste to be rather cheap and pedestrian, but that may just be the market I'm in. I did find the efficiency aspect of computer imaging to be superior, meaning throughput ability, but as it evolved people expected more for less, so it became sort of a wash, again, my market, being full of unsophisticated soccer mom "photographers" and other unwitting competing money losers is I feel a large part of the culprit. I learned to virtually ignore messages from client direct that asked prices before even speaking in person.

    Almost everything I do for creative expression is shot on film, but that is because I consider myself a printer when it comes to analog first and foremost, and I get little satisfaction from making inkjet prints from an art and craft aspect. I have never been impressed with persons who cite technical "quality" as a decision maker, because both formats are adequate in the hands of a talented and trained person. I strive for "qualities" instead. Digi processes to create prints that mimic analog leave me absolutely bored to mononucleosis like levels. I like working with my hands and "making" something, rather than a process I "guide" while something else does the work. If that doesn't make sense it simply means your brain is different than mine, nothing more. I simply have preferences, not convictions. People who try to argue me out of my analog preference might as well try and convince me that I like brussel sprouts and dislike female breasts, so unless I suffer a blow to the head I'll continue to shoot film whenever requested or preferred.

    I feel this sentiment of mine is the main reason I and most people continue with film, why film will continue as a viable product albiet on a reduced level from past choices, and why debate or worry, particularly on APUG, is rather inane.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 06-13-2012 at 03:39 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    That's just, like, my opinion, man...

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