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  1. #11

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    Bracketing? +/- 2/3 (but only with slide film). It has been my experience over the years that even minor changes in exposure - when shooting transparency film - can lead to markedly different results. Film is cheap and I would much rather burn a little extra bit of film than miss getting the shot I wanted...

  2. #12

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    i mostly use cameras these days that don't vary in shutter speed
    and i don't bother closing or opening the lens ( or if the cameras
    do have that feature available just the same ... i don't bother bracketing.
    Last edited by jnanian; 07-01-2012 at 08:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  3. #13
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Nope, no bracketing. With negative film for anyone who has even reasonable metering practices, I find it actually a bit silly.

    There are reasons to shoot a second shot, for example a film/emulsion defect can make a nice shot hard to work, having an identical spare is handy for high value shots.

    And I'm with Blansky, at risk of being pedantic too I'll suggest calling a spade a spade makes for better communication.

    Bracketing is an exposure thing.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    I shoot mostly B&W.

    Unless it is a very difficult lighting situation like backlit or really confusing mixed lighting condition, I don't feel the need to bracket. B&W film is flexible enough to deal with this.

    If I think a multiple good composition exists, then I take multiple shots from varying angles but I don't call that bracketing. I'll shoot shots until I'm satisfied I've covered enough. I'm not good enough to take one shot and let that be the best shot I can take - composition wise, that is. Also... I had several occasions where a frame was damaged during handling and I have to use another frame. Having similar or the same image on a roll helps as an insurance.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    No bracketing, not even for chromes. Get your metering right and you don't need to bracket.

    (I had 1 bad frame from about 300 on my last trip)
    I don't bracket just to avoid bad frames.

    Although in high SBR situations it can certainly help.

    I bracket in order to obtain different frames - to obtain results that emphasize different parts of the scene in slightly different ways.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
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    I do not bracket exposure, I do not experiment, I ascertain what I think is dead center and keep it there.
    I average 10-15 frames for a given look, usually over two rolls of film. I check at the swap to verify that my aperture and shutter speed does not require adjustment.
    The frames usually vary by both angle and distance to subject (I shoot primes). Full length, 3/4s and head and shoulders.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Although in high SBR situations it can certainly help.
    I need help with this vocabulary: High SBR

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeblues View Post
    I need help with this vocabulary: High SBR
    Oops - decent into jargon - my apologies.

    "Scene Brightness Range": this means the range of brightnesses in your scene, from the darkest shadows (with interesting detail) to the brightest highlights (also with interesting detail).

    Film materials like popular black and white or colour negative film are capable of recording a scene with a very wide range of brightnesses (a "high SBR") in a usable way - you can wring a quality print out of them using common darkroom techniques.

    Whereas transparency materials force you to make choices when you encounter a very wide range of brightnesses - you will lose shadow detail if you expose to retain detail in the highlights.

    On the other hand, a projected transparency will display a wider range of brightnesses than a viewed print.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
    jakeblues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Oops - decent into jargon - my apologies.

    "Scene Brightness Range": this means the range of brightnesses in your scene, from the darkest shadows (with interesting detail) to the brightest highlights (also with interesting detail).

    Film materials like popular black and white or colour negative film are capable of recording a scene with a very wide range of brightnesses (a "high SBR") in a usable way - you can wring a quality print out of them using common darkroom techniques.

    Whereas transparency materials force you to make choices when you encounter a very wide range of brightnesses - you will lose shadow detail if you expose to retain detail in the highlights.

    On the other hand, a projected transparency will display a wider range of brightnesses than a viewed print.
    Gotcha.

  10. #20

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    I don't bracket but will certainly shoot a (near) identical 2nd frame for back up, especially if the camera is hand held and to lessen risk of damage to the neg during development or general handling.

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