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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    I think a lot of this comes from large format people who are very anal in how they shoot and take a lot of time to make the shot. They also pride themselves on not cropping (obviously for contact printing) and on a very deliberate approach.

    Being a recipient of Murphys Law for a long time, I always over shoot whatever I do. Just in case....
    Yes. With 8x10 Tri-X going for six dollars per sheet, (and this doesn't include processing and printing) one tends to meter carefully, keep the shutters functioning as they should, and above all think about what one is doing. This approach trickles down to smaller formats as well. On a one month trip to Germany, not one frame of 35mm Agfachrome 100 transparency was lost. I don't bracket because I don't need to; when I was working semi-professionally I would expose insurance duplicates of complex setups.(I did a fair amont of product photography.)
    Also, "careful" and "methodical" do not mean "anal".

  2. #62
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Also, "careful" and "methodical" do not mean "anal".
    Well defined, well practiced, well executed, industrial quality processes that can be used without doubt about the outcome are very freeing. If you aren't worried about the tools and processes working you can focus more on things like composition and content.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Well defined, well practiced, well executed, industrial quality processes that can be used without doubt about the outcome are very freeing. If you aren't worried about the tools and processes working you can focus more on things like composition and content.
    Precisely. Thank you.

  4. #64
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    But stuff still happens -- from the moment one loads the film into the holders to when printing with the negative five years later. So I like having a back-up negative. But I also do not use much film, so doubling up is not as significant. I have lost prints to mold, ants and rain...but so far have kept my film in good condition. My sheet film is far better organized and stored than my early MF negatives. And it is time to order some more boxes for the 8x10 negatives. And figure out a long-term solution for storing 11x14 negatives.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #65
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    Bracketing is standard professional practice, not wastage of film by any stretch. Provided you know what you are doing, all brackets will be entirely useable, the only difference is their tone, their mood or the emotive quality they evoke. Bracketing of composition is not as common (or critical) as bracketing of the exposure, as compositional errors can be tweaked later e.g. cropping when printing etc. I have been bracketing my images for decades in 35mm, still do in 6x7 and also 6x17. It gives you the luxury of choice and a pretty good assurance of getting one or more brilliant shots done in tricky conditions (a standard bracket sequence for me is usually 5 or 6, of which 3 or 4 will be used in one way or another; brackets are less essential for negative film as opposed to transparencies because negative emulsions give so much more room to move before the exposure is on the nose.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    But stuff still happens -- from the moment one loads the film into the holders to when printing with the negative five years later. So I like having a back-up negative. But I also do not use much film, so doubling up is not as significant. I have lost prints to mold, ants and rain...but so far have kept my film in good condition. My sheet film is far better organized and stored than my early MF negatives. And it is time to order some more boxes for the 8x10 negatives. And figure out a long-term solution for storing 11x14 negatives.

    Vaughn
    I'm not suggesting that we "not shoot a spare", when a shot is important.

    My thought is simply that we should have a good reason every time we drop the shutter.

    Film defects, dust getting on the film, gusts of wind moving the camera; this type of issue can ruin a great shot or make a lot of work for us later. These kinds of problems though are random, shooting a spare sheet or spare frame can solve real problems that are beyond our control. Insuring we get a high quality shot shows great craftsmanship/professionalism.

    Bracketing is a different beast, it's normal use is to cover our tails when we don't know what exposure is going to work, when we don't trust our system/tools, or when we don't want to figure it out. The first two of these issues typically solve themselves with experience, people grow out of bracketing as their confidence grows. The third case is expensive and shows little craftsmanship/professionalism; in a commercial setting that doesn't work well.

    The bigger problem I see with bracketing is that it doesn't create spares of the "right" shot, all the spares are almost by definition, wrong.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 07-04-2012 at 03:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #67
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    [...]

    The bigger problem I see with bracketing is that it doesn't create spares of the "right" shot, all the spares are almost by definition, wrong.
    How is that so, prey tell??
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #68
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    How is that so, prey tell??
    My thought is that when we drop the shutter we normally have a some expectation of what we want from that shot.

    Even though we may get something workable from a bracketed exposure, it will probably as you suggested above, be a bit different.

    If we don't get the tone, mood, and emotion we planned on, is it still "right"?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #69
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    If you use slides and bracket +1EV and -1 EV you easily have two shots out of three which are badly exposed (the exception being a subject which has a narrow brightness range).

    If you use slides and bracket +0.33 EV and -0.33 EV depending on brightness range you might have three usable shots. Bracketing for "fine tuning" in a commercial shot is certainly sensible.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #70
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    [...]
    If we don't get the tone, mood, and emotion we planned on, is it still "right"?

    Individual photographers will be looking for their own specific qualities in the bracket sequence and the overall exposure will determine how they interpret and find those qualities. The qualities I mentioned are those I generally set out to bring back. There are many others. At a personal and professional level, I do look for an emotive quality to make the image. Failure to bring up that emotive quality is not failure of the image generally. I can look at one or two underexposed images that, 20 years ago I would have rejected, trashed and pulled my hair. Not now, ever. Two (brackets) are scheduled for printing for their reflection of character (as distinct from emotive or tonal or mood qualities). At least with film we cannot be likened to "chimping" as is customary in the alternative process: shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete;shoot, inspect, delete; shoot, inspect, delete, shoot, inspect, delete ... you get the picture...
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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