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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    I have been meaning to start a thread about it, because I think the galleries are pretty much dead.
    Remedy: Contribute more pictures and feedback on other people's work. It's encouraging when others seem to care.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Is it just me, or do I get the impression that APUG is dominated by LF landscape, Ansel Adam lovers?
    I don't agree, I just checked the gallery right now (I know one data point isnt fact or law), but 10 of 30 images had people in them...

    And even if Apug were 99.999% landscape, what does it matter?

    I (not a landscaper who mostly shoot 35) feel welcomed here....do you? Many of us love your work! Why the question?

    I recently attended a APUG meetup (Photostock), I hung out with some nice folks while they did landscape, I shoot my RF of them and such in the field, we got along swimmingly...format is so not important....
    Andy

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    This makes a lot of sense to me, about the view camera and landscape. A lot of photographers, I believe, feel that there's a natural progression to 'graduate' to bigger formats, as if they are better or more impressive. And when they start shooting sheet film, I think they realize how much more time and patience is required to set up a frame, that they sort of progress toward the landscape, to paraphrase Keith's post above, because the subject matter patiently waits for them to be ready.
    This was true for me when I went from 120 to 4x5, and I think it is in that transition that people either go 'woohoo, I found the perfect tool', or 'this isn't working for me'. Since so many people shoot landscape anyway, I just think that it's natural that so many folk shoot landscape with a view camera.

    I cheer every time I see people breaking out of norms, shooting landscape with 35mm Tri-X or does street photography with a Hasselblad.
    I'm really glad you posted this, I always had that same thought pattern about the 'natural progression', probably from my Dad raving about 'professional' medium format cameras when I was a kid. I got (and still get) very frustrated with myself for not being able to produce great work in every field with my 'ultimate' camera... and stepping down a format is admitting failure (or so my over-thinking brain has told me). Even though I do use all my formats as tools to produce a great product, the past few months in particular have been a real revelation that it's okay to use whatever YOU ( I!) feel is the best tool for the job. Your post has helped cement that in my mind. Damn growing up in an artistic community full of 'Jones's!
    ____________________________________________

    My goal in life, is to be as good a person as my dog already thinks I am.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    This makes a lot of sense to me, about the view camera and landscape. A lot of photographers, I believe, feel that there's a natural progression to 'graduate' to bigger formats, as if they are better or more impressive. And when they start shooting sheet film, I think they realize how much more time and patience is required to set up a frame, that they sort of progress toward the landscape, to paraphrase Keith's post above, because the subject matter patiently waits for them to be ready.
    This was true for me when I went from 120 to 4x5, and I think it is in that transition that people either go 'woohoo, I found the perfect tool', or 'this isn't working for me'. Since so many people shoot landscape anyway, I just think that it's natural that so many folk shoot landscape with a view camera.

    I cheer every time I see people breaking out of norms, shooting landscape with 35mm Tri-X or does street photography with a Hasselblad.
    Good post. A few years back, without changing subject matter I decided to take a break from LF, go back to 35mm and see just how far I could push it. It was a great excercise in many ways and along the way I developed and refined some neat tools and techniques for extracting the maximum possible from the smaller negative.

  5. #15

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    sometimes things aren't really what they seem.
    i knew someone once who seemed like a real jerk ..
    and once i took the time to get to know him i realized
    he wasn't really a jerk at all but something else.

  6. #16
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    I don't agree, I just checked the gallery right now (I know one data point isnt fact or law), but 10 of 30 images had people in them...

    And even if Apug were 99.999% landscape, what does it matter?

    I (not a landscaper who mostly shoot 35) feel welcomed here....do you? Many of us love your work! Why the question?

    I recently attended a APUG meetup (Photostock), I hung out with some nice folks while they did landscape, I shoot my RF of them and such in the field, we got along swimmingly...format is so not important....
    Zsas/Andy, don't get me wrong as I did not wish to offend anyone and yes I do feel welcomed here and also appreciate the feedback I get from the gallery. I probably worded my op badly, because as Thomas has pointed out the change of format to LF probably leads as a natural progression for landscape as a subject.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #17

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    it is strange that people think the natural progression of lf is landscape work.
    i always thought the natural progression to largeformat was to do architectural and portrait work.
    i guess it all depends on what one's interests are ... i'd rather do something else with a large camera ...
    and while i have done LF things for a long time, i never do the "slow down and contemplate" routine people often
    suggest happens when one goes up in format either ... not sure what the point is ... if it took me 20mins or 1hour to expose
    a sheet of film, i think i would do something else instead ..

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    it is strange that people think the natural progression of lf is landscape work.
    i always thought the natural progression to largeformat was to do architectural and portrait work.
    i guess it all depends on what one's interests are ... i'd rather do something else with a large camera ...
    and while i have done LF things for a long time, i never do the "slow down and contemplate" routine people often
    suggest happens when one goes up in format either ... not sure what the point is ... if it took me 20mins or 1hour to expose
    a sheet of film, i think i would do something else instead ..
    Ha - it takes me that long to expose a 35mm frame.

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    John, that's how I appreciate large format too. Portraiture or architecture.
    Just out of curiosity, how do you keep your camera focused when you're shooting quickly? I have seen a lot of your work here, and not sure that absolute critical focus is something you care all that much about, but in lieu of shooting something like a Graflex SLR, how do you keep things in focus? That's been my main challenge with using large format, unless it's a stationary object.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I cheer every time I see people breaking out of norms, shooting landscape with 35mm Tri-X or does street photography with a Hasselblad.
    As long as the tool serves a purpose, I agree.

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