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  1. #21
    blansky's Avatar
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    I think the format and subject matter are intertwined in a different way.

    In my experience here a lot of members are either primarily artistic, or primarily engineers. Obviously a tremendous crossover though.

    The whole right side/left side brain thing.

    The artistic types are often more people types and use systems that allow them to shoot people easily.

    The engineering types like the process, tinkering and working with larger formats and often hate photographing people.

    So we get engineering types shooting quietly with a large format camera pointed at subjects that don't talk and move, and we get the artsy fartsy people persons shooting easily moveable cameras at subject that do move and talk.

    And both types are here on APUG, which is very cool.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    John, that's how I appreciate large format too. Portraiture or architecture.
    Just out of curiosity, how do you keep your camera focused when you're shooting quickly? I have seen a lot of your work here, and not sure that absolute critical focus is something you care all that much about, but in lieu of shooting something like a Graflex SLR, how do you keep things in focus? That's been my main challenge with using large format, unless it's a stationary object.
    hi thomas
    do you mean if i am moving or my subject is moving how do i focus ?
    or in general when i am using a large format camera how do i focus quickly ?

    sorry for being confused by your question ...

    john

  3. #23
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I just wish we could all agree and ban Dinesh.


    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    I think the format and subject matter are intertwined in a different way.

    In my experience here a lot of members are either primarily artistic, or primarily engineers. Obviously a tremendous crossover though.

    The whole right side/left side brain thing.

    The artistic types are often more people types and use systems that allow them to shoot people easily.

    The engineering types like the process, tinkering and working with larger formats and often hate photographing people.

    So we get engineering types shooting quietly with a large format camera pointed at subjects that don't talk and move, and we get the artsy fartsy people persons shooting easily moveable cameras at subject that do move and talk.

    And both types are here on APUG, which is very cool.

  4. #24
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi thomas
    do you mean if i am moving or my subject is moving how do i focus ?
    or in general when i am using a large format camera how do i focus quickly ?

    sorry for being confused by your question ...

    john
    Either way, I guess. Sorry if I was unclear. Whether you're moving or the subject is moving - how do you keep things in focus, after you insert the filmholder?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #25

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    I haven't posted a lot in the Gallery, but I'm using a Cambo for street scenes as well as closeups of flowers, plants, and miniatures. I found that I wasn't getting the detail I wanted from 35mm, and figured if I was going to carry around an RB67 kit I might was well go on up to 4x5 and have camera movements.

    My influences are more like Atget and Edward Weston, as opposed to Ansel Adams.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Either way, I guess. Sorry if I was unclear. Whether you're moving or the subject is moving - how do you keep things in focus, after you insert the filmholder?
    it really doesn't matter the format, 110 or 8x10, i usually have something in the distance and something in the foreground that i use as zones, and i have a general idea what the DOF of my lens &c is.
    nothing really changed for me as i went up in film size, just more stuff to remember to do, ( close lens, make sure dark slide is removed/replaced &c ).

    what is it you are having trouble with, locking the focus, the inverted/backwards image ? or just finding something to focus on as an anchor/marker ?


    john

  7. #27
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    it really doesn't matter the format, 110 or 8x10, i usually have something in the distance and something in the foreground that i use as zones, and i have a general idea what the DOF of my lens &c is.
    nothing really changed for me as i went up in film size, just more stuff to remember to do, ( close lens, make sure dark slide is removed/replaced &c ).

    what is it you are having trouble with, locking the focus, the inverted/backwards image ? or just finding something to focus on as an anchor/marker ?


    john
    I like shooting portraits with a 25mm aperture. That's f2 on a 50mm lens, f/4 on a 100mm lens, and for a 210mm lens, that's f/8 - for similar depth of field across formats. As soon as I focus a portrait and have it perfectly, by the time I put the film holder in, reset the lens, remove the darkslide, nine times out of ten the picture isn't in focus anymore, something changed in the frame, or the light is different.

    If I'm shooting something where people or items move in the frame, I can't see where they are in the frame, ten seconds later when I'm ready to expose film.

    Those are the parts that made sheet film completely useless for me, and nothing but a waste of time. Besides, I get almost comparable quality from 120 compared to 4x5 that I really don't see the point. Just a bunch of frustration in setting it up, and time lost - and for what? A lot more money spent per picture, and a very small advantage in image quality...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #28

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    hi thomas

    are you able to "lock" your focus ?
    that is why nothing stays in focus in the first situation
    and partly the second. you have to anticipate movement sometimes

    sometimes there is a knob to turn that locks focus
    othertimes, like with a speed graphic, there is a little lever ... once you focus+lock it
    the focus shouldn't move at all

    since "stuff" is moving it won't be the same anyways ( you , the subject &c )
    that is why i use focus references /zones as i mentioned above.

    i'd look into figuring out how to lock your focus before you give up completely
    but then again, if you would rather use a MF camera or a 35mm, don't bother with the 4x5
    its just a light and money trap

    john

  9. #29
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Interesting question. I love landscapes but am not good at producing good images of them. That being said, I don't feel that the galleries are dominated by Ansel Adam wannabees, but I do get that feeling sometimes in the forums. I certainly haven't been here as long as many others, but I find that the image content of the galleries changes with the seasons -- sometimes a lot of amazing landscapes, or portraits, or alternative work, and sometimes just (to me) uninspiring work. But I like this place because you can get some insightful comments from everyone from rank beginners to darkroom gods, and almost everyone here puts a positive, encouraging (constructive) spin to images, which is not something that I often see elsewhere. I really get inspired by people doing things radically different to what I do, and it is one of the reasons why I like APUG so much.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  10. #30
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi thomas

    are you able to "lock" your focus ?
    that is why nothing stays in focus in the first situation
    and partly the second. you have to anticipate movement sometimes

    sometimes there is a knob to turn that locks focus
    othertimes, like with a speed graphic, there is a little lever ... once you focus+lock it
    the focus shouldn't move at all

    since "stuff" is moving it won't be the same anyways ( you , the subject &c )
    that is why i use focus references /zones as i mentioned above.

    i'd look into figuring out how to lock your focus before you give up completely
    but then again, if you would rather use a MF camera or a 35mm, don't bother with the 4x5
    its just a light and money trap

    john
    Hi John,

    Locking focus isn't a problem at all. It's more about changing the focus of the camera as the subject matter moves - and when you have a film holder in place you can't see through the camera how it affects the picture.

    But I feel like it isn't worth taking it farther. I'm OK using the 5x7 whenever I see something that is a stationary subject, like the patch of cone flowers I have in my front yard. I took pictures of them yesterday with the 5x7. And last time I made portraits with the 5x7, out of ten exposures only two were sharp, because the person in front of the lens had moved ever so slightly, resulting in her cheek bone being sharp, as opposed to her eye. That 80% waste is too much for me, so I have chosen to not use the 5x7 for that type of subject matter anymore.

    You're right - it's just a light and money trap. Thanks for bearing with me.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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