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  1. #1

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    Epiphany in a small contact print.

    This is nothing more than excitement I guess and many will probably say something like , -"oh yeah, I know that"

    Once you get far enough away from a print to not be able to discern the subject of the print you begin to see the patterns and shapes. My prints are 5x7 contacts so I do not need to be very far away, but the prints, of mine, I find to be the most pleasing to me are the ones that have very strong classic shapes: Arches, triangles, lines, etc... I also notice that these are becoming more and more prevelent in my photos. Almost to the point of being blatant. I then took some of my favorite BW photos that I have in books and put them up so I could back away from them. The same is true for those images. I always wondered what drew me to those photographs.

    You can even do this with the photos in the gallery. Just roll your chair back until you cannot discern the subject of the photo. The shapes will really jump out at you.

    Now I just need a dark cloth big enough and a ground glass bright enough for me to view it from like 10 feet away stopped down to my usual f/32. I wonder if rendering the subject just out of focus would give the same results as moving really far away.

    I noticed that I do not actually see color photos this way but it is close; the I seem to use the color to augment and accentuate the shape. I did the digital conversion on a couple of my favorite color shots and they have the strong shapes but they lack a lot. They need color in the photograph.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #2
    donna-marie's Avatar
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    'tis called composition . . .

    I print nothing unless the contact (35mm 0r 120) looks good while squinting . . .

  3. #3

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    colour versus b&w

    B&W images and colour images work in very different ways: the human eye is naturally drawn to high-contrast edges in a monochrome image, and to the centre of bright coloured areas in coloured images. This is why strong geometric shapes (and textures) work better in B&W...

  4. #4
    jovo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carsonius
    This is why strong geometric shapes (and textures) work better in B&W...
    It's more and more evident to me that that is very, very true. The more graphic an image....the better it scans from a distance....the more successful it's likely to be. I seem to be learning that by experience with every image I make that doesn't work very well.

    Robert Glenn Ketchum made a series of color photographs in the early 80's that had his lens plunged into thickets and woodsy copses filled with glowing autumn and winter light. They are a revelation. I've often tried do find a way to do something similar in black and white, but always without success unless there's a really strong graphic element or two to hold it together.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  5. #5
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Never tried that...

    Must. Thank you.

  6. #6

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    mark,

    It's interesting that you bring this up. I've recently begun to defocus my view camera while under the dark cloth to get a better look at the tonal balance in my composition. I've found it a useful step. I've never consciously noticed the geometry of the image, but will look for it now. Thanks for the tip.
    Matt

  7. #7
    James Bleifus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt miller
    I've recently begun to defocus my view camera while under the dark cloth to get a better look at the tonal balance in my composition. I've found it a useful step.
    Matt
    Wow, what a great idea. I'm going to give that a try.

  8. #8
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt miller
    I've recently begun to defocus my view camera while under the dark cloth to get a better look at the tonal balance in my composition.
    I find that I can accomplish the same thing by just taking a step back from the camera and looking at the groundglass without the darkcloth. I do primarly color.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #9

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    Mark,

    The wowondroushing is when you see viewers of small prints get sucked across a room to see what all that gegeometrys really doing to them. It is so much fun to watch. They know that they like some thing but don't no why. Then they discover all the neat little things in the print.

    Jan Pietrzak

  10. #10

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    Mark,

    The wondrous thing is when you see viewers of small prints get sucked across a room to see what all that gegeometrys really doing to them. It is so much fun to watch. They know that they like some thing but don't no why. Then they discover all the neat little things in the print.

    Jan Pietrzak

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