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  1. #51
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    I've never felt self-conscious about shooting with film. I started with film, and I don't see it as some kind of fashion statement. It's film. For me, it's like eating and breathing. Do people ask me about my camera? Yes, because it's large format or medium format. These things are big, and they stand out. "Yes, I can get film for them. Yes, the pictures are very sharp. No, it isn't a Hasselblad."

    Why should anyone feel self-conscious about film? The only thing you should think about are your photographs. Nobody else is making that photograph. It's you. There is no "WWAAD" or "WWGWD" or whatever. Produce good art, whatever you think that is.

  2. #52
    nicholai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian C. Miller View Post
    There is no "WWAAD"
    I guess that's called the zone-system.

  3. #53
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've just gotten used to the stares and the repetitive inquiries I get when shooting big film cameras - haul a 5x12 out in public and see how self-conscious you become. But there's a built-in antidote to that: the darkcloth. When you're under it, focusing, you are absolutely oblivious to the world around you. With smaller film cameras (my Contaxes, both rangefinder and SLR) I sometimes get the whole "do those shoot film" thing but it's often positive feedback. Just shoot what you want and don't worry about the hoi-polloi. As long as you're getting the results you want, nothing else matters.

  4. #54
    ambaker's Avatar
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    I find myself more at ease in public with a film camera, as opposed to digital.

    With digital, they always want to look at the pictures, thus the moment of approval, or disapproval. With film, I am more occupied with getting it right, and after the shot I don't have to show it to anybody. ;-)

  5. #55
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Nope. What's to be self conscious about? I doubt anyone even notices other than other photographers, and most of them are completely sympathetic.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #56
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Self-conscious for using film? At 23? I would have thought at that age a guy couldn't give a stuff what others think (certainly, when I was that age that was my attitude!)
    Seriously, just do what you enjoy doing, and do it well. And rest assured about this: if you're serious about keeping memories, the best of your photographs will still be around when you're 50 or 60 years while those tethered to computers will be rueing the days — many of them, on which they lost their marbles — and their precious pix.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #57
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I agree with post #8.

    Take this feeling as an occasion to free yourself from social "conditioning". Do what you feel like doing. Don't care about what others may think. Generally speaking, interest of people toward your activity will be positive. Any conversation about film absolutely is an occasion to spread the film gospel.

    Film photography is still relatively widespread in Italy so it's not a film camera which would draw much attention. I know the feeling as I often go round with a tripod and that always catches some attention, and sometimes it is also of little disturbance to fellow pedestrians. I am prepared to "interact" with curious people, with fellow photographers, with policemen, with private guards of any kind. I am a shy guy and sometime I would like not to have eyes looking at me. Sometimes it is just inevitable to draw some attention. Just concentrate on what you are doing and "abstract" from disturbances such as the feeling of being observed.

    I use both digital and film. Film gives the best quality for its nice elegant rendition of highlights in particular. Underline that with whomever you talk. Spread the gospel.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #58
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    My first reaction was just to reply with one word, "no."

    My next thought was, "what an odd question, why on earth would I?"

    My third thought was that I'm quite aware of it many times, but more proud than anything, and I'm an extrovert anyway and like engaging people, when I have time. I'm happy to talk about it and why I like it, and if someone finds it mystifying or me odd or old fashion, that's great too because I LIKE being seen as different. To me that means I'm an individual.

    Then I read some and saw the comments about the OP's age and I started to understand the question, at least.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I think it's an interesting question. Shooting film, to me, IS photography. I don't know much about digital cameras, and the only one I own is attached to my iPhone.

    Sometimes I use the light meter that's available for the iPhone when I travel light (it's surprisingly good), and I get some looks sometimes from people who think I'm nuts as it looks like I'm taking a picture with the iGadget, and then another with the film camera.

    In the end, I feel great about what I do. That's all that matters. When people ask about my camera I am usually very forthcoming and respectful about questions. Some go so far as to contest whether it's worth it to still shoot film, with all of the advantages of digital cameras and work flow, and I simply tell them that it gives me a hundred times more satisfaction to shoot film and print in the darkroom, that it's simply much more fun for me. In the same breath I tell folks that I fully understand why others might feel differently, but that I take pride in doing what I feel is right for me, going against the modern trend.
    So, there is no self consciousness going on regarding shooting film. Just pride, a grin on my face because I'm enjoying myself so much, and just a hair of satisfaction that once in a while it spurs a great conversation when people are open minded enough (and I try to return the favor, obviously).
    This may be post of the week. Thomas has a way with words, and also a way of coming across as a very nice and decent person. Well said!

    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I've been thinking about this for a while and I think this has nothing to do with photography or camera - but has everything to do with age.

    OP is in his early 20s.

    In this age, things matter. Being accepted by others matter. Being thought well by others matter. Although legally an adult, one is somewhat unsure of his/her role in the world. No matter how hard one tries, he/she just doesn't have enough life experiences to know if he/she is in the ball-park. Always a thought creeps in.... am I doing this right?

    Come 40s and 50s, one had been through many situations including good, bad, embarrassing, etc, etc, etc. May had a serious illness or even death in close relatives and friends, and begin to realize what's really important. All the sudden, everything else seem insignificant. By this stage, typically, one knows what he wants and makes decisions.

    I'll let you know what 60s and 70s are like when I get there.
    This is my experience and feeling after reading this too, and I'm in the same general age group, a week short of 49.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Self-conscious for using film? At 23? I would have thought at that age a guy couldn't give a stuff what others think (certainly, when I was that age that was my attitude!)
    Seriously, just do what you enjoy doing, and do it well. And rest assured about this: if you're serious about keeping memories, the best of your photographs will still be around when you're 50 or 60 years while those tethered to computers will be rueing the days — many of them, on which they lost their marbles — and their precious pix.
    That's how I felt then too. Somewhere along the line, the idea of young people pointedly not caring what others thought, making it a point to the extent of going out of their way to make others see them as non-conformists (even to the point of conforming to the non-conformity of the day!) fell by the wayside. It's rather sad to see it from this side of 30.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I wouldn't wanted anyone to think I was cool!


    Steve.
    Word!

    Er, I mean, I completely agree, sir.
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 08-11-2012 at 01:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #59
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    A few years ago, someone I know stated "everyone does something which someone else will think is strange". So don't worry about. Do what you want.


    Steve.
    Not everyone. Just the interesting people who are worthwhile getting to know.

    I'm involved in so many things people think are odd I've lost track.

    While neighbors light up their yards in the mistaken belief that too much light deters crime I rant about light pollution and looking forward to the day I can retire to a dark sky sight and make getting a decent telescope worthwhile again.

    I spend an unjustifable amount of money to rent and fly, and maybe buy before too long, small airplanes, amongst people who think it's absurdly dangerous (it isn't - compares closely to motorcycling but the main risk factors are controllable and with some care you can make it almost comparable to driving) absurdly expensive (well, they're right about that but it's worth it to me and I do it) and don't understand the appeal (flying to me is spiritual. Really.)

    I browse old radio gear for sale and plan to set up my ham shack again, soon as I get the basement built out and have room down there - it will also make the darkroom much better to get it sealed off properly and running water in it.

    Heck, I used to be in the Society for Creative Anachronism and made real armor, rattan swords and other weapons, and engage in a very peculiar martial art along with medieval reenactment (well, sort of) on weekends, and still have many friends who are involved.

    I'm sure I could think of more. At some point I started realizing that many people were very boring and I really don't care to waste my time with the sort of folks who work, watch TV in the evening, drink on the weekends, lather rinse and repeat.

  10. #60
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post

    Originally Posted by Steve Smith

    [quuote]I wouldn't wanted anyone to think I was cool!



    Word!

    Er, I mean, I completely agree, sir. [/QUOTE]

    I think I was writing in both the past and present tense simultaneously (and at the same time).


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.



 

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