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  1. #41
    Maris's Avatar
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    It's a curious fact that customary units in the USA are actually defined within the metric system. For example the length of the US yard is exactly 3600/3937 metres and the pound is exactly 0.453 592 4277 Kilograms. The change happened in the Mendenhall Order of 1893. An inch may be a convenient unit but you have to ask the metric system to be sure how long it is!
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  2. #42
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Here's a clue as to who is right and who is wrong.... It's called English!!!


    Steve.

  3. #43
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Perhaps if the english hadn't been so intent on cozying up to europe and prove that the english were europeans too they would also still be using the English system.
    We do. All of our road signs are in yards and miles. People of my age are happy using both systems. I use metric for engineering and imperial for house building.

    (English capitalised as it should be),

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    So my next question would be, when you specify 5x4...

    Are you doing it because you are specifying the long dimension first?

    Or are you specifying the height first?
    In my opinion, it's the long dimension first. The same as specifying x then y on a graph.

    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    The real question is why are your fries called chips, and why are your chips called crisps, and why (in America) if you want fish and fries, you have to order fish and chips?
    As ever, because we are right and you are wrong! What you refer to as fries are probably not real French fries as they are traditionally fried twice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Liter formulas for Europe
    Litre.

    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    Metric! Our money is metric
    Why do Americans refer to 1/4 as a fourth but refer to a 25 cent coin as a quarter? And whilst I'm thinking about coinage, why do you use the English penny to describe a one cent coin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    But it is so fun to say "my bad"
    That one is really annoying (not real annoying as Americans say!). It is not possible to own an adjective.


    There. I think I have caught up with everything I missed last night!


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 08-27-2012 at 02:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    As usual America bastardized the language.

    In theory we call a vertical, a 4x5 and a horizontal a 5x4.

    Although since most Americans are barely educated even with a college degree, we call an 8x10 (vertical) portrait format, and a 10x8, an 8x10 landscape format.

    So a horizontal 10x8 print is called 8x10 landscape even if it's a portrait.

    Although we do know that a car does not wear a boot or a bonnet and we correctly refer to them as a trunk and a hood.
    Do they climb in the boot or bonnet to make a trunk call?
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    Because then we would have to admit someone else is right...

    Metric! Our money is metric, that's all that is needed.
    Our money isn't metric- it's decimal.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #46
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    In architectural drafting, US, a window specified at 4.0 3.0 is four feet wide by three feet high.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  7. #47
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    In Italy I would say that the shorter dimension is always given first.
    135 is 24 x 36.
    120 roll film can be framed in 4,5x6, 6x6, 6x7, 6x9.
    Never heard "nove per sei" or "sette per sei".
    4,5x6 is always pronounced "quattroemmezzosei" with one word.

    A4 is 21 x 29,7 cm etc.

    Building conventions are certainly different as a window cannot be rotated like a piece of paper.

    I don't see how or when non-metric measures can be more practical than metric measures. They both are entirely conventional, but the metric convention has the obvious advantage of being decimal. If a window weights 32 kilograms, a container with 1000 windows will weight 32 metric tons.

    If your gas station reservoir needs to satisfy 2000 clients for a 40 litres average refill before refilling the reservoir, it needs to have a volume of 80 cubic metres. That's let's say 2 metres high for 4x5 metres of base. Fast and easy.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #48
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    it needs to have a volume of 80 cubic metres. That's let's say 2 metres high for 4x5 metres of base. Fast and easy.
    Fast, easy and wrong!

    4x5x2 = 40


    Steve.

  9. #49
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    "We are two country s separated by a common language", for example I once found out to my cost that to " knock someone up" which in the U.K.means to wake somebody up by knocking on their door or window which originated in the Lancashire mill towns where the mills employed " knockerupers" who used a long pole to tap on the mill workers windows to wake them in the morning for the early shift means something completely different in the U.S, I found this out once when in a pub I offered to "knock up" an American friends wife on my way to work the next morning
    Ben

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    We do. All of our road signs are in yards and miles. People of my age are happy using both systems. I use metric for engineering and imperial for house building.

    (English capitalised as it should be),



    In my opinion, it's the long dimension first. The same as specifying x then y on a graph.



    As ever, because we are right and you are wrong! What you refer to as fries are probably not real French fries as they are traditionally fried twice.



    Litre.



    Why do Americans refer to 1/4 as a fourth but refer to a 25 cent coin as a quarter? And whilst I'm thinking about coinage, why do you use the English penny to describe a one cent coin?



    That one is really annoying (not real annoying as Americans say!). It is not possible to own an adjective.


    There. I think I have caught up with everything I missed last night!


    Steve.
    When I read this I mentally "pronounced" it as "refer to a quarter as a fourth..." then was briefly confused. 1/4 may be called a quarter or a fourth. Some of this is age dependent. I am more likely to call it a quarter and my wife, who is enough younger to have newer speech patterns, is more likely to say "a fourth."

    I sometimes reply to people who say "my bad" by asking, "your bad WHAT?"



 

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