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  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    "Sittin' in a railway station,
    Got a ticket for my destination.
    On a tour of one-night stands,
    My suitcase and guitar in hand."

    Would make a good song.

    But it would not work at all with 'train station'.

    - Leigh
    Similarly,
    "I lay my head on the railroad tracks
    And wait for the double E
    But the railroad don't run no more,
    Poor poor pitiful me"

    could work either way, railroad or railway, but railroad works better.

  2. #82
    zsas's Avatar
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    Train
    Train Track
    Train Station
    They are kept at the railyard


    If one said, "How are you getting up north?" The reply would be, "I'm taking the northern line." or maybe, "I'm taking the northern train line."
    Andy

  3. #83

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    In the verb form,
    "Railroadin' on the Great Divide
    Nothin' around me but Rockies and sky"
    would be horrible with "way".

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    On the subject of trains - When I was a child, everyone referred to those places trains stop at to let people on and off as railway stations. Now they call them train stations which doesn't sound right. I think it's another Americanised thing over here.

    Oh yes, you call them railroads don't you?!!


    Steve.
    Yes but don't forget in "merica" they also call a mass transit "people hauler" (rapid transit) a train even if a downtown above ground subway (WHAT???).

    Some people also differentiate a railway car and a train car by if it's a people or freight hauler.

    Also some people call those things trains travel on as railway tracks.

    BUT all these words for the same things make it possible for people who write lyrics to songs to have synonyms to help with the whole rhyming thing.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  5. #85

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    The above-ground (and subway) CTA "El" systems in Chicago are, in fact, "heavy rail", with the same technical standards as mainline railroads.
    Steetcar systems (such as San Diego, Portland, and Boston) are "light rail".
    Many people confuse subway and surface lines in Chicago and New York with "light rail".
    A "train" is legally "that which is between the markers", or informally, a set of cars coupled together.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    "Sittin' in a railway station,
    Got a ticket for my destination.
    On a tour of one-night stands,
    My suitcase and guitar in hand."

    Would make a good song.

    But it would not work at all with 'train station'.

    - Leigh
    Paul Simon actually wrote that song "Homeward Bound" while sitting in a railway station in Widnes Lancashire in the U.K
    Ben

  7. #87

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    Another folk song:
    "The Lord made me,
    The Lord made you.
    He must have made the CB&Q.
    For in the Bible, the psalmist sings,
    'The Lord he made all creeping things'."
    [CB&Q = Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, now part of Burlington Northern Santa Fe]

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    According to Inspector Lewis and Sgt. Hathaway, there is one murder in Oxford each week during the new series airing on TV. Wonder what those students are up to? In the US, before time zones, travellers used to set their watches based on the conductors announcements, as they moved east or west.

    Consider bonnet and hood. A bonnet is removable and a hood is attached. So, which is the best definition for a car?

    PE
    In Victorian times in the U.K we had railway time, when each company had it's own time.
    Ben

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    In the US, (and the rest of the world) each town set it's clocks according to the true local time, usually ascertained by the suns' zenith.
    Can you say "Sanford Fleming", eh?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Ben, Doesn't Great Tom still peal at 9:05 PM instead of 9?
    Yes it does Brian that's just traditional it rings 101 times a day to commemorate the original 100 scholars +1 it was the archaic Oxford time.
    Ben



 

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