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  1. #61

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    Back in the days when I was a younger and much fitter man (with knees that worked) and living in my native north of England, I used to do a lot of fell walking in the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales, Peak District and, when I moved up there, Scotland.

    So long as you have emergency rations, water, shelter, warm clothing and you know how to use a map and compass (especially in bad weather) you should be fine.

    Wild camping is great fun but don't forget that it's not universally legal in the UK and it's always best to ask for permission (and tips on the best places) - especially in National Parks. One issue to become good at, is not leaving a mess. The link is a really worthwhile book that will ensure you are as enviro-friendly as you can possibly be.

    http://www.amazon.com/Shit-Woods-Sec.../dp/0898156270

    My suggestion for camera gear is start small and see how you get on. I used to find lugging a Mamiya C330 was a pain - but if you can manage a 5x4, then why not....?

    Enjoy......
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  2. #62
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PentaxBronica View Post
    I'd just take the smallest 35mm body with lenses around 28/50/135mm and as much film as you can sensibly fit into your pack (after the essentials, obviously).
    <snip> it takes a while to get anywhere, but that's part of the fun.
    Got a (train) ticket to ride, so will be heading up to the Lakes for the first week of November. Camera of choice will be a Wista 5x4 along with 135/180/300mm lenses (haven't decided on the 90mm yet) and a tripod. Hopefully, the tent/sleeping bag(s) will weigh less than the camera gear.

    Being on foot and most of the spots I plan on visiting are well away from roads or green lanes, I may be gone some time...

  3. #63
    coigach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    Got a (train) ticket to ride, so will be heading up to the Lakes for the first week of November. Camera of choice will be a Wista 5x4 along with 135/180/300mm lenses (haven't decided on the 90mm yet) and a tripod. Hopefully, the tent/sleeping bag(s) will weigh less than the camera gear.

    Being on foot and most of the spots I plan on visiting are well away from roads or green lanes, I may be gone some time...
    Have fun.

    Look forward to seeing some pictures. Autumn colours are starting to turn nice here in the Scottish Highlands now, hopefully the same for you in the Lakes...

  4. #64
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Well, depending on the weather I will be going on another backpack trip with one of my boys and his high school backpacking club. On the last trip I took with them (last month) I took the 4x5 and 5 loaded holders -- only took one shot and I think it is a keeper (proof will be in the printing!)

    If the rain coming in holds off, we'll go -- up into the Trinity Alps (Canyon Creek, but short of the lakes). Just 5 miles in and I'll take the 4 holders I did not use last trip. They are still loaded up with the out-dated Tech Pan. It is working out well! It should be a little more photographically scenic for me than the last trip...tho it was beautiful. I was just too lazy to go the extra distance after arriving to reach something I was more interested in photographing.

    Dang kids and their fit teacher! I'll be bringing up the rear -- you need a 'sweeper' to make sure you don't lose any kids -- the parents are a bear to deal with! LOL!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Around the Keswick area in Cumbria before the end of the month hopefully. Pembrokeshire is a plan too. Then Cairngorms - but it's getting to that time of year where Scotland might be a bit of a gamble with the weather. The places I've chosen are relatively close to campsites, as a fallback plan. But just trying it out locally first.
    Be _very_ careful with the Cairngorms at this time of year.

    At over 4000 feet, the weather can change dramatically on the Cairngorm plateau in 30 minutes and I've seen snow in July.

    This is not like the Lake district (fine though it is); the climate on the Cairngorm plateau can best be described as sub-arctic.

    My late father, a very experienced hillwalker introduced me to these mountains in my teens so I have great affection for them.

    But they're deceptively undramatic from ground level so for the above reasons, not for the inexperienced.

    Having said all that, I wish you well with your journeys and look forward to seeing your images.

  6. #66

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    I'm with Flying Camera, I don't like to walk very far.

    Jeff

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Definitely plan on learning the 'art' of wild camping first and you're right about going along with others before solo. There's certainly a bit more to it in terms of remaining inconspicuous over here, as others have said. It can be frowned upon in certain national parks in the UK. Hence the term 'wild camping' - a bit of a taboo.
    My rig for low-level wild camping is the bottom left photo on this page.

    Using a DD hammock and DPM basha means I can setup 150 feet into the trees and the camp will be invisible to anyone from the trail.

    Much nicer waking up surrounded by forest rather than enclosed in a tent and helps leave no trace.

    Wood burning kettle means I don't have to carry fuel for cooking, leaving room for my Zero Image panoramic, Berlebach tripod, film, etc.

    The more experience developed, the simpler your kit becomes.

    But always go for the best quality you can afford for the items you carry.
    Last edited by Woolly; 12-17-2012 at 09:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #68

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    I think a TLR is the best performance/weight tradeoff for backcountry photography, on the whole. Large format is more of a "work out of the car" proposition, unless you have a really compact kit; I've carried a whole mess of plate-camera stuff miles into the desert on a hot summer's day, and while it *worked*, I have to say it wasn't really worth the blood, sweat, and tears as compared to medium format.

    For me, water is the big contributor to weight and limits the length of a trip: one to two gallons per day, at eight pounds to the gallon, and it outweighs the camera gear mighty quickly. If you have access to drinkable water in the field, that makes an enormous difference in packing, and the pack space I devote to water would probably allow you to take a 16x20! :-)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolly View Post
    Be _very_ careful with the Cairngorms at this time of year.

    At over 4000 feet, the weather can change dramatically on the Cairngorm plateau in 30 minutes and I've seen snow in July.

    This is not like the Lake district (fine though it is); the climate on the Cairngorm plateau can best be described as sub-arctic.

    My late father, a very experienced hillwalker introduced me to these mountains in my teens so I have great affection for them.

    But they're deceptively undramatic from ground level so for the above reasons, not for the inexperienced.

    Having said all that, I wish you well with your journeys and look forward to seeing your images.
    Sounds like my kind of place, I live for that kind of weather..:-)
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  10. #70
    Jeff L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    I hiked 90 miles with nothing but a Rollei 35. Got some worthwhile shots...

    Attachment 56881
    nice!

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