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  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Naming a Photographic Company or Product

    I understand that the name KODAK was a word that originally meant nothing, but was formulated by George Eastman one day, when playing an anagram game with his mother. He thought the letters were strong and decisive. A brilliant bit of marketing for its time, but wondered if others could come up with an imaginary name for a photographic product or service?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2

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    I'm not very imaginative so I'm out... but the use of yellow by Kodak violates some "old and well-established rule of marketting" that belives that yellow is a very ineffective color to use.

  3. #3
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I'm not very imaginative so I'm out... but the use of yellow by Kodak violates some "old and well-established rule of marketting" that belives that yellow is a very ineffective color to use.
    Tell that to Vincent Van Gogh.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  4. #4

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    Ya, color theory is an interesting thing. It works "both ways" it seems. Both research and practice are confusing.

  5. #5
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    I would make it black and white and call it ilford. O yea, somebody already did that.

  6. #6
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    The problem I see is that neologisms are the norm, today, rather than the exception.

    Back in Eastman's day, newfangled, made-up words were not so common. Even the invented words that were used made some kind of sense. "Dagurerrotype," for instance. "Photograph," even.

    Nowadays, we have names like "Kleenex" and "Band-Aid" that are so commonly used that we use them as household words. Names like "Nutri-Sweet" or "Truvia" just blend into the background.

    Even acronyms ("scuba" = "self-contained underwater breathing apparatus") or initialisms ("ATM" = "Automatic Teller Machine") can be so common as to be meaningless.

    It's not like the old days when a good strong name could make a company. Today, everybody's doing it. In fact, I'd say that it's now the other way around. The reputation of the company can redefine the word. (e.g. "Google" which should be "googol.")

    I think the best bet would be to use a name as part of the company brand like "Jones Photographic Company."
    Last edited by Worker 11811; 09-30-2012 at 07:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Randy S.

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    Since the trend with film companies is a four letter, phonetic nonsense name - even Lomo - children usually have the best minds for this. What about PLOP? Nobody forgets a good plop.

  8. #8
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    The reputation of the company can redefine the word. (e.g. "Google" which should be "googol.")
    I agree "Googol" is much better.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #9

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    I think the argument there would be that the 'le' gives it more credibility in the English language. It sounds more like a common word that way.

  10. #10
    cliveh's Avatar
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    OK, here is mine for a new camera - The ZEBOX.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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