Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,702   Posts: 1,548,460   Online: 883
      
Page 1 of 15 123456711 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 143

Thread: Fine Art Status

  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,356
    Images
    343

    Fine Art Status

    Will the continued use of digital photography elevate more film photography to a fine art status in the future? I’m thinking here in terms of a comparison to painting when photography came along. I would like to think so.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,608
    Images
    122
    Generally, people's perception and value of anything now is a lot less than it used to be.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,923
    Most people don't care how the image was taken - film or digital. It's a photograph - not a film photograph and digital photograph.

    Most people also don't care if it was taken by Nikon, Canon, Hasselblad, or whatever else brand. It's a photograph.

    I think it's just us, the enthusiasts, put so much emphasis in equipment and method.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Would that it were so. It hasn't yet, and any objective evidence, as in a visit to virtually any gallery, indicates exactly the opposite is the case.

    Ironically (frustratingly?), the outgoing photography curator of the Getty (Weston Neff) advised newcomers a couple of years ago to "get into the darkroom", but the new staff doesn't seem to have much appreciation for contemporary photography other than that which employs digital process.

  5. #5
    Vincent Brady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Co. Kildare - Ireland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,002
    Images
    169
    Surely photography is not that highly rated among the general public. At photo exhibitions guys visiting it are inclined to think that they can do just as good as the photos they view if they only took their time when shooting. With more photographers than ever taking part in the hobby it is hard to see it gaining extra appreciation.

  6. #6
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,420
    Images
    214
    I don't know about "fine art status" but, I think there is a new appreciation for traditional photography. I've been doing art festivals for about 2 decades. In the last few years, I've seen an increase in people looking for darkroom produced work. In talking to my buyers, one of the reasons they give for purchasing is the hand-crafted manner in which it was produced. As it becomes more rare, there's an increased perception of its value.

  7. #7
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Geelong & Castlemaine, Victoria, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,596
    Images
    15
    Film/analogue photography of a very high technical, aesthetic and overall production standard will always be considered as bespoke fine art, but how it is produced, via digital or analogue, will be the tipping point. There is no evidence I can see that digital prints have been assigned "fine art" status, and those produced in traditional wet darkrooms, colour or monochrome, have a higher appreciation in the public eye, even if the means by which they are produced does not 'register' as modern/fine art. Ilfochrome Classic prints, conservation frramed, are analogue in their production from start to finish and not just speaking of my own sales but that of fellow professionals when we were all printing to this media, it sold very well and consistently high values (all things else being equal, it was not just the media, but the holistic 'vision' of the image) and remains the benchmark for photographic fine art. As Ilfochrome no longer exists, people owning these images are treating them as an investment that will likely appreciate in time because the image cannot be made again to that liking, only via alternative digital means. Of course, B&W darkroom-produced work can also have a high value, but everything must come together to be able to present it as fine art to an increasingly naive public hoodwinked by this digital crap.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #8
    MaximusM3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    756
    Images
    7
    You got that right, Tkamiya. These arguments are the life and blood of internet forums but reality is much different. The value is in the image and the print. It may be from film, digital, but printed traditionally on silver, or using any hybrid process. The craft is in making a good print, of an image that moves someone. That's where value is, and not in the medium used to record it. As a personal example, this weekend, one the galleries with my work, sold three copper plate photogravure prints of mine. None of the three buyers asked, or was remotely concerned with how the image originated, what camera, film, whatever, I had used. They loved the images, and they loved the prints. I, of course, use a hybrid process to arrive at the film positive required, but again, in the real world, who really cares?
    To answer Clive, digital photography is, and will be, increasing the distinction between those who are willing to commit time and effort to create a quality print, and those who don't, therefore elevating the value of analogue prints, also using hybrid processes. Of course, we can argue about whether a fully analogue print, one that was created with sweat and tears in the darkroom, dodging and burning, is more valuable. To the artist it may be, but again, potential buyers don't really care. Let's face it, as Vincent pointed out, photography, with very few exceptions (if any), is not in the same realm as paintings when it comes to collectable value, and probably never will be, simply because the skills required to "take" a decent photograph these days are pretty low. So, assuming one's goal is to actually invest time, money and effort into selling art, the question to ask is whether you feel film or digital would make a difference. My answer would have to be no. It is simply a choice at this point, and, in my opinion, time is better invested in finding what to shoot and how to shoot it (nurture creativity), instead of worrying about what to shoot it WITH, and more importantly bring the image to life with a beautiful print that is unique and handmade, not an inkjet. This is, of course, my opinion only, so feel free to throw rocks
    Last edited by MaximusM3; 10-14-2012 at 05:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
    MaximusM3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    756
    Images
    7
    Coincidentally, this article just appeared on CNN:http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/14/opinio...html?hpt=hp_c1


    "Smartphones have democratized photography, and Instagram, in particular, has given us an unprecedented platform for our snapshots. But instead of marveling at all the choices, there's some grumbling. Some professionals feel threatened as they see the playing field leveling; they interpret it as the end of skill and craft in photography. They should have no fear of such a thing.
    Photography is rooted in the rich culture of amateurism. What's happening today is similar to the original proliferation of Kodak's Brownie camera starting in 1900. An inexpensive and easy-to-use camera in every hand didn't usher in the end of photography or automatically turn everybody into Richard Avedon.

    Photo apps won't magically give Jane the smartphone photographer a better sense of composition, or lighting, or framing. The apps and filters only change a photo's look and aesthetic feel. That doesn't make it a better photo. If you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig."

  10. #10
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,356
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by MaximusM3 View Post
    Coincidentally, this article just appeared on CNN:http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/14/opinio...html?hpt=hp_c1


    "Smartphones have democratized photography, and Instagram, in particular, has given us an unprecedented platform for our snapshots. But instead of marveling at all the choices, there's some grumbling. Some professionals feel threatened as they see the playing field leveling; they interpret it as the end of skill and craft in photography. They should have no fear of such a thing.
    Photography is rooted in the rich culture of amateurism. What's happening today is similar to the original proliferation of Kodak's Brownie camera starting in 1900. An inexpensive and easy-to-use camera in every hand didn't usher in the end of photography or automatically turn everybody into Richard Avedon.

    Photo apps won't magically give Jane the smartphone photographer a better sense of composition, or lighting, or framing. The apps and filters only change a photo's look and aesthetic feel. That doesn't make it a better photo. If you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig."
    Well said.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

Page 1 of 15 123456711 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin