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  1. #1

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    Facebook picture sabotage...

    Being of a certain age, I often upload my photographs to Facebook and I'll admit, it's all about shameless validation. Today I uploaded an image (linked below) and a friend made an edit, uploaded and tagged me in it. I could see the humour in what he did, but the 'maker' got a little sensitive. He superimposed my face above the hedge in the picture, implying I'm a peeping Tom. I played along in the comments, but untagged myself as not to ruin my credibility as a 'serious artist'. Silly, I know, but I'm sure you can understand that I didn't want anyone else to see his edit after I'd uploaded the original.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YHR8s62g8s...gs/s1600/1.jpg

    I've been taking my photography very seriously for a while now, perhaps too seriously, as this Facebook thing suggests. I recall something photographer David Ward wrote about an incident with one of his images - an art buyer quipped upon seeing his photograph "oh look, a turd on the beach" (picture in question - http://bp3.blogger.com/_aXtCQUvQNns/...lbeg+beach.jpg)

    Has anybody else had nasty remarks about pictures you've presented? Particularly images you're proud of. Do you take it as a hard lesson, allowing it to influence the kind of pictures you make or simply shrug it off?
    Last edited by batwister; 10-18-2012 at 01:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Being of a certain age, I often upload my photographs to Facebook and I'll admit, it's all about shameless validation. Today I uploaded an image (linked below) and a friend made an edit, uploaded and tagged me in it. I could see the humour in what he did, but the 'maker' got a little sensitive. He superimposed my face above the hedge in the picture, implying I'm a peeping Tom. I played along in the comments, but untagged myself as not to ruin my credibility as a 'serious artist'. Silly, I know, but I'm sure you can understand that I didn't want anyone else to see his edit after I'd uploaded the original.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YHR8s62g8s...gs/s1600/1.jpg

    I've been taking my photography very seriously for a while now, perhaps too seriously, as this Facebook thing suggests. I recall something photographer David Ward wrote about an incident with one of his images - an art buyer quipped upon seeing his photograph "oh look, a turd on the beach" (picture in question - http://bp3.blogger.com/_aXtCQUvQNns/...lbeg+beach.jpg)

    Has anybody else had nasty remarks or backhanded compliments about pictures you've presented? Particularly images you're proud of? Do you shrug it off or cry a little inside?
    Remark from Photo teacher to me: "If you're going to grow as an artist you have to put your work out there. If you do that it helps to have a thick skin." As for FB, the next time you're "there" look around. Your answer is evident.

    s-a
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  3. #3
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Being of a certain age, I often upload my photographs to Facebook and I'll admit, it's all about shameless validation. Today I uploaded an image (linked below) and a friend made an edit, uploaded and tagged me in it. I could see the humour in what he did, but the 'maker' got a little sensitive. He superimposed my face above the hedge in the picture, implying I'm a peeping Tom. I played along in the comments, but untagged myself as not to ruin my credibility as a 'serious artist'. Silly, I know, but I'm sure you can understand that I didn't want anyone else to see his edit after I'd uploaded the original.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YHR8s62g8s...gs/s1600/1.jpg

    I've been taking my photography very seriously for a while now, perhaps too seriously, as this Facebook thing suggests. I recall something photographer David Ward wrote about an incident with one of his images - an art buyer quipped upon seeing his photograph "oh look, a turd on the beach" (picture in question - http://bp3.blogger.com/_aXtCQUvQNns/...lbeg+beach.jpg)

    Has anybody else had nasty remarks or backhanded compliments about pictures you've presented? Particularly images you're proud of? Do you shrug it off or cry a little inside?
    Everybody cries a little on the inside. Everybody has an ego and everybody has feelings.

    But life's a journey.

    "acknowledge and move on dude..." " a sadder but wiser man".

    And if you see that asshole that done you wrong on a dark street one night, remember to fuck him up.

    In hockey we call that "taking a number". As you're laying in the corner and the guy that creamed you skates away, you get his number. It may take a few minutes, a few games, a few seasons or a few years but one of these days that son of a bitch is gonna pay.
    Last edited by blansky; 10-18-2012 at 01:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Has anybody else had nasty remarks about pictures you've presented? Particularly images you're proud of. Do you feel it might be an indication of how strong your image actually is?
    yes

    years ago i showed some of my work to aaron siskind at the request of a teacher i had ...
    he told me to throw away my camera and i was wasting my time.
    then he gave me a poster, wagged his finger at me told me never to make photographs like him, EVER

    its been 24 years. i never threw away my camera and i have made it a point never to copy him .... EVER.

    he was kind of a jerk ..

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    yes

    years ago i showed some of my work to aaron siskind at the request of a teacher i had ...
    he told me to throw away my camera and i was wasting my time.
    then he gave me a poster, wagged his finger at me told me never to make photographs like him, EVER

    its been 24 years. i never threw away my camera and i have made it a point never to copy him .... EVER.

    he was kind of a jerk ..
    Ouch! I believe Weston had a hard time when showing his prints to Stieglitz. Thank God he didn't drop the camera. If it's any consolation, I think Siskind is the poor man's Callahan.

  6. #6

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    When you upload any image to anywhere, copyrighted or not, it becomes a target for anyone to do anything they want and say anything they want - legal, ethical, beneficial, hurtful, or otherwise. You can challenge them, sue them, or ignore them, but you can't stop them from doing things to your image.

    With that in mind, I rarely post my images except the few I have here on APUG.

    As to your particular issue, all you can do is to express your displeasure to your friend.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    Everybody cries a little on the inside. Everybody has an ego and everybody has feelings.

    But life's a journey.

    "acknowledge and move on dude..." " a sadder but wiser man".

    And if you see that asshole that done you wrong on a dark street one night, remember to fuck him up.

    In hockey we call that "taking a number". As you're laying in the corner and the guy that creamed you skates away, you get his number. It may take a few minutes, a few games, a few seasons or a few years but one of these days that son of a bitch is gonna pay.
    Excellent.
    K.S. Klain

  8. #8

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    No, I have never had comment like that on Facebook. But then I only post personal and snapshots on Facebook for the most part.
    But what I have gotten and have been pretty annoyed by is gushing praise for a snapshot, you know, the kind everybody gets because no one can be honest anymore about if something is good or not.

    I would rather be critqued than constantly praised like most of Facebook and Flickr does.

  9. #9

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    About critics--- the minute someone pays me for an image my ears are all open to their criticism, until then closed.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  10. #10
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    I used to have similar experiences from my mother, who was a semi-professional photographer herself, where she would edit my pictures and suggest crops. She never meant harm, she just thought her vision of what my picture should be trumped my vision. I don't do FB or any of those other sites, just because often (but not always), the people most active are the people you should listen to the least.

    The question really is, did you like the picture? Does it convey what you want it to say? If the answer is not yes, then you have work to do. As soon as you stop caring what others think of your photos, you take the first big step to developing yourself as an artist. Asking for advice from the crowd gives you pictures that look like the crowd, which is exactly what the artist is not. I have no problem asking for technical advice or equipment advice but I will never ask for advice on artistic vision. If I need to ask others what I should say or convey, then I am no longer speaking and my pictures will reflect that.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

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