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View Poll Results: are you self taught or not?

Voters
104. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I am

    59 56.73%
  • No I have had formal training

    12 11.54%
  • Yes and no

    31 29.81%
  • I don't know what I am doing

    2 1.92%
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  1. #21
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Both. No one is totally self-taught, IMO. Follow a set of instructions -- someone else just showed you the way. Read a book -- someone else is teaching you. Look at someone else's print, then that person just taught you something.

    The self-taught and the self-made person is a pleasant myth.
    How true.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #22

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    The missing category in the poll is "informally trained".

    I had the benefit of a "non-formal" photographic tutor for a short while; a short period of professional experience; lots of amateur experience; a course or two in related imaging technology; and a lot more amateur experience. Hence: yes and no.

  3. #23
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Are you self taught or did you formal training?

    Nothing formal for me either. In college I studied more on the art and photo history side and got degrees in degrees in different subjects (anthropology & business). Learned a little bit of basic darkroom stuff from a friend, and the rest was from books, the web, and self experimentation.

    doh.. I miss clicked on the poll, you cant undo and revote can you? haha
    Last edited by Newt_on_Swings; 12-14-2012 at 06:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've done formal education (Maryland Institute College of Art Continuing Studies program), informal (Center for Alternative Processes, Project Basho, Smithsonian Resident Associates), and "self-taught" (pick up a book, follow the directions, get a result, lather, rinse, repeat).

  5. #25

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    Good Afternoon Again,

    In my first post in this thread, I neglected to mention that I've been with APUG almost since its beginning; that's added enormously to whatever photographic knowledge I can claim. Many thanks to those who have contributed!

    Konical

  6. #26
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Well I said "self taught" but yes, to me that equates to 'no formal training'. I shot a few rolls with folding Kodaks of models no longer remembered when I was maybe 8 or 9 in the late 1940s (gulp!), presumably with some parental advice. I was then awarded a Brownie Target Six-20* (to keep some distance between me and my parents 'good' cameras, I'll bet). I remember a Cub Scout activity when a bunch of us developed a roll of film -- see-sawing through containers under a red safelight -- must have been the original ortho Verichrome. The photography stuck better than the scouting, and by high school I was improvising a darkroom and doing some stuff at home.

    Observing details, and working with processes changing one variable at a time can be a significant learning experience.

    I've had perhaps a little more formal training in the painting side of things, although even that was mostly at the adult evening school sort of thing. (Grade school "art" classes were just enough they could claim they had some as I remember them.) Certainly comments about light and composition could equally apply to photography -- in the art side, as opposed to the technology. In the tech areas I pursued all sorts of mechanical and electrical stuff from the time I was a toddler, so some things seem to me to have just happened by magic, though perhaps someone like my dad may have tossed out some pointers along the way. By now I can claim about sixty years of experience -- even though I don't think it actually means much.

    * Still have it, still works -- a good investment on their part!

  7. #27
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Well I said "self taught" but yes, to me that equates to 'no formal training'.
    Same here. I am quite lucky in that if I see how someone does something, I can usually do it myself. This is why I do my own carpentry, building work, plumbing, central heating, electrical work, etc.

    Other things I have picked up at work without formal training include CAD drawing, using our CNC router and various other machines.

    I consider all of this to be self tuition even if it did involve asking other people questions.

    I don't have qualifications in any of it but I'm too close to retirement to worry about that now!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #28
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Well I said "self taught" but yes, to me that equates to 'no formal training'....
    Yes, I think that's pretty much what we all meant.

  9. #29
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    I had one high school class that included photography.

    Plus another two high school classes learning how to operate offset presses, including camera work in support.

    Plus two night school courses that were really just a way of getting time in a darkroom.

    Plus lots and lots and lots of informal education from my father, friends, co-workers, and Kodak publications.

    Plus APUG .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #30
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    I've always found it interesting that so many schools in the US (and others) have photography....that I think is a good thing. (talking schools not colleges and universities)

    OK... I think I might have phrased the title a bit better, self taught should mean as in "self taught" as in NO FORMAL TRAINING,NO TEACHERS,CLASSROOMS CURRICULUMS/MODULES/WHATEVER THE TERMS IS. I am interested in how the work (and whole philosophy around photography) and what the ratio of the active members(those that responded anyway) of this forum differs from NON FORMALLY and FORMALLY trained, the "yes and no" option would include, workshops and other similar training.

    As someone that not been formally trained, I sometimes I have to wonder how and what "influence" a Teacher/lecturer has/might not have on a person's photographic work... and the whole being part of a group of students....does this have an effect. I understand that if you read a book, the author is "teaching" you in some way, but just because I have read a book by say Ansel Adams or Andreas Feininger does not mean I have nearly been "tought" by them, books unlike face to face teaching/training, must impart some very different ways of approaching one's photography, IDK....

    I am not saying one makes you better than the other, just trying to figure out the difference reflected in peoples work/philosophy, if any....
    Last edited by Ricus.stormfire; 12-14-2012 at 04:55 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: some clarification added

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