Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,522   Posts: 1,543,801   Online: 762
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka View Post
    It really depends on what type of artistic person you are. You can create your best work in your youth, or you can create your best work within a few years of your death. David Galenson did a lot of research on this topic, albeit in the world of painting, (later he investigated music and poetry). He plotted painter's ages and when they did their best work. He determined "best" work based on auction prices and how many times a particular painting was shown in art history text books. The two ends of his spectrum were "conceptualists," artists that peaked early and "experimentalists," artists that peaked later in life. Google is your friend if you want to learn more about this concept.
    Yes, this is mentioned in the original blog entry - old masters and young geniuses. Photography and painting aren't the same discipline - one is an art medium, one is many other things as well as an art medium.

    Wait a minute... SIGH. Here we go, things have become confused. His study is on 'painters as artists'. I understand painting is used for many other purposes other than frescoes and a painter and decorator, arguably, may only have one success in one small bathroom in a terraced house. This question is about 'photographers as artists' and their successes. We need a new study.

    I don't think anything can be drawn from studies which omit photography as an art medium. This question is specifically about... published art photographers... let's just use the word influential. Art photographers who have published or exhibited bodies of work which have influenced photography as an expressive medium, internationally.
    Last edited by batwister; 02-18-2013 at 03:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    coigach's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Inverness-shire, Scotland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,485
    Images
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I'm in my seventies and still waiting.

  3. #13
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,994
    Images
    6
    I'm 50 and I'm still waiting . I technically competent since my 20s but had nothing to say. As I grow older, I'm less likely to reject photos I hated when I was younger. Always do your best work you can at any age.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #14
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    811
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Recently started reading Alec Soth's Little Brown Mushroom blog and this question is something I've thought about quite a bit recently.
    Based on reading his thoughts over the years and a brief chance to speak with him after an Atlanta event, Soth strikes me as a bit of a Gloomy Gus.

    Strand was amazing at the beginning, middle and end. Very few people maintain that high level of excellence, although Strand took about ten years off to work as a film maker, during which time he did very little still photography. Szarkowski said that Ansel Adams had about a 20 year peak before he began to fall into repetition.

    Emmet Gowin (whom I met last week ) did great work at a young age and has been consistently very good. He's now 72 or so, still making great photographs and obviously very passionate about it. (His wife is lovely and looks nothing like the classic images would suggest.)

    Sugimoto and Izu are doing amazing work in their 50s and 60s. Keith Carter, too. Carter didn't actually become known until about 40. Frederick Sommer was great right until the end.

    Don't forget Avedon's "In the American West" which he started at age 56 and completed around age 62. Robert Adams didn't even pick up a camera until his 30s, and he's still going strong past 70.

    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Thinking of my own demographic, Stephen Shore produced a lot of his work for Uncommon Places at 26. Lewis Baltz started his Prototype Works at 24. The funny one Soth mentions is Lartigue, who hit his peak at 11.
    I would argue that Shore pretty much peaked creatively around that time. Baltz is not one of the more memorable photographers in the history of the medium.

    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Personally, I think the lack of stamina that comes with age has little to do with it - particularly thinking of Paul Strand, whose later work, for me, is his best. Not mentioned much on the blog, but how productive we are at any given age surely has a great deal to do with external influences - the people you come into contact with, how inspired you are by your environment, MONEY! Living a life of uninhibited experience might be the most important factor in producing great creative work. Four walls in a one horse town don't stay inspiring for long.
    Physical stamina is one thing. Mental stamina is quite another. You can get someone to carry your camera for you (like Izu, his 14x20 camera plus all the trimmings weighs 300 pounds) but it's hard to have someone see for you, although Richard Prince has that figured out! I think it takes a very strong mind and incredible willpower to work at the highest levels of photography. At what age you find that is probably irrelevant.

    At 44, I personally refuse to believe that my peak years are behind me. Maybe someone needs to slap me. So much of what you see out there in PDN or American Photo tends to focus on the youth of photography, but most of it is uniformly uninspiring 35mm digital crap. It all looks the same.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  5. #15
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,236
    Images
    65
    I hope it's in the seventies and eighties, else, alas, it's passed me by!

  6. #16
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,276
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian C. Miller View Post
    The most productive period is before a person dies. After death, people don't do so much.

    "I'll be mellow when I'm dead,
    I'll be mellow when I'm dead,
    I'll be mellooooowwww....
    When I'm dead!"
    -- Weird Al Yankovic
    I was going to say an artist produces their best work in their elder years. Unfounded opinion, I was just going to say.

    I like seeing Weird Al quotes, I have lots of stories I can tell... from the time when I went under the alias Beefalo Bill

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    Based on reading his thoughts over the years and a brief chance to speak with him after an Atlanta event, Soth strikes me as a bit of a Gloomy Gus.
    I can only suspect that working at his level, in that world and specifically, having to interact with Martin Parr , you need to at least have a facade of cynicism to survive. Not met him, but he certainly strikes me as very conflicted about that in lectures and interviews.

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    I would argue that Shore pretty much peaked creatively around that time. Baltz is not one of the more memorable photographers in the history of the medium.
    Definitely agree about Shore. I only mention Lewis Baltz because of his fully developed visual sense and critical facility at such a young age.

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    Physical stamina is one thing. Mental stamina is quite another. You can get someone to carry your camera for you (like Izu, his 14x20 camera plus all the trimmings weighs 300 pounds) but it's hard to have someone see for you, although Richard Prince has that figured out! I think it takes a very strong mind and incredible willpower to work at the highest levels of photography. At what age you find that is probably irrelevant.
    Absolutely. By stamina I meant, quite generally, maintaining the will to get up and do it consistently. But the will to do anything is determined by your environment and people that surround you. They say the creative urge is dormant within us all, but maybe for most of us actively engaged in some form of artistic endeavor, we just about get by with the odd creative refuel, through chance encounters with the right people and places.
    Last edited by batwister; 02-18-2013 at 05:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #18
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,647
    Images
    40
    I was reading a while back that there are two types of genuises (and I suppose artists). Those who at a relatively young age come up with breath-taking ideas, concepts or art, but then never quite reach the same peak of creativity again. Then there are the late-bloomers who consistently put in the time and effort and reach a peak way into their later years. The rarest kind would be those who peak early and stay there.

    Perhaps it was the same writer that Joe refers to above.

    Dang -- I did not realize there was a second page of posts. Some great comments! I like to think that I am just getting started -- or restarted after slowing down a bit raising three boys. It is nice having three 16-year-olds to help haul an 8x10 or an 11x14 camera around...and to use as models.
    Last edited by Vaughn; 02-18-2013 at 06:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,285
    Blog Entries
    4
    Images
    49
    it makes me wonder if the folks who "peaked" at a young age
    were still photographing and making photographs their entire life
    or if they got busy with other thing and tapered off ... and the people
    who "peaked" later in life, if they started late, or just continued photographing every chance
    they got until the very end.

    photography like anything else is a something that requires
    practice. people often times get good at what they do, sometimes they venture out
    and do something "new" and their comfortability with a camera ( or darkroom, or stylistically )
    bleeds into everything they do, and others well, they just take a photograph from time to time while they try to do other things
    to makes a living. a lot of people who are commercial photographers, assignment photographers, portrait photographers
    their "art" becomes their work, or the other way around, but they do it day in and day out ... and they get great at what they do ...
    do they peak early or late or they just plateau ?

  10. #20
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    260
    Images
    35
    It is different for everyone. To make a blanket statement would make no sense. I am in my early 40's and although I don't have the energy I had 20 years ago, my mind is in a much better place now. I find it easy to look to the future. To think that anyone really cares whether I have peaked or not is a different story.....
    Last edited by Patrick Robert James; 02-19-2013 at 03:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin