Switch to English Language Passer en langue franÁaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,771   Posts: 1,484,290   Online: 1147
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24
  1. #21
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,051
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    424
    Fabrizio- the Steve McCurry "Afghan Girl" was far more relevant to the story being told than this photo. With her, you could see the grit on her face and the stress and worry. That photo "said" something about Afghanistan. This photo doesn't say anything about the story it purports to represent. The individual happens to own a gun, and lives in Rochester. But he is not representative of living in "The Crescent", nor does he have anything to do with gun violence or drug traffic. The accuracy of his former MOS aside, I think part of the problem with calling him a "sniper" while in civilian attire implies that somehow he has not made the transition from military to civilian life, and is perhaps a survivalist or otherwise a "paranoid gun nut", things that are unsubstantiated by the image (note I said unsubstantiated, not proven or disproven). It comes across as someone who is NOT an American taking photos (and captioning them) with an agenda to portray the country as populated by armed fanatics living in a post-apocalyptic bunker mentality world. And while I will not deny there are people here who do think that way, they are far from the norm.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    912
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Fabrizio- the Steve McCurry "Afghan Girl" was far more relevant to the story being told than this photo. With her, you could see the grit on her face and the stress and worry. That photo "said" something about Afghanistan.
    Really? What you see as stress and worry, I see as unhinged - almost like she's playing up to the camera - "do your scary eyes!". But I'd say Afghan Girl, like the Mona Lisa, is notable for its ambiguity. An image that can be easily read won't be remembered.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  3. #23
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    A portrait must convey some nuances. Be it the "stress" of her face (one should wonder if really the "stress" is due to what the westerner would think it is due or to a casual occurrence of the moment, such as a headache or somebody shouting out of the door etc.), a rifle on the foot, a hat with a panache, some cigarette smoke etc. There's something true and something "created" in all portraits. A portrait is the art of conveying something which is not explicitly stated.

    Yes the hidden message probably was: this town has become dangerous, people have rifles in their houses, criminality is high, life was better once.

    How do you "convey" this set of ideas to an European audience? With an image which somehow tries to convey this message. An image that's potentially worth one thousand words, without those words be explicited in the image.
    Pellegrin chose a "grim" high-contrast portrait of a man in a garage with his rifle. Subconsciously that might raise thoughts of "urban warfare", anarchic chaos. Rationally, it's a man with a rifle in a garage. Night atmosphera and lateral light might add to the "message". They are not false or right in their own principle. It's an image created to portray an idea.

    When Karsh portrayed Churchill in lateral light and high contrast, with his serious expression, he certainly meant something like that, giving an idea of the damnation of power, so to speak. I'm sure Churchill might have been portrayed in the shade of a tree, sitting on the grass, with a white dress while sipping a glass of wine and smiling but that wouldn't have worked the same.

    Some people is making polemics about which was Churchill's exact job description before being Prime Minister of an empire engaged in a bloody war. That's not the point. The point is that the portrait tries to convey an atmosphere, something that words don't express but the soul hopefully catches. The photographer tries to create those images that work more than words in expressing a situation. That sometimes involves "creating" the image not "capturing" it.

    And I don't think at all that this portrait equals in power Karsh's portrait of Churchill.

    Also I think that to an American audience somebody in a garage with a rifle is much more natural than to an European audience. An American would probably not get the "exceptionality" of the civilian in civilian dress with an assault rifle (or whatever it is) at his foot.

    Now, you'd say: well that's America so it's not Rochester. Such a portrait might have been done anywhere in the US, even the most tranquil spot.
    I agree, rationally.
    But the image to the intended audience "speaks" about a degraded economy, a compromised security in the city. It's created and it's a way to tell one story in one image, that's all.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,093
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Also I think that to an American audience somebody in a garage with a rifle is much more natural than to an European audience. An American would probably not get the "exceptionality" of the civilian in civilian dress with an assault rifle (or whatever it is) at his foot.
    This is probably an important point. I'd also point out that to an American audience that's only sort of "civilian" dress; the t-shirt fairly obviously marks him as either a Marine or (less likely) a militia-type paramilitary-wannabe. The ammo belt over his shoulder also reads strongly as military. My first thought was that he had the Special Forces look, and I don't think that registers with a European audience---which happens to be where the story was first published, though I don't know if Pellegrin knew he was shooting for European publication at the time and this particular photo didn't run there.

    But the image to the intended audience "speaks" about a degraded economy, a compromised security in the city. It's created and it's a way to tell one story in one image, that's all.
    I can't really tell what Pellegrin's original plans for the photo were from the coverage, so it's hard to stake out a position on how much he was obliged to be doing "hard" journalism and how much artistic license was appropriate.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  ó   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin