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  1. #11

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    hi tkamiya

    i couldn't agree more with what you said.
    it might be good photo kharma ...

    i love using box cameras for similar reasons
    ask me how ..

  2. #12
    hdeyong's Avatar
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    Having switched back from fully auto-everything d'''''l to manually metered and focussed film cameras, I'm shooting a lot less and keeping a lot more.
    I think the harder you have to work at something and involve yourself in it, the better job you'll do.

  3. #13
    Griz's Avatar
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    I had the same experience shooting a covered bridge landscape using my ME Super and a Isolette II. Much better prints from the 6x6...

    Griz
    Get out and shoot!!!

  4. #14
    NedL's Avatar
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    Agree with everyone else here, except that I do tend to be very deliberate with 35mm and even with the unmentionable medium. It takes me a long time to get through 36 frames! One thing that's nice for me about those 6x9 folders is that I don't have to wait so long and get through 8 sooner. I have several old cameras and pinhole cameras that I use as 1-shots.... place a piece of film over the gate, take it out, make one picture, then home to develop. Not only does that focus the mind, but it's a lot of fun!

  5. #15
    blansky's Avatar
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    People usually drive slower on their day off also.

    Could it be that when using older simpler equipment you are in a more relaxed frame of mind that if and when you are shooting for a living and working?

    The fact probably is that when people are working with their cameras, they probably don't use older simpler gear.

    Just asking?
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #16
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    As I look back, I took my time in framing, metering, and basically contemplating more with my tourist where as I was snap happy with F100. It's quite annoying that technology (that I paid for!) actually became a hindrance with me using F100 and quite refreshing that simple camera from more than half a decade ago can still hold its own when I used it properly.
    That would be a half century, right?

    Medium format has a great balance between portability/ease of movement and the slower, contemplative pace you get with larger cameras. I find that my large format work is just too static for my tastes, and my 35mm work looks like it was shot by Bill the Cat. ACK!!
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  7. #17

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    Reading this thread reminded me of this:http://www.photographersgallery.com/photo.asp?id=622
    Steve.

  8. #18
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I think the deeper truth is that many modern cameras have features that make 'getting the shot' more convenient and accessible - if you know what to do with the tools. The added functionality and capability adds nothing if you can't use it to its full potential.

    A trained eye can make just as important a photograph in a split second, as somebody working deliberately with an 8x10 sheet film camera.

    The most important picture I ever took was of my grandmother, with a simple Pentax KX and a 35mm lens, hand held in dim lighting. Incidentally, with respect to this conversation, she passed away today, and it made me realize just how important that picture is to me and all those that love her. Who cares what tools I used... The best camera and the best tool is the one you have with you and the one you know well and can react instinctively with. The rest simply is not important.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mormor.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I think the deeper truth is that many modern cameras have features that make 'getting the shot' more convenient and accessible - if you know what to do with the tools. The added functionality and capability adds nothing if you can't use it to its full potential.

    A trained eye can make just as important a photograph in a split second, as somebody working deliberately with an 8x10 sheet film camera.

    The most important picture I ever took was of my grandmother, with a simple Pentax KX and a 35mm lens, hand held in dim lighting. Incidentally, with respect to this conversation, she passed away today, and it made me realize just how important that picture is to me and all those that love her. Who cares what tools I used... The best camera and the best tool is the one you have with you and the one you know well and can react instinctively with. The rest simply is not important.
    Tom, that's an amazing image in and of itself. Thank you for sharing it, and sorry to hear of her passing.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  10. #20
    winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I think the deeper truth is that many modern cameras have features that make 'getting the shot' more convenient and accessible - if you know what to do with the tools. The added functionality and capability adds nothing if you can't use it to its full potential.

    A trained eye can make just as important a photograph in a split second, as somebody working deliberately with an 8x10 sheet film camera.

    The most important picture I ever took was of my grandmother, with a simple Pentax KX and a 35mm lens, hand held in dim lighting. Incidentally, with respect to this conversation, she passed away today, and it made me realize just how important that picture is to me and all those that love her. Who cares what tools I used... The best camera and the best tool is the one you have with you and the one you know well and can react instinctively with. The rest simply is not important.
    Thomas, I'm so sorry to hear that and I'm glad you also have a photo of her that you love.




    I have my spray and pray moments with d--l, but have also been known to be slow and deliberate with even it. It just can be tough to get the brain to engage sometimes.

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