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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I think the deeper truth is that many modern cameras have features that make 'getting the shot' more convenient and accessible - if you know what to do with the tools. The added functionality and capability adds nothing if you can't use it to its full potential.

    A trained eye can make just as important a photograph in a split second, as somebody working deliberately with an 8x10 sheet film camera.

    The most important picture I ever took was of my grandmother, with a simple Pentax KX and a 35mm lens, hand held in dim lighting. Incidentally, with respect to this conversation, she passed away today, and it made me realize just how important that picture is to me and all those that love her. Who cares what tools I used... The best camera and the best tool is the one you have with you and the one you know well and can react instinctively with. The rest simply is not important.
    Beautiful work Thomas.

    I am sorry to hear of her passing.

    John

  2. #22
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    Sorry to learn of your Grandmothers demise Thomas. The picture is a wonderful shot which I'm sure you will always treasure.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #23
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    My condolences Thomas.

    My rule of thumb is that if I have to work hard to remember how to use a function on a camera, that function is an afterthought, and is just as likely to impede good photographs as it is to enable them.

    This is at least partially due to the fact that I have too many cameras.

    It also means that some camera designs are way more successful then others. As an example, I refer to something like a self timer. I use my self timers regularly (in lieu of a cable release). By far and away the best design is on my Olympus OM 20. In contrast, on my various Canon EOS bodies, it is always a head scratching moment to try to find the setting, much less figure it out.

    And don't get me started on "menus"!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by h.v. View Post
    Funny, they say the same thing about digital vs 35mm. Personally, I find the 24 or 36 exposure 35mm roll to be the best for my work. 12 shots on 6x6 is too little often, especially when you consider how much more annoying it is to reload. But that's just me.
    I also thought about the digital/film difference.
    In theory one can be as careful and deliberate in composition and choice of subjects with film as with digital.
    In practice, a devil in the back of most minds forces the photographer to be more sloppy with digital.
    That happens to me, partly due to the worse finding system of the digital, and partly due to the abovementioned devil.

    Something happens in the background of the mind when one uses film (vs. digital) or large format (vs. small format). More thinking, more selection, and probably even more attention, all of that more or less unconsciously I think.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  5. #25

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    I'm a lot worse when I have a digital body in my hands. It's not unusual for me to come back with several hundred exposures. With 35mm, couple of rolls aren't all that unusual. I tend to spend up to what I brought with me if I find the subject interesting. I have some where I compose carefully and shoot. Then I tend to take several permutations which tend to waste a lot of frames. Some are experimental so there are some value in that.

    When I had 8 frame limit on my Kodak, that was it, so I examined each scene carefully. Did I miss anything? I guess it's depends on a point of view. It would be impossible to take some of the shots I took with my other gear but I did make some interesting composition (if I may say so myself) because of the limitation I had.

    Thinking back and considering many of my "photo trips", what's kind of interesting to me is, my "keeper per trip" rate doesn't seem to change all that much despite number of the shots I take....

    What troubles me about this equipment thing is, I tend to take stuff to cover all the 'what-if' situations. That means I'm carrying from ultra wide to tele and a flash. (they are often zooms) It makes me think, is it really necessary? Maybe one ultra wide and one normal? I haven't narrowed this down, yet.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #26
    NedL's Avatar
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    I'm so slow at printing that if I used film any faster than I do, I'd never manage to print them. Also fewer would be worth printing at all, I'm sure ( Presuming of course that some are now! )

  7. #27
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    I made a "camera" from a film can, aluminum foil and ortho litho film. Worked out amazingly well. 2 day exposure, contact print onto some old somewhat fogged Kodak polycontrast paper. I'm stunned how relatively rectilinear the image is despite the 180 degree curve of the film plane. My "darkroom" aka the basement. My wife asks "WHAT do YOU do THERE?"

  8. #28

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    Holy cow!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    The best images came out of the Tourist.
    Not trying to disagree with "it's the photographer, not the equipment", but curiosity's got the better of me: what lens was on the Tourist?

  10. #30

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    Hi, Moose...

    The lens is Kodak Anaston f/6.3 105mm which I understand the second best kind for this camera. It's really in good shape though. I also understand, Kodak Tourist was a top-of-the-line camera of its kind for the period.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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