Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,009   Posts: 1,524,612   Online: 1040
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917

    Best image came out of a simplest camera

    This is quite annoying and refreshing at the same time....

    A while back, I went to a landscape shoot with a friend of mine. I took my Nikon F100 with a zoom lens and shot 6 rolls. As you know, Nikon F100 is one of the later incarnation of Nikon 35mm line and it's quite an advanced camera. Everything is automated with an ability for me to override as I see fit. Along with it, medium zoom gave me all the focal range that I wanted. Along with it, I took a Kodak Tourist, a fixed lens medium format folder (6x9) from 1950s. EVERYTHING is manual on this camera. No auto-anything! I didn't even finish a roll, so there were exactly 6 exposures made. I just finished processing all the rolls.

    The best images came out of the Tourist.

    As I look back, I took my time in framing, metering, and basically contemplating more with my tourist where as I was snap happy with F100. It's quite annoying that technology (that I paid for!) actually became a hindrance with me using F100 and quite refreshing that simple camera from more than half a decade ago can still hold its own when I used it properly.

    Anyone have a similar experience you'd like to share?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2
    David Nardi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    87

    Best image came out of a simplest camera

    This is why I took up 4x5 and 8x10 photography. Seems the bigger the format I go and the more limitations I have, the stronger the resulting images. Everything becomes more deliberate and considered. It's true what they say, "Limitation breeds creativity".
    David S. Nardi Photography
    'preserving the beauty in nature'
    www.davidnardi.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ogden, Utah USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    961
    35mm cameras with all those bells and whistles make you lazy -- you can shoot half a dozen and pick the best later. an 8-shot roll makes you stop and think.

    our photo editor at the newspaper really hates that new photos with no film training will take their pro digi cameras, spray off a couple dozen or hundred random pictures in high-res raw and then come back and try to crop something good out of that mess.

    "Give them a speed graphic and half a dozen film holders to shoot an entire assignment" I tell him, and some days he wishes he could, except many of these kids have never shot film. ever.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    457
    Images
    14
    While I generally agree that the cost and limitations of larger film sizes make the process more deliberate, there is no excuse for not applying the same good habits and diligence when shooting smaller formats with more automatic or "electronic imaging" cameras. I have equally pleasing results on 35 mm and MF, to the effect that I print equal quantities from both. It is a mindset, nothing more.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    35mm cameras with all those bells and whistles make you lazy -- you can shoot half a dozen and pick the best later. an 8-shot roll makes you stop and think.

    our photo editor at the newspaper really hates that new photos with no film training will take their pro digi cameras, spray off a couple dozen or hundred random pictures in high-res raw and then come back and try to crop something good out of that mess.

    "Give them a speed graphic and half a dozen film holders to shoot an entire assignment" I tell him, and some days he wishes he could, except many of these kids have never shot film. ever.
    Funny, they say the same thing about digital vs 35mm. Personally, I find the 24 or 36 exposure 35mm roll to be the best for my work. 12 shots on 6x6 is too little often, especially when you consider how much more annoying it is to reload. But that's just me.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Borås, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    14
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    It is a mindset, nothing more.
    I agree. It's not in the equipment, it's in the Photographer.

    Just because some equipment makes it faster, easier or cheaper to pay and spray, doesn't mean you are forced to. You can use an approach that is just as slow and thought-through with fully automatic 35mm cameras or even digital as you do with even large format.

    I don't shoot more on the rare occations when I shoot digital than when I shoot with my very simple fully manual Soviet cameras such as my Lomo Smena or my Moskva 5.

    That being said, there are occations when a faster flow, and even some amount of pay and spray bursts can be useful, such as sports when timing is important etc, and there are occations when equipment that slows you down can help you restrain yourself, such as when excitement kicks in and adrenalin rushes, but mostly, the process before the trigger is pressed is not in the equipment but in the mind of the photographer.

  7. #7
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,515
    Images
    15
    The revelation is a bit like a near miss with a car, isnt it? Shocking and surprising. It gives pause to reflect.

    You do not need a highly automated, bells and whistles, wings-n-things camera for beautiful photography.
    It can all be done with a pinhole camera. Or a Kodak Tourist. Or a Speed Graphic. Add to the list.
    That automation is taking away from you what you should be doing, what you should be thinking about (which you did with the Tourist).

    You're not alone. My best images now don't come from an EOS1N now, but a Pentax 67 and a pinhole camera, both of which I meter manually.
    Importantly, it's how much you know about creating the image you want — visualising it and working toward it. It's not all the camera's fault.
    These advanced cameras (so, what are people buying $8,000 digitals for!?) are overkill for anything other than high speed sports, aerial, surveillance or studio/modelling work where speed, automation, reliability and refinement are requisites. I don't see how they are suitable for landscape work compared to bigger, better formats that require a more conscious, worked approach toward creating the image e.g. medium format, large format, ultra-large format...
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,515
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by h.v. View Post
    Funny, they say the same thing about digital vs 35mm. Personally, I find the 24 or 36 exposure 35mm roll to be the best for my work. 12 shots on 6x6 is too little often, especially when you consider how much more annoying it is to reload. But that's just me.


    Remember how big those other formats are out there. For example, 6x7 is a full 400% bigger than 35mm, 6x6 not far behind it.
    Yes, I know how good the bigger format (manually metered) prints look alongside the 35mm bespoke Ilfochromes out of a high end SLR.

    Yes, 120 film loading is a rip-roaring fumblefest, fraught with swear words way too naughty to print here (I'm no prude, sweets, and I can let anything and everything within earshot "have it"!). Yep, 10 to 12 images at most, maybe even a blank from tripping the shutter when you shouldn't have. And if you know what you're doing, those 10-12 pics be the best images you ever created.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    617
    Certainly. My exposures got better when I stopped relying on a meter. I still use one from time to time, but most of my shots have guessed exposure now. Always seems to be better than when I just shot in aperture priority mode.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,917
    Quote Originally Posted by mannbro View Post
    I agree. It's not in the equipment, it's in the Photographer.

    Of course it's the photographer. Camera is just a box with a hole on it. (oh, ya, film, too....) But in reality, some people, like myself, need to be forced to THINK. Equipment can certainly help. I/we are so used to having so much of the "stuff" done automatically for us.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin