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  1. #51

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    NT: No argument there. I'm certainly not suggesting people should simply give up things they aren't great at. Rather that they should be realistic about what they are trying to achieve or accomplish. I wouldn't have said any of this had the original post not been so searching. But batwister's posts on this subject (this isn't the first thread of this type he's posted) seemed almost like the angst of someone wishing to get into a great artist's head in an attempt to figure out how to be really good at something he wants to do. His goals appear substantially more serious than someone just wanting to enjoy an artistic pastime to the best of his ability.

    On the other hand I may have just misinterpreted the whole thing. Batwister's most recent post above does change things a little. I have wrestled with similar issues, and still do. Much of it in my own case has to do with setting impossibly high standards. This angle was not clear to me in the original post so apologies if I took things in the wrong direction.

    As far as music goes, I still don't think it is much different. Perhaps it is because my background is in orchestral/"classical" music. Anyway that's a discussion for a different thread.

  2. #52

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    My suggestion to OP is that not to think too much about this. As I mentioned in my first reply, this isn't something you can force yourself to do, until something strikes you. You may see a pattern in the work you do. You may find a cause you feel passionate about. It'll come to you.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #53
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    At last year's Atlanta Celebrates Photography portfolio review, I had a chance to show my work to Chip Simone, who studied with Harry Callahan. He said Harry always told him "to work on the pile." Meaning, don't think too much, just work like a dog, pile up prints and then sort it out later.

    We all have these periods where we question our ability to make a meaningful contribution to the magnificent medium of photography. Going too far down that road leads to paralysis. Looking back over the past 22 years, I frankly wish I had thought less about art and had just made more snapshots of my family and friends.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  4. #54

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    batwister

    fame is not the same as success ...

    not sure which it is that you are looking for.
    success requires working hard, fame requires connections

  5. #55
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Here's something relating to Rick A's post.

    http://www.creativecreativity.com/20...ble-artis.html
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  6. #56

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    Seriously, you write with intelligence, you struggle with your own concepts of high standards, you search for visual meaning, and you apparently desire advancing the medium, or at least equating what has been done by others according to your belief system. So, I'd go make 10,000 bad photographs.

    Edit:
    Btw; Post them here and we'll tell you if they suck.
    W.A. Crider

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    When you watch the American Idol top ten, you can already pick out the top three, because everyone else looks like a chump by comparison. Sad, but true.
    Yes, but isn't that because pop stars are judged for 'the whole package'? If it was a straight singing competition, the final decision would be much more difficult. We judge everyone in the performing arts today, firstly, on their personality, like dates - because we might have to get used to seeing them a lot! It's not quite like that in photography.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #58

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    Agree, American Idol is not a good example. That's a pop star competition, which has relatively little to do with singing in the end. Intonation, for example, is lousy in virtually every case.

  9. #59

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    Is there a photographic equivalent to an affected delayed vibrato? As soon as I hear that, "I'm out." Oh... that's Dragon's Den.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  10. #60

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    Unfortunately the current preferred pop singing "style" (which has been around far too long), derivative of gospel and older R&B, is the use of incessant, shrieking, aimless embelishments to mask the inability to hold a note in tune.

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