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  1. #181
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I don't think you can say Adams and Maier were devoid of education/exposure to formal notions about art, Adams moreso than Maier. Maier had talent, and her work deserves recognition. But she didn't produce a game-changing body of work - she was photographing within a well-established genre, and frankly, never sought the publicity she is now receiving. Adams, however, did produce a genre-defining style of work, and if you read his bio on the Wikipedia page, he was in constant contact with other artists who were both his contemporaries and his seniors, through whom he would no doubt have gotten exposure to art history. I think you can certainly say they (Adams and Maier) did not have formal academic instruction in art history, but to claim that they were unaware of it would be erroneous. Grandma Moses was an outlier, a one-off, and her commercial success is not a good argument - she produced work at really the end of a very long movement of American folk art, very much steeped in a tradition. So if anything, you could say she was the MOST indebted to art history of the three examples, although it would be a very specific, narrow art history.

    If you want to find examples of artists who broke the mold without having first seen what the mold could provide, these three are not good examples.

  2. #182
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Egan View Post
    There, Their, They're! Take your pick I suppose? The trouble with the world today is there are too few pedants.
    My thoughts exactly!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #183
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pfiltz View Post
    Hey folks.

    Is there a place in Chicago to view real prints made in a darkroom?
    Art Institute, lower level.

  4. #184
    Pfiltz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchetman View Post
    Art Institute, lower level.
    Thanks... I plan on going up one day early, just to view prints at these places.
    Go to the light......

    www.keepsakephotography.us

  5. #185
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I don't think you can say Adams and Maier were devoid of education/exposure to formal notions about art, Adams moreso than Maier. Maier had talent, and her work deserves recognition. But she didn't produce a game-changing body of work - she was photographing within a well-established genre, and frankly, never sought the publicity she is now receiving. Adams, however, did produce a genre-defining style of work, and if you read his bio on the Wikipedia page, he was in constant contact with other artists who were both his contemporaries and his seniors, through whom he would no doubt have gotten exposure to art history. I think you can certainly say they (Adams and Maier) did not have formal academic instruction in art history, but to claim that they were unaware of it would be erroneous. Grandma Moses was an outlier, a one-off, and her commercial success is not a good argument - she produced work at really the end of a very long movement of American folk art, very much steeped in a tradition. So if anything, you could say she was the MOST indebted to art history of the three examples, although it would be a very specific, narrow art history.

    If you want to find examples of artists who broke the mold without having first seen what the mold could provide, these three are not good examples.
    As has been said several times above, we don't live in a vacuum, surely some exposure came early for Adams and I do agree that Adams got an education in photographic history but it also seems apparent that his inspiration came before his formal education or serious study of photography.

    Galen Rowell and Joe Buissink I think are very reasonable examples of commercially successful photographers who like Adams turned a hobby into a successful vocation.

    I believe that Rowell, Buissink, and Adams each have a couple very important things besides photography in common though. They are/were commercially astute to begin with and they each had/have passions/inspirations they wanted to share with the world.

    These guys didn't start out to be visual artists. Adams was studying to be a pianist, Rowell was in the automotive business, Buissink was studying for a Phd in psychology.

    Their artistic inspiration was driven by wanting to express/share their moments/experiences/emotions with others. Yosemite for Adams, climbing for Rowell, and emotions for Buissink. Photography in a sense for these guys was simply a convenient tool.

    The important questions after the inspiration are present tense, like "what tools and skills do I need?" and "who is my competition?" not past tense, like "what would Stieglitz have done?".
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #186

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Adams, however, did produce a genre-defining style of work, and if you read his bio on the Wikipedia page, he was in constant contact with other artists who were both his contemporaries and his seniors, through whom he would no doubt have gotten exposure to art history.
    are you suggesting he invented a genre that didn't exist before him?
    if you are suggesting this, i find this hard to believe
    because he was just continuing the same sort of photography
    timothy o sullivan did a few years before him, almost photographing the same things
    and who knows maybe even the same tripod holes, like all the lovers of his work do with his tripod holes ...


    i guess the OP will return in 3 years ...

  7. #187
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    because he was just continuing the same sort of photography
    timothy o sullivan did a few years before him, almost photographing the same things
    and who knows maybe even the same tripod holes, like all the lovers of his work do with his tripod holes ...
    Haters?

    Just askin', John...

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #188

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Haters?

    Just askin', John...

    Ken
    naaah i don't hate anything ... or anyone
    life's too short to waste energy on something
    as pointless as that ...
    but i do miss walking by
    hand the hatters place in boston !
    http://www.csmonitor.com/1988/1011/rhat.html

  9. #189

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    This does not answer the question of whether the tradition has been lost but fine art photography is attracting more buyers:
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathrynt...t-photography/
    It's a financial risk to support new artists as ever. IMO in the UK Rankin is worth watching,some of his work is traditional, some not.

  10. #190

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    are you suggesting he invented a genre that didn't exist before him?
    if you are suggesting this, i find this hard to believe
    because he was just continuing the same sort of photography
    timothy o sullivan did a few years before him, almost photographing the same things
    and who knows maybe even the same tripod holes, like all the lovers of his work do with his tripod holes ...
    We're wandering off topic a bit, but I guess it depends on what you consider a "genre" to be. You'd never mistake O'Sullivan's photos for f/64 work; apart from technical differences, they don't really have that central "ain't nature grand" vibe that sort of defines Adams. The influence is obvious, but personally I wouldn't say "same genre", except in the very broad sense in which "landscapes in the American West" is a genre.

    i guess the OP will return in 3 years ...
    That line of discussion was getting interesting, I thought, and I hope he didn't leave in a huff.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_



 

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