Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,687   Posts: 1,548,642   Online: 1212
      
Page 23 of 28 FirstFirst ... 13171819202122232425262728 LastLast
Results 221 to 230 of 278
  1. #221
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,925
    I would also add Mark Klett and his work on the New Topographics and rephotographic surveys as very influential right now.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  2. #222
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,363
    Images
    225

    Loss of fine art photography tradition

    Annie Levowitz, Gregory Crewdson, Steve McCurry - for people

    YOU GUYS for landscapes


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #223

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,333
    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    Wow....that is like saying history classes should be dropped from all school curriculum, entirely ignorant sir.
    Might as well. The ones governing our countries don't seem to care anyway so why should we?
    I dont think history in all and the history of photography relate or has much in common in relation to this subject. The way things evolve in this era with all this new technology etc I see little reason to demand that young photogs know about the master of the last century. It might be helpfull enlightening and even interesting for them to know but as it is their heroes might as well be those of today teaching them, inspiring them and talking their language

    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
    Except Ansel, I had no idea who any of those old masters were when I was in my teens and early 20's. But as I grew up, got more work and got better, I sought out the info for my self. David Hobby and McNally are not in any way shape or form at the level of mastery of who are truly considered masters by the way, they are mostly marketing sell-outs and will never have the historical impact of the aforementioned. They also won't have a nice print sale like Nick Brandt's 60x80 African elephant at 215K. There is a big difference between a fine art photographer and two guys who now make most of their incomes off of teaching gear laden workshops my friend....
    Maybe not but inspiration to make great art doesn't have to come from former great photography artist it may come from all directions even the trashcan so why not from modern fashion or glamour, other not so good photographers giving you a good idea or even cartoons. I find digital photography an interely different animal so why force people into the mindset of the former centurys analoque art let them make their own minds up and maybe even repeat the mistakes searching for a "woice" of their own.

    Hey someone called me ignorant whaiii at last

    Best regards
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  4. #224

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,333
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I'm not sure how much this post was tongue-in-cheek, but to the extent that it's serious, I think you're conflating technique (which of course is often highly specific to materials and workflow) with artistic concerns (which mostly aren't). The OP and most of this thread were, I think, talking mainly about the latter.
    Only just a tiny bit tongue in the cheek.
    I know there is a difference between technique and artistic content but as I see it the ones starting up in photography are also artistic inspired by the ones teaching the techniques so I think the one follows the other so to say

    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    That said, I think if I were going to send an aspiring photographer forth to learn about the artistic uses of lighting, the first name I pulled out wouldn't be a photographer, it'd be Goya. Apart from techniques, I'm not sure there's any special reason why photographers should be privileged over painters in the *artistic* education of an aspiring photographer; composition is composition whether it's rendered in silver or oil or pixels, right? But you never hear photographic educators complaining that their students have never seen a Renoir.

    -NT
    Yeps art before photography

    Best regards
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  5. #225
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,086
    Images
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    Since the thread has evolved a little, and meaning no slight on the past masters mentioned; Who are the comtemporary masters?
    I think the new topographics photographers continue to be influential. I had the good fortune to take a workshop with Mark Klett. He was delighted when he saw what he thought was a paper cup on the ground in what was otherwise a pristine landscape. I told him it wasn't, rather it was a large leaf that looked like a white cup in the monochrome print. He was disappointed, but amused. The point is that that was my first exposure to the contemporary demand for irony which seems to have permeated contemporary photography to an inordinate degree.

    In color work, bland overhead lighting, deadpan human subjects, utterly banal landscapes and seemingly random compositions are our contemporary influences...deliberately antithetical to the positive regard for all those imperatives that are the legacy of the 20th century modernists.

    Another significant contemporary influence is the minimalism of Michael Kenna and so many of us who pay him homage with our minimalist, sepia toned images. Sticks in the water, the lone tree in the field, long exposure water with a single coi, etc. continue to be very popular.

    A very well known symphony conductor and teacher of conductors calls tradition, "the memory of the last bad performance." In other words, he insists that things not continue to be done just because they already have been done and accepted, and we are used to them. But, it takes singular vision, and a huge amount of courage to make photographs that haven't been made (and approved!!) before. Maybe, for the sake of such originality, too much exposure to photographic history is not a good thing!
    John Voss

    My Blog

  6. #226
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,363
    Images
    225

    Loss of fine art photography tradition

    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren View Post
    Might as well. The ones governing our countries don't seem to care anyway so why should we?
    I dont think history in all and the history of photography relate or has much in common in relation to this subject. The way things evolve in this era with all this new technology etc I see little reason to demand that young photogs know about the master of....

    ....Hey someone called me ignorant whaiii at last

    Best regards
    I will only agree with you in the sense that if the current generation learned from the former generation who learned from the "great masters" then inherently there is knowledge and technique in the students of the great masters work, therefore through lineage I may gleam some knowledge of the past, but only if I studied the older established contemporary masters of today and only if they learned from the great masters.... It's a generational learning ...

    But in art there is repetition, short heals, tall heals back and forth, popularity is ever changing, Peter Lik may be popular now but unpopular in 50 years when some new photog produces only dull imagery rather than bright colors, dull being the fad like in the 1950's drab colors which were then popular.

    But learning about as many photographers new and old, will give you a MUCH more rounded perspective, enable you to pull from the best of techniques and styles that fit with your own style, if you have no exposure to that you'll never have a concept of it.

    So history is important both in art and in the world. Repeating history in the art world is a little more acceptable (like when someone told me my model work reminded them if Helmut Newton and I had to look up to see who that was because I was ignorant, only to discover I was flattered by the compliment) but without knowing I had repeated a style, (but only vaguely in my opinion) however seeing the work gave me new ideas...

    Anyway I thing I've said enough.



    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #227
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,295
    Images
    302
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    I have seen versions of this story over and over and over.

    The important part of art, IMO, is the inspiration and attempt at expression.
    Well, you hear what you want to hear.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #228

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    51
    Hey all,

    I just wanted to chime in to say thanks for discussing this at length, and that I hope the discussion continues (especially now that it seems to have lost it's somewhat...competitive tone).

    While I certainly bring my own past, my own opinions, and my own tastes...through which I'm viewing the thread, I'm learning a lot from my spot over here against the wall.

    As someone with little, or more accurately nearly no art background (if anything, a somewhat non-art or even anti-art background), I don't really feel it's my place to opine on the subject, regardless of what those opinions may be...but I did want to make sure to thank everyone who's presented each/every side they have. I look forward to continuing on with reading the posts here for some time.

    Thanks,

    Mark

  9. #229

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    16,412
    Blog Entries
    2
    hi mark

    people with no art background or anti art background like you ...
    have probably even more of a valid opinion than those who are steeped in whatever tradition they have.

    while i have a background in both art+architecture, as well as photography, for the most part,
    i don't know most of the current big influences people typically mention ... i would rather be
    out of the loop than in the loop ... besides, i find a lot of contemporary photography to be kind of boring

    so, chime in, give your opinion, it is just as relevant as anyone elses ( just like the photographs you make ) ...

    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 03-19-2013 at 08:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #230
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,751
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Well, you hear what you want to hear.
    And I like those stories.

    Art too often gets hung up in over thinking things or in making money.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin