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  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
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    When you know itís in the can, or do you?

    Some years ago I use to think that sometimes when taking a photograph, that I knew I had got the image I wanted seconds after pressing the shutter. However, Iím not sure that always proved to be the case and now I never seem to know, but am sometimes confronted by surprises good and bad. Do others ever get that feeling and if so, are you in most part right or wrong?

    ďThe contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of inventionĒ

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2
    blansky's Avatar
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    The more experienced you are the more you "know" what you got.

    That being said. the difference between "experiencing" a scene, or especially a person, and what was captured on the film or card is often a long ways from what you thought you got.

    People are an enigma to how they come across in film/digital. You're never really sure although you know you got the elements right like lighting etc. you really never know how much the camera 'loves' them.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #3
    erikg's Avatar
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    You don't knows until you know.

  4. #4
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    I'm never really sure. But then for me that's a plus for film. I get three anticipatory opportunities. Taking, developing the film and finally a print. Each step may be days, weeks or even months apart so I get a lot of mileage out of a single exposure.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    In numerous cases when I pressed the shutter, and luckily I've not screwed up yet, it's very rare I make two identical negatives but if I can I do when I have that deep gut instict - as I mostly shoot LF I process one first before the other.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    You don't knows until you know.
    +1

    thanks yogi!
    ask me how ..

  7. #7
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    I think it works both ways for me, in good and bad ways. Sometimes I get 'a great shot' after I click the shutter, but when I develop and scan and look at it, it's no good.
    But then, sometimes as I take a shot I see someone start to change their expression or position (I take a lot of photos of people on stages in dimly lit rooms, they're performing and moving, and shutter speed are low) just as I press the trigger, and think it's wasted. Then when I get home and look at the result, i'm pleasantly surprised and it's the best shot on the roll.

    Surely more skill on my part would negate both of those, but I'd rather lose some good shots to have the pleasant surprises than to just have more decent with no surprises.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  8. #8
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Croubie View Post

    Surely more skill on my part would negate both of those, but I'd rather lose some good shots to have the pleasant surprises than to just have more decent with no surprises.
    No matter who you are or what your skill level, in photography there are always surprises.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  9. #9
    wildbill's Avatar
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    I like suprises but often there are those shots that I know will be excellent. Then i process the film to find scratches or something along those lines
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  10. #10

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    Generally speaking, yes. Sometimes, though, there are surprises - both kinds: shots "known" to be great that were lousy and shots believed to be "lousy" that turned out OK.

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