Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,814   Online: 733
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29
  1. #11
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I think to criticise any image by saying a person in the picture or not would make it better, is not really possible. It is only when you see the image from the point of capture and composition and the way it is then portrayed through printing/contrast etc., that it has any valid meaning or not. It is very easy to criticize any image, but unless you have something to compare it with, the criticism is seldom valid.
    The op questions what would have had to happen for the picture to work.

    I stated my opinion.

    YMMV
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    It is very easy to criticize any image, but unless you have something to compare it with, the criticism is seldom valid.
    Well this is it. It holds up in comparison with his other work, stylistically - there's artistic intention.

    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    It looks so easy - f8 and be there. But first thing what photographer who wants to have this kind of lucky moments captured is to have many kilometers in his shoes .
    For most photographers responding to such a scene (especially today with our phones) this would be a straight reportage shot, given its sporadic nature. So what I was saying in the OP was; he has clearly responded to more than the fire. A potential news story for most has become a diorama in his hands, which I find beguiling.

    In making a colour edit I was trying to remove some of the aesthetic intention, but even there, in essential construct it still remains anything but an illustration of an 'event'.
    Last edited by batwister; 05-19-2013 at 06:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  3. #13
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,182
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    e.

    Joel Sternfeld of course is another photographer who applies colour theory to fleeting juxtapositions.
    Though he would have paid the owner to burn the car on his cue...or buy a pumpkin while the car was burning...

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    Looks to me like a rather mundane lucky happenstance of a car on fire. There's nothing in the picture that I find all that great or impactful.
    Hopefully, as photographers who would wish the same, we'd have the courtesy to give the picture a fair reading. Of course, it is a picture of a relatively rare event and, photography is in some measure about simply being there. Let's give him the benefit of the doubt then?
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  5. #15
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,206
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    For some reason the picture reminds me of the 1970 album cover "pink floyd wish you were here".
    I don't know though, did Joachim Brohm stage the shot?

    When I played music in the darkroom, "Wish you were here" was on frequent rotation. At my dad's house... darkroom in the basement 1980-1983... one of the semi-darkrooms I had where I could only work at night.

  6. #16
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Hopefully, as photographers who would wish the same, we'd have the courtesy to give the picture a fair reading. Of course, it is a picture of a relatively rare event and, photography is in some measure about simply being there. Let's give him the benefit of the doubt then?
    Don't know his work. Never seen the picture before.

    Still even though you state it's famous, to me it's nothing more than a mundane picture of a car on fire.

    Nothing about it seems to bring it up the scale to being a great picture or even all that interesting.

    There must not be many car fires in the UK?

    When I grew up in Canada I don't recall ever seeing a car on fire. In the US it's pretty common and in fact they always send fire trucks to car accidents.

    Two weeks ago something like 4-5 women burned to death in the back of a limo crossing a bridge into San Francisco.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    There must not be many car fires in the UK?
    That's kind of true and I'll admit, the picture must have some cultural intrigue for me for that reason, but on a more basic level, it's the peculiarities of artistic intention. For the purposes of a discussion, it doesn't really matter if the picture takes your fancy, as I'm trying to be objective about its making myself. Like I say, today this would be an iPhone shot in the local newspaper with the headline 'moments before disaster'. Yet it's not about what's actually happening for me, and I dare say the photographer. It's more the mystery of circumstance, which I was trying to address. It's almost the perfect 'found object' for a photographer concerned with documenting the modern city, as it is, yet as an image, it is transcended through a striking response to colour - which creates a kind of push-pull (subjective-aesthetic) effect. So the question that remains for me is, would he have passed by this burning car if the colours 'weren't right' and would you and I? It's interesting to me what we find photographic, why we find it photographic and the connotations of the subject which are either emphasised or rendered incidental through intent.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #18
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,024
    If I had a camera and saw a car burning, I'd see if there was something I could do first. If not, I'd take a picture regardless of paint color..

    I guess the point of the OP is escaping me as those colors are quite common on cars of those years, so the colors didn't enter my consideration of the picture. The flames and the vintage of the auto's are what struck me.

    Also, when the picture was taken is salient. It seems we have far more "silver/grey" cars now than we did back then. It would be difficult to not have colorful cars in a photograph back then.
    Truzi

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    I'd take a picture regardless of paint color..
    I think I probably would too. But, assuming you have your own subjective concerns, would it be a wild card? And therefore would it be a creative photograph which you could contextualise or an illustration for the newspaper? I think for most it would be the latter. Joachim Brohm's is part of a series of bold colour colour pictures and very definitely not a news illustration. There is something ambiguous about it beyond the subject and it is largely to do with colour. It's a photograph about photography, as they say.

    It would be difficult to not have colorful cars in a photograph back then.
    That's very true. I think the bold primaries of cars in the 70s have a lot to do with the emergence of colour art photography, in connection with the New Topographics.

  10. #20
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,024
    The biggest subjective concern I'd have is safety and being able to help. Those aside, I've only seen two or three burning cars in my life - too interesting to pass on aesthetic grounds.

    Seeing that my photography is mostly snapshots/memories, I'd be capturing the moment - so it would be more of the newspaper analogy.

    However, if I had a number of pictures I were displaying for whatever reason (publication, web, slide show, etc), then color (or whatever aesthetic concern I were illustrating) might influence the choice of what I show. The picture would not have been taken for the purpose it would later serve.
    Of course, if I were asked about it, I may not admit how things really transpired

    On the other hand, choosing photos that illustrate a subject is not the same as claiming to have taken it for that purpose. Most avid photographers have quite a portfolio of images to draw from.
    Truzi

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin