Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,968   Posts: 1,523,396   Online: 1138
      
Page 3 of 16 FirstFirst 12345678913 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 152
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It is a few statistically and even fewer who use photography. I may wewll be too many.

    What needs to be taken into account is the the context of an odd family image containing child nudity, which is not the same as intent to make obscene illegal images. The point being innocent people are tared by the deviants if they make images like the OP mentions.

    Ian
    Ian, I have worked in this field.
    The idea that "it is few statistically" is simply false.
    I don't understand on what basis it could be argued that "even fewer ... use photography"

    The point being that abuse within families is a significant and horrible problem that has remained untroubled by public attention; most attention is given to the (truly) few (statistically speaking) "strangers" who abuse children, which allows the rest of the population to maintain the fiction that "this doesn't happen in families".

    Fortunately, this is changing, albeit slowly. One effect of that change is situations occur like that of the OP, where someone's judgment rather failed them.

    However, if inconvenience and unpleasantness for someone like the OP is all that has to be suffered, that's fine by me. It proves that people have had their eyes opened.

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,216
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    Ian, I have worked in this field.
    The idea that "it is few statistically" is simply false.
    I don't understand on what basis it could be argued that "even fewer ... use photography"

    The point being that abuse within families is a significant and horrible problem that has remained untroubled by public attention; most attention is given to the (truly) few (statistically speaking) "strangers" who abuse children, which allows the rest of the population to maintain the fiction that "this doesn't happen in families".

    Fortunately, this is changing, albeit slowly. One effect of that change is situations occur like that of the OP, where someone's judgment rather failed them.

    However, if inconvenience and unpleasantness for someone like the OP is all that has to be suffered, that's fine by me. It proves that people have had their eyes opened.
    I think you miss most points, the issue really is what's normal and what's deviant, my take is I have tfriends whom have been abused and photography isn't/wasn't an issue.

    Ian

  3. #23
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,909
    Images
    6
    Just to be fair to the photo lab, are lab required by law to report naked kid photos to authorities?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    918
    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    However, if inconvenience and unpleasantness for someone like the OP is all that has to be suffered, that's fine by me. It proves that people have had their eyes opened.
    It proves that we are living in a world in which a fear of the unknown dictates our every move. The photograph was destroyed for fear of what might happen. Yes, our eyes have been opened a great deal since 9/11 and the result is that we want to predict every one in a million threat to our comfortable lives, but we can't.

    At the top of the food chain, with as much material comfort and convenience as our species will ever have, I think we have to make up threats in order that we don't just fall asleep. I think pedophilia has only increased in proportion with the population.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,943
    Quote Originally Posted by photopriscilla View Post
    I have to say that this is quite alarming! I can only share that when our daughter needed her passport at age 1 we took a picture of her. It was a charming and natural shot. We live in Florida and it is very hot so she didn't have a shirt on in the photo. Since it was only of her head and shoulders we didn't think anything of it! Needless to say we had to submit a photobooth picture in the end, in which she looks miserable.

    It makes me wonder what photos we have of our kids that could be perceived in an unfavorable light!

    So sorry to hear your story!

    Best,

    Priscilla
    hi priscilla

    sorry to hear your troubles
    but unfortunately the passport office
    has specific rules for passport photographs.
    i don't think your image was rejected because it was a topless photograph,
    but because the head was too small ...
    the head has to be a certain size in the image
    no glasses, &c.
    i used to take them once in a while at a portrait studio ( portrait mill )
    and there was a drawing inside the eyepiece that showed where the head
    was supposed to be ..
    for a RA / green card it is even more strict, specific profile ears uncovered and prominently
    displayed in the small 1x1" image ...

    bon voyage !
    john
    ask me how ..

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    67
    It's all part of the new Zero-tolerance policies that have been enacted in recent years; it enables authorities to NOT have to think through their decisions or pass judgments. And you can thank litigation-mad attorneys and a public who views the justice system as lottery.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    Quote Originally Posted by jumbosilverette View Post
    It's all part of the new Zero-tolerance policies that have been enacted in recent years; it enables authorities to NOT have to think through their decisions or pass judgments. And you can thank litigation-mad attorneys and a public who views the justice system as lottery.
    I don't know about the environment in Australia. Here in the US, I would say the photolab employee could have been guarding himself against the political correctness environment we have. "Zero tolerance" is an expression that blithers from the lips of the political class. Humorously, the following short clip may very well illustrate the best policy:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFTH7u6YGS8
    or
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34ag4nkSh7Q

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,034
    Ultimately, this is where digital has always been the winner. Privacy. The photo lab, nobody, sees any images we don't wish to share. Nobody ever wanted a middleman, especially not a prying middlemen, but somebody had to do the dirty work of developing and printing.

    Makes ya wonder though. With middlemen (of all sorts, from photo labs to schoolteachers to bus drivers) "blowing the whistle" on everything they see or hear (or rather think they saw, or heard) how does any child abuse ever happen? I think too often it happens spontaneously, in anger, and there was no warning. All these prying eyes and well meaning folk never see any signs. When they DO see "signs" they go all gaga and say YES WE GOT ONE and of course it turns out to be nothing of the sort. Just some wasted policeman's time and salary. I'd REALLY REALLY like to know how many times REAL abusers are caught by these practices. If it's 1 out of a hundred, great, but I'm betting one would be hard to find.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  9. #29
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,088
    Images
    60
    Sorry, I cannot agree with some of the posts above. It is not political correctness, it is the result of horrendous behavior by many individuals.

    There are people out there with libraries of pictures of naked children who also engage in horrible physical and sexual abuse of children.

    The "zero tolerance" rules are there to take the discretion out of the hands of people like store clerks and lab employees.

    The discretion and judgment is quite rightly transferred to people who are knowledgeable about the scourge of child abuse.

    The problem with the OP's situation isn't with the lab, it is with the police, who followed up, determined that there was no problem, but confiscated the entirely innocent slide anyways.

    The police may have been forced to confiscate the slide, due to the rules they are required to enforce. If so, those rules need reviewing.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,207
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Sorry, I cannot agree with some of the posts above. It is not political correctness, it is the result of horrendous behavior by many individuals.

    There are people out there with libraries of pictures of naked children who also engage in horrible physical and sexual abuse of children.

    The "zero tolerance" rules are there to take the discretion out of the hands of people like store clerks and lab employees.

    The discretion and judgment is quite rightly transferred to people who are knowledgeable about the scourge of child abuse.

    The problem with the OP's situation isn't with the lab, it is with the police, who followed up, determined that there was no problem, but confiscated the entirely innocent slide anyways.

    The police may have been forced to confiscate the slide, due to the rules they are required to enforce. If so, those rules need reviewing.
    +1

    There was a case here in Minnesota (US) where a father had taken a cell phone video of his kids running around naked. It was his employer provided phone and, when he brought it in for some technical reason, the video was found and police involved. He was charged and only after a while were charges dropped. He was certainly guilty of very poor judgement, but nothing else. None the less, those who found the video and notified police did the right thing.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

Page 3 of 16 FirstFirst 12345678913 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin