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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Feldstein View Post
    In other words, it's common sense.
    Sadly, sometimes it seems there is NOTHING so uncommon as common sense.

  2. #62
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    I couldn't disagree more. It doesn't follow logically that calling someone a pervert implies that they have "serious social phobias and paranoia issues" and nor does it follow from an application of "common sense"
    [Ohhhh nooooooooo ! Not this again]

    So, is that simply your unsubstantiated opinion or are you claiming it as unfactual insight? Rather than a knee-jerk response, think about what I wrote above for awhile, then get back to me.
    _________________________________
    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  3. #63
    Ming Rider's Avatar
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    In an attempt to gain some clarity of the situation and to dampen the unease in this thread, I asked a favour of a friend and as a result, was able to take a brief glimpse into the future of Street and Public Photography.

    Unfortunately, Tapatalk wouldn't let me upload the picture from my iPhone, but you can read the whole sordid story with exclusive photograph on my blog here:-

    http://www.streetphotographyblog.co....t-photography/
    Last edited by Ming Rider; 07-07-2013 at 03:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "All I ask for is an M5 with a fast lens, a roll of HP5 and a street to shoot her by."

    StreetPhotographyBlog

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider View Post
    You need a business card when this happens which you can hand to such a person and tell them that they can download the picture for their album. It helps if you actually are licensed. All legit and all.

    I gave up on the street stuff mostly. Had to many over zealous security guards who thought they were God's law. The shooting was really all for fun, so why weather that crap. Big events are ok tho.
    I thought about that, but you got some a'hole and they may track you down. lots of crazies around.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ming Rider View Post
    . . . the oldest and most honourable form of photography in existence.
    ...
    No, far from it. There was no street photography with Daguerreotype and Calotype (Fox Talbot) photography. Wet plate street photography neither, except with ghost like images where the people passed the long exposure. Dry Gelatine plates in the 1870's started to allow this kind of thing but it really wasn't a thing until gelatine films (1880's) and more portable and/or miniature cameras.

    Aside form that I concur with your sentiment and feel your pain.

  6. #66

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    sorry for your troubles ..
    but if someone gives you dirty looks
    and doesn't want you photographing them
    shouldn't you well .. be respectful of their wishes ?

    if it was my parents, and i showed up with my kids
    and you continued to photograph when you were given
    "the look to leave us alone" i'd be kind of pissed off too ..


    i don't really care how olde or primal or whatever
    street photography is, or that you are using an expensive camera
    when someone suggests or tells you not to
    and you continue, you pretty much deserve what you get ...
    Last edited by jnanian; 07-07-2013 at 03:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    Well it's not merely "taking pictures in a public place." It is taking pictures of someone else's children without permission or even introducing yourself. There are some people that would consider both scenarios rude.

    In the United States we have a constitution. And the first amendment of that constitution guarantees freedom of speech. It is almost like a religious text. But for most of us regardless of what freedoms that passage says it protects we go most of our lives without invoking it's protection. Why? Because regardless of what some piece of legal paper in Washington DC says we are more constrained by societal norms. It's ironic. People complaining about the break down of society because they can't just stalk and shoot other people's children without so much as a "hello" or introduction. Quoting your legal rights to someone is not how I see things getting done on the street in small towns. That to me seems a very urban attitude.

    Well, as a street photog in the style of Bresson we don't ask - we shoot. Sure, sometimes we all ask for a shot. But if we can, the dedicated ones try to work candid.

    Here is page 79 from my book that deals with kids...

    ‘Caught’ ~ Compton, CA 1973


    On a photo forum, a lady asked about how to overcome her fear of photographing kids and strangers on the street. Kids are a wonderful subject for photography. But in this day and age, shooting kids can be tough. One responder suggested she should use a right angle mirror attachment, like a periscope, to sneak candid shots of the kids.

    Can you imagine if I was caught shooting photos of kids with a sneaky mirror attachment? You know what they would think I was doing. I told the lady to be up front and ask permission if she is uncomfortable. But I did not support the spy attachment.

    I also told her, if street photography is going to be such a dreaded fear for her, maybe she should accept the fact that she is not cut out for it. There are many areas the photographer can work in besides street photography.

    I suggested to her she could try areas such as: Nature, Birds, Flowers, Landscapes, Portrait, Sports, Photoshop Composites, Astrophotography, Macro, Architecture, Travel, Abstract, Parades and Events.

    We all have to come to peace with what we do best. In my own case, I aspired to be a fashion and studio photographer. But one day, it sunk in those areas of photography were not what I was suited for. So I accepted that fact and never looked back. I am a street and documentary photographer, and that is what I do best.

    79

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Rights play both ways: you may have a right to photograph in public, but people have a right not to be photographed in a way that violates their personal space.

    Taking casual photos of people in general on the street is probably OK; sitting across from someone and taking (or attempting) to take several photos of their child at close range - without talking to the person first and asking permission - is in bad taste. If someone I didn't know was attempting to take photos of me under similar circumstances, I'd tell the photographer to F-off!
    Don't know if that is true. (US) You can say f off or get in a fight. But the photographer right to shoot is higher than your right to refuse. (at least that is my understanding. correct me if i am wrong.)

    Now with police that say no shooitng. You still have the right to shoot, but they may arrest you and they are in the wrong. But no one cares, might makes right. We just have to do the best we can to figure it all out and stay safe.

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    sorry for your troubles ..
    but if someone gives you dirty looks
    and doesn't want you photographing them
    shouldn't you well .. be respectful of their wishes ?

    if it was my parents, and i showed up with my kids
    and you continued to photograph when you were given
    "the look to leave us alone" i'd be kind of pissed off too ..


    i don't really care how olde or primal or whatever
    street photography is, or that you are using an expensive camera
    when someone suggests or tells you not to
    and you continue, you pretty much deserve what you get ...
    Sure, this is part of the success of street. Don't get too crazy and dnagerous for just one shot. Just move or or wait. Another shot will come up in short order. Don't kill yourself over any one shot.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Absolutely correct. This is where respect and human decency becomes somewhat conflicted with the letter of the law.

    Yes, but this is all subject to opinion. Some people hate taking photos of strangers on the street or the homeless. With their views we would all be out of biz. I try to go by what is legal and temper it with 'some' decency.



 

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