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  1. #141
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    ... she suggested using bleach to clean her teapot!
    What is wrong with that ?

  2. #142
    analoguey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    What is wrong with that ?
    They like it Black?
    (in the context of tea, just realised it can sound many ways.)

    - via tapatalk.

  3. #143
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    What is wrong with that ?
    Really?... And you're from Ye Olde England!!!

    Teapots should be rinsed out with water. No detergents and most definitely no bleach!


    Steve.

  4. #144
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Yes, the trick to getting stains out of a ceramic teapot is salt. Dissolve several tablespoons of salt in hot water, fill the teapot, and let it soak. An hour or so later, come back, dump out the salt water and your teapot will be nice and clean on the inside, and no chemical residue or aftertaste.

  5. #145

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Yes, the trick to getting stains out of a ceramic teapot is salt. Dissolve several tablespoons of salt in hot water, fill the teapot, and let it soak. An hour or so later, come back, dump out the salt water and your teapot will be nice and clean on the inside, and no chemical residue or aftertaste.
    We have a stainless steel coffee maker carafe, which isn't really stainless! I wonder if the salt treatment would work for it.

  6. #146
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    the trick to getting stains out of a ceramic teapot is salt.
    Perhaps... but there's no real reason to get rid of the tea stains.


    Steve.

  7. #147
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Perhaps... but there's no real reason to get rid of the tea stains.


    Steve.
    As long as the inside of the pot isn't crusted black with old tea residue, you're right. But you know how some people are about wanting their 100 year old teapot to look like it's brand new, inside and out...

    As to the not-so-stainless steel, I don't think salt water would be a good idea to apply to something already prone to corrosion. For that, I'd try steel wool to polish it.

  8. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    As long as the inside of the pot isn't crusted black with old tea residue, you're right. But you know how some people are about wanting their 100 year old teapot to look like it's brand new, inside and out...

    As to the not-so-stainless steel, I don't think salt water would be a good idea to apply to something already prone to corrosion. For that, I'd try steel wool to polish it.
    No, Steve is correct full stop.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #149
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Perhaps... but there's no real reason to get rid of the tea stains.


    Steve.
    It's just like a Barbecue or a Wok. You never never clean them, the best flavour comes from the ghost of 100 meals past...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  10. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    As to the not-so-stainless steel, I don't think salt water would be a good idea to apply to something already prone to corrosion. For that, I'd try steel wool to polish it.
    So-called stainless steels contain chromium (and usually nickel) in the alloy. Chromium oxide forms on the surface and forms a hard passivation layer (similar to the aluminum oxide layer that forms naturally on aluminum).
    One should never use steel wool (or steel wool scouring pads such as Brillo) on stainless steel. Fine iron particles from the steel wool can get under the abraded-off chromium oxide surface passivation and then rust.
    If you need to scrub stainless steel with an abrasive, use ScotchBrite or similar non-metallic pads.
    Non-scratch cleansers such as BonAmi can work on less-difficult stains on stainless steel.



 

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