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  1. #21
    clayne's Avatar
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    The only things I lend are to my photographer friends. I have zero fear they will respect my stuff because they are not children and respect the same ethos I do. I've even given cameras away to photographer friends but not once can I remember anything being trashed.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    I'd bring it up. Is the lens alright though?
    Chris - the filter threads are dented pretty good and they had wedged the lens cap on. It was quite difficult to remove it. I don't hear any loose elements in it, but need to explore that further.

    I agree to some extent with posters who have said I missed my chance to talk about it, but we were in a noisy, crowded restaurant at the time. It would have been ghastly for me to bring it up then.

    I've located a nice looking SRT102 for a reasonable price and picked that up. I need to give my daughter a decent tool for her class. Of course, that one could meet the same fate.
    flickr.com/danfogel
    Leica M2, Olympus 35RC, Olympus 35EC, Olympus Trip 35

  3. #23

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    You seem reluctant to bring the issue up to anyone except to us. Then that's the decision. My suggestion, at this point, is to move on, and see what transpires.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #24
    MartinCrabtree's Avatar
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    I'd ask the daughter to show me some of the images she took with it. Just to gently let her know my displeasure. No I'd never be so crass as to mention it or act poorly. Just showing interest may bring about an explanation............or not. But I am sure she'd be aware that you valued that camera w/o a word spoken on the subject.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    I'll be the voice of discontent, since most advice here, thus far, is to forget it and move on.

    If a friend of mine had loaned my daughter a camera and she broke it and then returned it without a word, I'd like to know. As a parent. Something is wrong here. It could be simple ignorance (the damage occurred but wasn't noticed) but it could also be that the child didn't know that it's expected to be returned in the same condition it was loaned in. She may assume this is normal wear and tear. It's sad, but true, how little regard some people, kids or adult, have for material things.

    This is an important moment in the child's life. Doing nothing may save your friendship with the family, but someone is getting away with something.

    I've said my peace. As a parent, I'd want to know. I would literally be brought to tears if my daughter acted like this.
    Agree with all sentiments expressed ^

    My son recently kicked a ball into the neighbor's yard and it broke one of the picket fence beams.

    We went over and told "Ms. Smith" about it and all was great....

    We all felt better about the situation....

    I also asked that my daughter come along to see how Ms Smith reacted and overall moral support of her brother...."all for one, one for all".....figured she will one day damage a neighbor's property and thought she shd see "the process"
    Andy

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    I'll be the voice of discontent, since most advice here, thus far, is to forget it and move on.

    If a friend of mine had loaned my daughter a camera and she broke it and then returned it without a word, I'd like to know. As a parent. Something is wrong here. It could be simple ignorance (the damage occurred but wasn't noticed) but it could also be that the child didn't know that it's expected to be returned in the same condition it was loaned in. She may assume this is normal wear and tear. It's sad, but true, how little regard some people, kids or adult, have for material things.

    This is an important moment in the child's life. Doing nothing may save your friendship with the family, but someone is getting away with something.

    I've said my peace. As a parent, I'd want to know. I would literally be brought to tears if my daughter acted like this.
    Agree 100%. The girl is old enough to know about honesty and responsibility. The fact that the parents handed over an obviously damaged camera without a word is a clue here.

    Were I the OP, I'd be giving some thought to whether or not I want such folks as freinds.

  7. #27

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    Was the camera in some sort of bag? You could always play a little dumb. Even if it wasn't in a bag I guess it could work. Just make it out like they gave you the camera back, and you put it up on the shelf not thinking about it. Then, the "other day" you decided to give the camera spin or something and noticed how dinged up it was.

  8. #28
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    The momentum of our times is to simply ignore one's wrongdoing and hope to get away with it. People, today, are adept at covering their tracks and acting with complete 'innocence'. It is quite amazing how parents seem to not only accept such thinking but also tacitly seem to even approve of it. The 'worst' one can do is ADMIT guilt. The lack of genuine sincerity in today's culture is profound and I find the ones 'excusing such behavior to mere ignorance' as adding to the problem and not meeting it 'half way'. We are taught to adopt such personal exoneration by our plastic culture of 'me, me, and more me'. Sorry to sound so pseudo-psychological but it is true.

    And with everything from cyclists who hit pedestrians and simply ride off to what the OP experienced, the lack of responsiblilty, today, is omnipresent. Again, sorry for ruffling feathers here but I would rather be publicly condemned than not admit this: today children are taught not to do bad because 'they will get caught' instead of the old-school way of not doing wrong because that, in and of itself, it wrong. In the first instance, children quickly develop a way around getting caught and, by inference, are thus OK with the wrongdoing if effectively consummated because an underlying ethics was not even mentioned to the little darlings as being of any real significance. (No, I am not a child hater!)

    Do not lend. Period. That is a nasty admission to make about human relationships but, believe me, you will stay friendlier with such people (even with that demonstrated caveat) after the negative reaction wears off. Better to be somewhat distant and cool with people rather than overly friendly and living the life of making believe you are not a perpetual victim.

    Glad I said that (despite the inevitable reactions). - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 07-30-2013 at 03:55 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

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    There is a good chance the parents did not notice the damage, they may not have really looked at it. I would bring it up to them in a polite gentle way. It may have been the girl, a friend of the girl's or the parents themselves. For now you suspect the girl as being irrresponsible and it may not be the case. I would not ask for them to pay for the camera at this point.

    As far as others stating one should not lend out stuff, that is terrible advise; a good friend of mine is a member of this forum and I borrow more from him than he does from me.

    Some one mentioned not lending money to family members. My brother was terrible at paying back and often would not pay back until you asked him for it. One day I needed some money and borrowed $20 from him. About 3 hours later I returned and gave him the twenty back and his response was "What is this for" and I told him I borrowed it earlier in the day. He shrugged and said that if I said so it must be true. He simply did not remember lending and I think he also did not remember most of the times he borrowed.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    The momentum of our times is to simply ignore one's wrongdoing and hope to get away with it. People, today, are adept at covering their tracks and acting with complete 'innocence'. It is quite amazing how parents seem to not only accept such thinking but also tacitly approve of it. The 'worst' one can do is ADMIT guilt. The lack of genuine sincerity in today's culture is profound and I find the ones 'excusing such behavior to mere ignorance' as adding to the problem. We are taught such omission by our plastic culture of 'me, me, and more me'. Sorry to sound so pseudo-psychological but it is true.

    And with everything from cyclists who hit pedestrians and simply ride off to what the OP experienced, the lack of responsiblilty, today, is omnipresent. Again, sorry for ruffling feathers here but I would rather be publicly condemned than not admit this: today children are taught not to do bad because 'they will get caught' instead of the old-school way of not doing wrong because that, in and of itself, it wrong. In the first instance, children quickly develop a way around getting caught and, by inference, are thus OK with the wrongdoing if effectively consummated because ethics was not even mentioned to the little darlings. (No, I am not a child hater!)

    Do not lend. Period. That is a nasty admission to make about human relationships but, believe me, you will stay friendlier with such people (even with that demonstrated caveat) after the negative reaction wears off. Better to be somewhat distant and cool with people rather than overly friendly and living the life of making believe you are not a perpetual victim. Glad I said that (despite the inevitable reactions). - David Lyga
    There were a lot of people like that when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s too!

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