Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,908   Posts: 1,521,500   Online: 913
      
Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 378910111213
Results 121 to 126 of 126
  1. #121

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,532
    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    Okay, provide an objective formula for discussing photographic imagery. Taken to its (il)logical conclusion, your position is every photograph is the same as another, so long as, presumably, it's exposed correctly? That would put all professional photographers and galleries out of business, as well as a few curators, educators an picture editors. You may view this as A Jolly Good Thing, perhaps you'll enlighten us? Even better, show us a great 21mm or wider shot that doesn't rely on bending stuff for novelty value.
    This could potentially be a discussion, but would go too far off topic re short focal length lenses and the original photo posted in this thread. It is a more generalized thing. But actually you aren't too far off in your assessment of my position. Even exposure is a matter of taste unless it clearly detracts from the purpose of the picture. After decades of study, yes I have come to reject much of what is said not only regarding good or bad photographs, but good or bad art in general. That's a rather crude summation, but anyway. Apologies, the HCB stuff really winds me up.

  2. #122
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Apologies, the HCB stuff really winds me up.
    Why?
    I mean, it's just his opinion. It's based on his approach, his way of seeing, his way of working. What he says is not gospel. But I do consider it, along with what others say. Sometimes different people will say very contradictory things, yet something can be drawn from both. It's common when people give an opinion, they state it as if it's absolute, when we know from experience there is very little that is actually absolute. So one person's words may be used to temper another's, as part of the process of refining our own point of view. Sometimes I've found myself questioning my own thinking because of hearing something I would have once rejected out of hand.

    For many years I disliked the 35mm focal length; it just didn't seem wide enough. I loved the effect of my 28, the "professional look" it gave my pictures. Now I look at some of those pictures and they look distorted, and not as pleasing as they used to (just as a lot of the clothing I wore then doesn't look so cool to me now).
    I challenged myself to try the 35mm focal length, and see what I could do with it. I bought a Pentax-M 24-35/3.5 zoom and started using it, making myself use it at 35mm, and also observing what focal length or lengths I used most if I didn't pay attention to the zoom setting. I found that I often still settled on 28mm, but sometimes that 35mm focal length was just right, yielding a better picture. I found I had to try new things to get what I wanted with it, and I wasn't just doing things the same way as always. By challenging an old prejudice, my seeing improved, my work improved. I was a little surprised I didn't use the 24mm focal length more, with most work at about 28 or 35.

    I do love my 17mm lens. It is a challenge to not make just typical "ultrawide" shots (which I sometimes like to do), but to make pictures with it which alter spatial relationships without it being obvious.

    Maybe my outlook has been influenced by my working-world experience. When I started in the golf course business, I didn't know much. I just fell into it; I was offered a job taking care of a small course, and I took it. I started talking to the guys at the courses around, and was amazed at the differences of opinion. The big country club guys all had beautiful courses and strong opinions, but their agronomic practices widely differed and their irrigation practices were in some cases directly contradictory, and yet they were each well-respected and successful. That turned out to be true on the small courses, too. What I realized I had to do was draw from each, and test the advice on my own course, plus my own ideas, until I came up with what worked best for me- and it turned out to not duplicate any one of them! I later found to my surprise that my irrigation technique matched the conclusions of the University of California turf researchers, but if it hadn't I would not have changed because I had found through experimentation what worked best for me. Then came my move to another course, with different soil, different climate, different turf, and I had to change my approach. I was suddenly working to favor the exact type of grass I had been successfully eradicating at the prior job. Later I went to another course with different conditions and had to learn yet another "best" way. Certain fundamentals held throughout, and I guess those could be called my "style".

    Cartier-Bresson had his approach and his opinions grew from that; name any well known photographer, and you will find they did what worked well for them, and their opinions will reflect that. Some worked in 35mm, others in only medium or large format. Some in medium format used a Pentax 6X7 or Hasselblad with several lenses; others used a Rollei TLR. Some used just one format; some used several. And each could tell you why.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #123

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    northern england
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    580
    Like I said, I only used Cartier-Bresson as an example people might know. I'm not a HCB worshipper, he sometimes talked nonsense, especially regarding the colour work of Martin Parr, but he was largely responsible for setting out the ground rules for what we know of as street photography. One way not to criticise him, as I once overheard at a gallery, is people pulling apart his technique. They said an image showed camera shake or was poorly focused - who really cares when the composition is great?!
    My whole point on this thread is technique, camera, lens, exposure, processing, is all at the service of an idea. When it becomes an end in itself, it's dead, you may as well run a surveillance camera. Ultra wides hold a white flag up to the idea, unless they're used with uncommon skill.

  4. #124
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,164
    Images
    289
    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    My whole point on this thread is technique, camera, lens, exposure, processing, is all at the service of an idea. When it becomes an end in itself, it's dead, you may as well run a surveillance camera.
    I could not have said it better myself. It is all about the picture itself - everything else is there to support the picture, from metering to final print, and maybe even framing and presentation. We choose our tools based on our needs.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #125
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,131
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    Sometimes different people will say very contradictory things, yet something can be drawn from both. It's common when people give an opinion, they state it as if it's absolute, when we know from experience there is very little that is actually absolute. So one person's words may be used to temper another's, as part of the process of refining our own point of view.
    Very powerful sentiment.

  6. #126

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    235
    Of relevance to this thread:

    http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/04/the-lens-is-standard-the-photos-anything-but/

    "Jerome Delay has been on a quest for simplicity while covering some of the most important stories in Africa for The Associated Press. For the last year he has relied almost exclusively on one camera, and one lens, a 50-millimeter F1.4."

Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 378910111213


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin