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  1. #21
    KenS's Avatar
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    Re "Universal appreciation of photographic art"

    Hi Clive,

    Withe reference to your opening sentence
    I understand that Eskimos have more words to describe snow than people who have less experience of snow.
    Note: I am NOT angry

    I'm not sure of where you live.. but 'these days' it is probably more politically correct to refer to the Northern Canadian aboriginal peoples (generally) as Inuit.

    I'm just finishing my BFA at the local university (yeah... at 73 its much easier haul that I expected) and in both my Native Art History courses it was indicated that 'they' prefer Inuit over 'Eskimo' which, if my ageing memory serves me well enough, was the word for 'raw flesh eater'... However.... it is a custom still observed on a successful seal hunt that the raw liver be eaten before it has had time to cool.

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

  2. #22
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenS View Post
    Hi Clive,

    Withe reference to your opening sentence

    Note: I am NOT angry

    I'm not sure of where you live.. but 'these days' it is probably more politically correct to refer to the Northern Canadian aboriginal peoples (generally) as Inuit.

    I'm just finishing my BFA at the local university (yeah... at 73 its much easier haul that I expected) and in both my Native Art History courses it was indicated that 'they' prefer Inuit over 'Eskimo' which, if my ageing memory serves me well enough, was the word for 'raw flesh eater'... However.... it is a custom still observed on a successful seal hunt that the raw liver be eaten before it has had time to cool.

    Ken
    I stand corrected and perhaps I should have said Inuit, as Eskimo is probably more a generic term.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #23

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    If the neighboring tribes referred to the Inuit as "eaters of raw flesh" I wonder what the Inuit called their neighbors?

    My reaction to most political correctness is colored by the legal maxim De minimis non curat lex. I remember reading an article in the Orlando Seninel scolding its readers not to refer to a particular type of radio as a "ghetto blaster." Do the radios get offended when they hear this term? So little of what is termed political correctness rises above mere silliness. Words have no power over us unless we give them this power. I learned this from my great uncle who lost his sight at the age of 18. Never once did I ever hear him express any self pity. If anyone had said that he was "challenged" he would have laughed at them and said something like "No you damn fool I'm blind." He had his own successful furniture business.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-21-2013 at 12:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #24

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    If the pictures had some kind of aesthetic slant (with snow it would surely be about subtle tonalities, light and formal studies of drifts, etc), they wouldn't get it. They would need some understanding of the art of photography - which is an invention of western culture. An Inuit would read a photograph simply as a slightly beguiling illustration - meaning they might be able to identify a certain consistency of snow*, but the aesthetic appeal of the pictures would be lost on them. The art of photography isn't universal in that case.

    *I read something about indigenous Africans being shown photographs of flies that carried diseases, but they couldn't identify them because the pictures were macro. They had never seen flies magnified before, so couldn't process what they were seeing. In many ways, you can't see what you haven't seen before. A photograph shows the world in two dimensions, so the information is distorted from the get go. Snow, in a photograph, especially if it's covering the entire frame, can appear abstract even to us.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  5. #25

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    Philosophy professor Denis Dutton suggests a Darwinian explanation of universal beauty being hard wired into our DNA. He talks about landscapes and art starting at 7:00.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/denis_dutto...of_beauty.html
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

  6. #26
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    Philosophy professor Denis Dutton suggests a Darwinian explanation of universal beauty being hard wired into our DNA. He talks about landscapes and art starting at 7:00.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/denis_dutto...of_beauty.html
    A very interesting link, thank you. I haven't had time to view it all yet, but it is just the sort of thing I hoped my OP would throw up.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #27
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    Jesus if you want to get upset about Inuit vs Eskimo which of course should be decided by the people themselves what they wish to be called how about the travesty of calling aboriginal Canadian and US people "Indians".

    Columbus, and his fellow explorers, for Christ sakes was looking for fucking India/Indies when he stumbles upon the Dominican Republic and later South America and called the people Indians. And that was 1492ish. He never actually landed in discovered or set foot in N America. In fact the first people here, the aboriginals DISCOVERED N. America and then probably the Vikings and before them maybe the Chinese and before that maybe the Polynesians. The first European was John Cabot in 1497 and Amerigo Vespucci in 1499.

    And today we still in many circles call native people such a stupid derogatory mistake.

    Un-fucking-believable.
    Last edited by blansky; 08-23-2013 at 12:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #28
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    I'd bet if someone asked them if they don't want to be called Eskimo, they'd be Inuit.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #29
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    Philosophy professor Denis Dutton suggests a Darwinian explanation of universal beauty being hard wired into our DNA. He talks about landscapes and art starting at 7:00.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/denis_dutto...of_beauty.html
    Not sure if I agree with Denis, perhaps some of it, but where do certain genres fit in? Such as Expressionism and Pop Art?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Not sure if I agree with Denis, perhaps some of it, but where do certain genres fit in? Such as Expressionism and Pop Art?
    In the part about the stone axes he mentions that the complicated, beautiful and useless ones made by pre-humans probably attracted mates by showing that they had originality and could acquire great skill at something difficult, but useless. After millions of years, similar behavior would still be hardwired into our brains, with cultural differences producing Wagnerian opera, rap music and macrame.
    Last edited by pbromaghin; 08-23-2013 at 05:11 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: grammar
    A politician is a man who will double cross that bridge when he comes to it.

    Oscar Levant

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