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  1. #11

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    Really great replies so far in this thread, I love this section of the board because it always generates great discussion.

    Do you guys think that having this "double" (or even triple in Thomas's case) life is something that can effect us on a deeper psychological level?

  2. #12
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    Do you guys think that having this "double" (or even triple in Thomas's case) life is something that can effect us on a deeper psychological level?
    Yes, and I think that's a good thing. I too am an engineer (software) and photography gets me away from computerized stuff. I also coach my daughters soccer team and that three way pull really leads to deeply split personalities.

    At least 12 and 13 years olds don't permit you to get old.
    All this has happened before, and all this will happen again.

  3. #13

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    I think that "double life" feeling is normal for people who have an avocation. Maybe it's more noticeable for people who actually like their day jobs, though---if your job is an unpleasant "just a job" thing, you likely won't feel very torn between it and your "real" life.

    The two used to be more integrated for me, when I was travelling for work with a consistent group of people. There were a lot of pretty serious travel photographers in that group, though not very much use of film. (Admittedly, digital was a real convenience in that everyone could share their photos at the end of the meeting---people used to drop them on the meeting file server so that anyone who wanted to could download a copy of the whole pile. It was fun and would have been impractical with film.)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    Really great replies so far in this thread, I love this section of the board because it always generates great discussion.

    Do you guys think that having this "double" (or even triple in Thomas's case) life is something that can effect us on a deeper psychological level?
    We spend so much time at work that it does shape us; there's no escaping it.

    In the same way I think that our endeavors in the arts and interests shape us; how can they not? When you deeply immerse yourself in something, it has a profound effect on you, how you see the world and act in it. I call my photography my 'insanity asylum', for two reasons: there is a lot about the world that is broken, with respect to humanity versus the greedy money grabbers, but it's also to disconnect and escape from the constraints of the work place.

    Now, when you immerse in both your work world, and your free thinking space of the arts, I believe the mix is good on a psychological level because at least I get in touch with different parts of my brain. Work is very structured and a logical place, filled with ups and downs in results and frustration - but always a role play. Nothing I do at work, or get exposed to at work, I take personally. But it's there in the subconscious, because we spend so much of our living hours there. This is good for me, because I'm a bit of a scatter brain, and that shows heavily in my photography, which is where I basically let the ideas and concepts rip freely, to come out and rear themselves in ugly and beautiful ways. It is a much more sensory type of existence, feeling my way, laying tone in the prints to accentuate what I feel.

    So, the summary psychological effect is that I'm able to explore both my logical and structured brain, and the intuitive and emotional one.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
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    I think the division between what we do "all day" and whatever other interests or passions we have is a product of the work-a-day culture. We identify with our "full time" pursuits. So what do you think someone like Leonardo said he was when asked what he "did." Was he an artist, scientist, inventor, anatomist? Perhaps all of us who have multiple passions are just renaissance people.

  6. #16
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    For many (most?) of us, this is the one area where we're not bound by the expectations of others. Whether it's clients, bosses, co-workers, family, etc., it often seems our lives (and our time) belong to others. When we're doing photography, our only obligation is to satisfy ourselves.
    We should consider ourselves fortunate to lead these "double lives" (triple is a bit much, Thomas... ). I know far too many people without much in the way of outside interests. You know the feeling you get when you take a print off the drying rack and think, "Wow... I can't believe I made this"? 99% of the world never experiences that moment. Embrace your separate lives!

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    For many (most?) of us, this is the one area where we're not bound by the expectations of others. Whether it's clients, bosses, co-workers, family, etc., it often seems our lives (and our time) belong to others. When we're doing photography, our only obligation is to satisfy ourselves.
    We should consider ourselves fortunate to lead these "double lives" (triple is a bit much, Thomas... ). I know far too many people without much in the way of outside interests. You know the feeling you get when you take a print off the drying rack and think, "Wow... I can't believe I made this"? 99% of the world never experiences that moment. Embrace your separate lives!
    I agree entirely. Well said. Alex.

  8. #18
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    People tend to define themselves to themselves by what they love doing, and who they really are, not what they have to do to make a living.
    Ben

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    We spend so much time at work that it does shape us; there's no escaping it.
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    People tend to define themselves to themselves by what they love doing, and who they really are, not what they have to do to make a living.
    I was in an exhibition a few years back, while I was still working (retired, now, thanks), and several people from my office actually came to the opening reception. To one particular individual for whom our job was HIS defining task, I remarked that "this (photography) is why it will not say 'auditor' on my tombstone."

  10. #20
    MDR
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    I work with photography and film in my pro life but stil lead another photographic live when I do my personal work. I even wear a cape on my photographic outings ok it's a Darkcloth.

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