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  1. #11

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    We always buy Canadian or American if we can find it. Will not even go into Wal-Mart cuz we know it is all junk. Photo chemicals and paper are expensive. No argument from me. But they always were. It is not a cheap hobby and if you are not aware of the costs, do some research before getting into it. And cheap film and paper seem to be the perfect example of getting what you pay for. Don

  2. #12

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    I'm less sure that the 21st Century market economics are as simple as they are sometimes described, although I tend to broadly agree that product will cease to be made if too few people buy it.

    Only slightly tangentially, where is all the TSF and Xray film being coated? If in the same plants as the mainstream photographic films, then to some minor extent that may also support photo film (in the sense that it will contribute to volume production that makes the plants viable; the flaw in this argument is rather obvious, of course, but there might be a grain of truth)

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider View Post
    In my own job I stress the the difference between this product being American made and costing a little more and that same specification product being Chinese produced and costing less. I am happy to remark that many will buy the American made product when it is promoted to support American jobs, and many of those buying it are people who have fought in our war's from Vietnam to present day. Those who buy the Chinese made product are generally those not born in the U.S. or where there is no onshore American made product.
    I wasn't born in the US but I live here therefor adamantly try to buy made in America. Except Ilford of course

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by lightwisps View Post

    Will not even go into Wal-Mart cuz we know it is all junk. (snip)

    Don
    Can't afford go into Wal-mart, 'cos I'd have to spend too much to be able to "blend in" and not seem too "out of place" (from what I've seen of some of their clientel 'on-line'...).

    8-)

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

  5. #15
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    There is nothing at all threatening (to regular, routine films) about using and experimenting with different media, whether it be X-ray, IR, false-colour or anything else one comes across. That is backward thinking. You'd be surprised how many APUG members have produced startling, evocative and technical work using X-Ray and alternate media types, quite apart from their usual work in traditional film media.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #16
    Fixcinater's Avatar
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    Poisson, you're missing the point: if I buy and shoot only x-ray film, the quality of the art I create is irrelevant. The fact is, I'd be using (and therefore buying) the x-ray film as a direct stand-in for Tri-X or whatever other photographic film. Rare is it that one would buy significant quantities of both the cheaper substitute and the expensive name brand option.

    You buy a pair of nice running shoes and pair of cheap knock-off running shoes, you're always going to run in the better pair. Some might say they would use the cheap pair for muddy running or what-have-you, but if you prefer the better/spendier shoes, you'll use those as much as you can convince yourself to.

  7. #17

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    At a hundred bucks for 10 sheets of 8x10, the good stuff for me is totally out.

  8. #18
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fixcinater View Post
    Poisson, you're missing the point: if I buy and shoot only x-ray film, the quality of the art I create is irrelevant. The fact is, I'd be using (and therefore buying) the x-ray film as a direct stand-in for Tri-X or whatever other photographic film. Rare is it that one would buy significant quantities of both the cheaper substitute and the expensive name brand option.

    You buy a pair of nice running shoes and pair of cheap knock-off running shoes, you're always going to run in the better pair. Some might say they would use the cheap pair for muddy running or what-have-you, but if you prefer the better/spendier shoes, you'll use those as much as you can convince yourself to.


    No, not that rare at all.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #19

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    Film aimed for a kind of mass produced perfection that was stolen from under its nose by digital photography. This forced film enthusiasts to re-think film's unique character, and it didn't always come out looking like Kodachrome, at least not enough like it to keep a few thousand citizens employed making it. While I mourn the passing of some great films as much as the next man, film may well pass into a creative niche like etching and lithography, and other former mass mediums that still live on through people who care enough to use them. There are a sufficient numbers of film users to consolidate the surviving manufacturers into very healthy companies, and if they push prices to boutique levels, we can return to the processes of our Victorian forebears and get our hands dirty again.

  10. #20

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    So far as I'm concerned film has become a creative niche, as blockend suggests. I certainly use much less than I did even 10 years ago, but I get much more pleasure and satisfaction in being selective in shooting and in trying to produce the best results I can.

    The "family" and "record" snapshotting, which I once did on film is now done on digital, with a pocket point-and-shoot which can be in my pocket or car all the time to catch the unexpected random shots.

    I use "quality" film and supplies (that's not confined to Kodak/Ilford) for both techniques, but price has certainly affected my style and volume of shooting.

    It's never been a cheap hobby, but I have great negatives and prints made by my grandfather in the late 1940's and early 50's using war surplus film and paper (some prints have "RAF" back-printing!) and a home-built enlarger, when there was nothing else available in the shops....

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