Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,972   Posts: 1,558,668   Online: 995
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,773
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by semi-ambivalent View Post
    Sounds like a man trying to escape his past,
    So... why is that a bad thing?

    I read an article a little while back that posited that being able to endure boredom was one of the biggest challenges we face in our work lives and that being able to endure boredom at work was becoming a key to career success. (Sorry don't remember where I saw it.)

    I know this has played out in my own life over and over. Once I have grown creatively/professionally/technically to a point where I've mastered each the various crafts/skills/task in my life/work (most being non-photographic) my interest in them tends to wane. I need creative challenge/growth to maintain my interest. I've given up on both failing and successful career paths to improve my life.

    Specifically related to HCB's choice to switch, I fully empathize with him. I have experimented a bit with painting and drawing and it has some very distinct creative advantages over photography, like contrast and exposure controls, there are simply no burnt highlights or blocked shadows unless I paint them that way. Being able to choose the color and brightness at will between canvass white and the black of the paint allows adjustment of the subject matter at will regardless of reality, the mood/feel of a piece can be changed from right to left at my whim, the laws of physics don't apply to the subject matter/ideas I might choose to paint, the list goes on but you get the idea.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    657
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    So... why is that a bad thing?

    I read an article a little while back that posited that being able to endure boredom was one of the biggest challenges we face in our work lives and that being able to endure boredom at work was becoming a key to career success. (Sorry don't remember where I saw it.)

    I know this has played out in my own life over and over. Once I have grown creatively/professionally/technically to a point where I've mastered each the various crafts/skills/task in my life/work (most being non-photographic) my interest in them tends to wane. I need creative challenge/growth to maintain my interest. I've given up on both failing and successful career paths to improve my life.

    Specifically related to HCB's choice to switch, I fully empathize with him. I have experimented a bit with painting and drawing and it has some very distinct creative advantages over photography, like contrast and exposure controls, there are simply no burnt highlights or blocked shadows unless I paint them that way. Being able to choose the color and brightness at will between canvass white and the black of the paint allows adjustment of the subject matter at will regardless of reality, the mood/feel of a piece can be changed from right to left at my whim, the laws of physics don't apply to the subject matter/ideas I might choose to paint, the list goes on but you get the idea.
    I just find it peculiar that someone would spend almost his entire creative period (we're talking decades here) in one discipline and then rather simply dismiss it as 'only a path' to the discipline he adopts 'late' in life; the one that really counts. I'm sure my opinion is colored by my not liking all that much of Bresson's photography, and I certainly don't care for the cult of personality that has grown up around him. I think he had a good streak of arrogance-of-fame in him. <shrug>. About painting per se, I think people should paint if they want to, if they want to. My remarks are directed towards the Castelli type of business arrogance being transferred to the media being represented. Like in the way the cognoscenti dismissed Grandma Moses. That's why I wrote 'Painting' rather than 'painting'. As an aside, I too have a tendency to become bored with that at which I've become good (by some measure). It's led to a rather checkered career; bad thing, if I measured myself by my career. Photography has given me lots of space before I could consider myself good.
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  3. #13
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,773
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    I don't find it odd in the least, most of my career has been centered around mechanical things. It has paid the bills and provided moments of interest and I got good at each facet I tried but I am so flipping tired of things with engines that when I change careers again I don't even want to own a car or drive anymore. Engines, cars, machines, and the industries around them have never been my calling, just my day job.

    So I can easily see HCB being in a similar boat, he found a good way to make a living, rode that wave, and paid the bills for many years.

    I can also understand that once his retirement account was full, that he could and would move on to/back to something he enjoyed more. Actually the craft that he originally trained for before entering photography.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,567
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    10
    hi mark

    while i think that often times content matters, the way you got there matters too.
    photography is a very personal thing. subject matter is personal, photographers somehow
    get interested in certain aspects of life or "stuff" and document it. then ... they create
    a physical object to almost memorialize the thing they saw or did ...

    most people see a photograph of something, shrug their shoulders and say " nice photograph"
    or they say " i don't get it " or they don't say a thing .. it doesn't matter to them the
    effort it took to make the physical object, or the connection the photographer had to the subject.

    to some .. momus' photograph of the out of focus, vignetted cornered photograph of the back of peoples'
    heads on their lunch / or cigarette break might be just that, a bad-photograph, to the person taking it
    it might offer a glimpse into something else, maybe a dream s/he had, maybe it was the way the hair vanished
    no one will ever know unless the person is asked " what is this about " .. not "what is this"

    i have to admit, most of the time when someone sees
    some strange thing i have done, they just ask " what is it" ...
    it is the what is this about that means something ...
    a photographic image is about something different than what is in the "picture" ...

    not sure if this makes sense or not

    john

  5. #15
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,773
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    John I don't disagree with you or your experience. I'm also not trying to bash craft or suggest it is unimportant.

    Part of what I am trying to bring out here is that as photographers we need to be square with ourselves about who the audience is. We can be our own audiences, or the photo can be made for different audiences like our family, our descendants, or a commercial market.

    The advantage that I find in shooting for audiences other than myself is that it challenges me more, it helps me learn and improve, I get the privilege of a judge other than myself, someone that can give me constructive feedback. This is a great test of one's craftsmanship, to be able to find out if we've got the chops to do a particular job is exhilarating. This does carry some social/psycological risk in that others might not like what I've done.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 09-29-2013 at 05:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,392
    Images
    299
    The craft serves the content.

    My work is all about trying to show something that I feel, think, or see. It's ideas and emotions. Maybe I try to describe what it feels like to stand by the ocean and inhale the atmosphere, feeling good. Or it could be about an idea of something that is important but people often forget about, little reminders.

    Everything, and I mean everything, that I do from taking a light metering to spotting and mounting the finished print, is subservient to that one final goal - to communicate my feeling, idea, or vision.

    The moment that it becomes about a certain technique, or an idea surrounding a photographic concept, like depth of field, a certain material, or a particular type of camera, I will try to remain objective and call it a day.
    Art is about expression, right? Expression comes from something that is within us and our experiences. To get that stuff out and on to paper would constitute an artistic endeavor the way I see it. Everything else can perhaps be an enjoyable thing to do, but not something that I would find worthwhile.

    Finally, in what we do, time matters. The older our photographs are, the more they become impossible to revisit. Things change, but we documented something at a specific point in time. Today I notice how portraits I made of people many years ago have a different meaning, and represent a time capsule. That dynamic I find very interesting, so to be able to treat each of those moments with enough respect to preserve them the very best we can, or to describe what we saw, perhaps to remind ourselves or others some day of what happened a long time ago. Here craft really matters, because we change too. When we create prints in our darkrooms, we swing from one year or decade to the next in how we want to present our work. Lately I've been printing very dark, and some day down the road I will revisit the prints I make today, and maybe look at them with fresh eyes.
    Our expression reflects who we are, and our craft that's embedded in our prints is a window to look through, to perhaps get something more than content from the experience. We owe it to our art work to improve our craft, to evolve, and to do our utmost to show what we wanted to show. That is why craft is important. Not materials, but how to use our tools.

    Those are my two cents.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #17
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Part of what I am trying to bring out here is that as photographers we need to be square with ourselves about who the audience is.
    Why? I think this is a bit backwards. If it's a good photograph, the proper audience will come.

    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    The advantage that I find in shooting for audiences other than myself is that it challenges me more, it helps me learn and improve, I get the privilege of a judge other than myself, someone that can give me constructive feedback. This is a great test of one's craftsmanship, to be able to find out if we've got the chops to do a particular job is exhilarating. This does carry some social/psycological risk in that others might not like what I've done.
    I think the only time you should be "shooting for audiences other than" yourself is when doing commercial work. When you're being paid, you have an obligation to the client. In creating "art", your only obligation is to yourself. I'm also not sure how you'd gauge outside "judging". How are you quantifying the feedback? If 6 out of 10 like it, does it prove you have the chops? If 4 out of 10, you don't?

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,773
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Why? I think this is a bit backwards. If it's a good photograph, the proper audience will come.
    Nope, not the way the world works, won't come unless you put it in front of somebody. Good example of this concept is Vivian Maier, a huge body of work with lots of good stuff in it, nothing happened with it until somebody put it in front of the right audience.

    So, specifically, how will your "proper audience" find your good photos? Who exactly are those people? What do they want to see?

    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I think the only time you should be "shooting for audiences other than" yourself is when doing commercial work. When you're being paid, you have an obligation to the client. In creating "art", your only obligation is to yourself. I'm also not sure how you'd gauge outside "judging". How are you quantifying the feedback? If 6 out of 10 like it, does it prove you have the chops? If 4 out of 10, you don't?
    If the audience is just you, you are the judge and jury, do what you darn well please, like Vivian Maier.

    If you are going to try and sell your work, you will sell more if you understand what your market wants.

    As to how I judge my feedback is more artistic than numeric. If 4 in 10 people liked a photo I did, that would indicate a truly huge market; for example 4 of 10 American's liking my work would mean a market/following of over 100 million people. Truly unrealistic to think I could get there.

    I do listen carefully to both positive and negative, I listen for clues as to the sincerity too. If its BS being thrown my way I want to know.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    So, specifically, how will your "proper audience" find your good photos? Who exactly are those people? What do they want to see?
    I just assumed it would be hanging somewhere a lot of people would see it. A gallery, art festival, coffee shop, etc. By "proper audience", I mean the people who make a purchase.

    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    If you are going to try and sell your work, you will sell more if you understand what your market wants.
    I sell a good bit of work, through galleries, and art festivals. In galleries, I get very little feedback (other than sales figures) because I'm not there, other than the opening. At festivals, I get a lot, both through sales figures, and comments. After about 20 years (and roughly 200 festivals), I've come to the conclusion that people pay 50% because they like the work, and 50% because they like you. If they love the work, but think you're a self-important jerk, they won't buy. What your market wants is passion and honesty. Audiences are more sophisticated than they're usually given credit. I know many, on the art fair circuit, who have been sure they've come up with a "can't-miss" product. They're wrong about 90% of the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    As to how I judge my feedback is more artistic than numeric. If 4 in 10 people liked a photo I did, that would indicate a truly huge market...
    I agree. I've done numerous festivals with 50-100,000 attendees. I only need 10-20 of them to consider it a success.

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,773
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Eddie the step of getting hung in a galley or restaurant and making a sale, while normal/assumed for you, would for most people be a huge leap outside of their normal world.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin