Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,296   Posts: 1,535,721   Online: 880
      
Page 10 of 12 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 113
  1. #91

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Castle Rock, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,350
    Images
    58
    Hmmm. The harder I work, the luckier I get.
    All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. Choose the one that has heart.

    Don Juan

  2. #92

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    919
    Well, from the horses mouth:

    The idea of making an ongoing creative life – whether as a writer, an artist, a filmmaker or a musician – is difficult unless one gets a foothold on the ladder, as I was lucky enough to do. I say "lucky" because I have no illusions that talent is enough; there are plenty of talented folks out there who never get the break they deserve.
    From David Byrne article in today's Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...reative-talent
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  3. #93
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    808
    Images
    6
    I think the main problem is that photography as practiced by the younger generation is almost entirely autobiographical. They've been raised to think exclusively about themselves and their photographs reflect that. Look at the rise of the "selfie" if you need any evidence to this point.

    The thing I love most about photography is that, while working, I'm thinking intensely about the subject. It's a meditation, not an introspection.

    You ask young photographers "what this picture about?" and count how many times the answer starts with "I."

    "I was feeling this...."

    Barf.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  4. #94
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    That's a little bitter?
    Actually not bitter or emotional at all. I've been really lucky all my life.

    And not really about photography per se either.

    Its just, after sixty years on the planet, I've come to some conclusions or thesis that its maybe all about luck/destiny/good fortune and very little about the self proclaimed "hard work".

    Obviously you have to work at whatever you do, BUT some of this good fortune seems far too pre determined to me to be random.

    And I'm not just talking about winning the ovarian lottery, and being born to wealth or even middle class, I'm more talking about the fact that some people just seem to get breaks and struck by the good kind of lightning while others toil in obscurity.

    That's not saying that getting all the breaks makes you more happy than people who don't, it's just an observation from living a while and observing and questioning.

    It sort of evolved with the political climate and the winners and losers, proclaimed in daily life. The 99 vs 1 percent. The self congratulatory position of people who "made it". The concepts of unfettered capitalism vs socialism. The happiness quotient of other countries who are socialistic being far above countries constantly trying to be rich and or famous.

    As Warren Buffett states, that he is rich because he is extremely lucky. He was born with a head for numbers and nothing he did led to it. Just his talent and the drive he was born with, to manipulate them.

    Not a political rant, just observations.

    YMMV.
    Last edited by blansky; 10-09-2013 at 06:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  5. #95

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,147
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    1
    snip snip snip snip snip


    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    Obviously you have to work at whatever you do, BUT some of this good fortune seems far too pre determined to me to be random.

    Not a political rant, just observations.

    YMMV.
    exactly,

    that is where YMMV come into play ..

    i think it's also called " $hit happens" ?

    you can be the best of anything, and unless
    "it' happens you'll just be what you are ...

    nothing more, nothing less ..

    as he said

    YMMV
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  6. #96

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    704
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Well, from the horses mouth:



    From David Byrne article in today's Guardian - http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...reative-talent
    I know I've posted this exact quote on this very forum before, but it bears repeating. It's a Kurt Vonnegut quote: "Go into the arts. I'm not kidding. The arts are not a way to make a living. They are a very human way of making life more bearable. Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possibly can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."

    In short, it doesn't matter if you're talented or not, or if you're a good salesman or not. Make photos because it's something you enjoy doing, even if nobody else likes your work. You've created something.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  7. #97
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    991
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by ME Super View Post
    I know I've posted this exact quote on this very forum before, but it bears repeating. It's a Kurt Vonnegut quote: "Go into the arts. I'm not kidding. The arts are not a way to make a living. They are a very human way of making life more bearable. Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possibly can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."

    In short, it doesn't matter if you're talented or not, or if you're a good salesman or not. Make photos because it's something you enjoy doing, even if nobody else likes your work. You've created something.
    Thanks ME Super. It pays to read that quote every now and then.

  8. #98

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Near Tavistock, Devon, on the edge of Dartmoor.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,024
    Two egomaniac/narcissistic things that get my goat: a) people whose signature includes a list of the equipment they own (this on another forum but no doubt I'll upset someone here!) and b) declarations/bragging of how much material or how many 'bricks' of film someone has in their freezer (so you've spent some money, so what?)

    Steve
    Dented Halina Paulette, Photax-Paragon 135mm lens, three outdated rolls of Boots Colourslide 2 in the freezer.

  9. #99
    Prest_400's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    I think the main problem is that photography as practiced by the younger generation is almost entirely autobiographical. They've been raised to think exclusively about themselves and their photographs reflect that. Look at the rise of the "selfie" if you need any evidence to this point.

    The thing I love most about photography is that, while working, I'm thinking intensely about the subject. It's a meditation, not an introspection.

    You ask young photographers "what this picture about?" and count how many times the answer starts with "I."

    "I was feeling this...."

    Barf.
    I am from that generation.

    I know a couple of girls in person, who are more or less like this on flickr.
    I would attribute it to the feedback effect you get. Put something, get lots of "nice" comments and "likes", "faves" et al. Photography becomes sort of "shooting for others". And the circle feeds itself, leading into more of this work and feeding the ego as well.

    Agreed on the arts quote. It is becoming one of the insanity asylums I've got to rest my mind.

  10. #100
    MattKrull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    I think the main problem is that photography as practiced by the younger generation is almost entirely autobiographical. They've been raised to think exclusively about themselves and their photographs reflect that. Look at the rise of the "selfie" if you need any evidence to this point.

    The thing I love most about photography is that, while working, I'm thinking intensely about the subject. It's a meditation, not an introspection.
    Firstly, what's wrong with introspection? Meditation, in the buddhist tradition at least, is introspection.

    I guess I'm showing my generation, or maybe just a misunderstanding of what you're implying, but: Photography is partially autobiographical. I can paint a place I've never been, I can sing a song about a life I've never lived, but to photograph a landscape, I have to go there. To take a portrait, I have to interact with the subject. From the focal length and it's effects on features, to the lighting, development choices, to whether the subject is at ease or tense, are all shaped (some more than others) by me. How do you seperate "personal style" from autobiographical influences?

    You use Selfies, the most extreme of autobiographical photos, to illustrate your point. But the selfie isn't new, it's just a one person job now. Before digital cameras allowed us to throw away a half dozen photos getting it right, how many times did a stranger on vacation ask you to take their photo? It still happens to me regularly (but I live in a town frequented by tourists). What's the difference between a selfie and someone asking you to take their photo so they can remember their trip? Granted, 10 years ago, not many people asked me to take a picture of their meal (but I did have an old couple ask me to take their photo in a fancy italian restaurant recently, so that is kind of similar). Again, the zero-cost of taking photos means we (all ages) take pictures of things we wouldn't have considered worth it before.

    I also think the use of selfies is a poor example because it doesn't fall under the categroy of 'art' to me, or any of my friends. It is a snapshot. A pictoral journal entry. No more fine-art than a written journal entry is a short story. When I look at the photographs taken and intended as 'art' by people my age, I see art. I see personal styles. I don't see direct autobiographical journal entries.

    So my question to you is: When you look at the photos of the younger generation: are you looking at their art, or their journals?

Page 10 of 12 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin