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  1. #41
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It's nice to see these things happen. I've always believed in photography being about seeing, and when we switch materials around too much we distract ourselves from truly seeing.

    Thank you.
    I understand and agree with the intent, but for me, this goes into the wrong directionby implying that photography is a hunt. To me making a picture is more creative than finding and taking one.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #42
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I understand and agree with the intent, but for me, this goes into the wrong directionby implying that photography is a hunt. To me making a picture is more creative than finding and taking one.
    I don't usually 'create'. I try to be ready when the picture finds me!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #43
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Also, gear is fun. I think there are a lot of us (certainly I include myself) for which exploring the tools is a significant pleasure in itself. That activity isn't the same as artistic photography, but there's no reason they can't coexist, is there?
    Not at all. I also enjoy cameras as much as I do photography.

  4. #44
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    Not at all. I also enjoy cameras as much as I do photography.
    Perhaps therein lies the difference? If you're only interested in the making of photographs, the camera is of practical utility to record a scene.
    If you have a passion for cameras you add something else to the process that does not directly apply to the making of photographs, so you have more to think about in your process. To me that would be a distraction, perhaps to others that adds to the experience.

    My own approach is that the camera is a box that holds film and the lens lets light through to it. Of course it has to work well and do what it's intended to do, but I don't make a big deal out of lenses and so on. The camera is, to me, the very least important aspect of photography. The only things that really matter to me are to be there to embrace the subject matter when I feel something special is happening, and to bring that moment to the print.
    Everything else along the way is just a tool that I try to make as invisible as possible to the process, so that I don't have to think about it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #45
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    OK, how about - Photography is probably the easiest medium to produce stuff, but the most difficult medium in which to produce stuff, worthy enough to stick on a wall next to other stuff in an empty building.
    I think you nailed it.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #46
    blansky's Avatar
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    The responses to this thread are interesting.

    Imagine a group of photographers getting together once a month to shoot, and have a rotating leader picking the theme.

    So he says, today, one camera, one lens etc etc.

    And they start to object.

    "I want all my lenses"

    "Horses for courses"

    " I don't need a camera and lens, I can already SEE the shot"

    "Why should I restrict myself"

    "I'm not going with you guys hunting, I'll wait here for the shot to come to me".

    "But I'll miss 90% of my shots"

    "Fuck this, you guys go ahead, I'm gonna go buy some more gear"
    Last edited by blansky; 12-20-2013 at 10:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #47
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    What a great summary! Got a good laugh out of that. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    "I'm not going with you guys hunting, I'll wait here for the shot to come to me".
    I think that one was pointed in my direction, (and it is funny); maybe I didn't explain myself well...

    My philosophy is that my photographs will not be good until I encounter a situation, emotion, or some thing that affects me emotionally. So if I work with someone for a portrait, I will visit a couple of locations, work with getting the right composition, work on lighting, and so on, but there has to be some sort of emotional reaction for me to want to trip the shutter. It's kind of like having a conversation, and it can be awkward at first, but after a while some common ground is found, and an interesting topic is discovered. Or like all of a sudden having a good idea.
    That's when I want to be able to react, and to be prepared for taking the shot, so that I don't miss it. If I use a camera that I know inside out, and can operate without thinking, then I am likely to be able to make something out of that moment. If I have to fiddle with settings and think about what I'm doing, I'm likely to miss it.

    It's about being prepared for the moment when it strikes, and to be observant and recognize when the magic happens.

    It is definitely not about just 'waiting' for something to happen. It is about working hard and putting in lots of effort, and when you do, eventually something good happens and the shot comes to me.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #48
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    What a great summary! Got a good laugh out of that. Thanks.



    I think that one was pointed in my direction, (and it is funny); maybe I didn't explain myself well...

    My philosophy is that my photographs will not be good until I encounter a situation, emotion, or some thing that affects me emotionally. So if I work with someone for a portrait, I will visit a couple of locations, work with getting the right composition, work on lighting, and so on, but there has to be some sort of emotional reaction for me to want to trip the shutter. It's kind of like having a conversation, and it can be awkward at first, but after a while some common ground is found, and an interesting topic is discovered. Or like all of a sudden having a good idea.
    That's when I want to be able to react, and to be prepared for taking the shot, so that I don't miss it. If I use a camera that I know inside out, and can operate without thinking, then I am likely to be able to make something out of that moment. If I have to fiddle with settings and think about what I'm doing, I'm likely to miss it.

    It's about being prepared for the moment when it strikes, and to be observant and recognize when the magic happens.

    It is definitely not about just 'waiting' for something to happen. It is about working hard and putting in lots of effort, and when you do, eventually something good happens and the shot comes to me.
    I get that.

    But the blog was really a self imposed exercise.

    He wanted to discipline himself to certain parameters to test himself and to see if he could learn something.

    Obviously his time frame is more than most would confine themselves to but that's up to you.

    It was basically a self teaching experiment and he apparently benefited from it.

    Obviously when we go out to take pictures we want all our tools, but he forced himself to not have them, and then forced himself to re-adjust his thinking.

    The old, outside the box thing.
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  9. #49
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    The responses to this thread are interesting.

    Imagine a group of photographers getting together once a month to shoot, and have a rotating leader picking the theme.

    So he says, today, one camera, one lens etc etc.

    And they start to object.

    "I want all my lenses"

    "Horses for courses"

    " I don't need a camera and lens, I can already SEE the shot"

    "Why should I restrict myself"

    "I'm not going with you guys hunting, I'll wait here for the shot to come to me".

    "But I'll miss 90% of my shots"

    "Fuck this, you guys go ahead, I'm gonna go buy some more gear"

    LMAO!
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

    APUG Portfolio

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    "I'm not going with you guys hunting, I'll wait here for the shot to come to me".
    I agree with Thomas; this scenario is great. And apt.

    To be clear, I think there's a lot of value to working within constraints, and on any given day I'm likely to be using one camera, one or maybe two lenses, one pair of eyes, and so on. I might change from slow to fast film as evening comes on, or whatever. In the big picture, too much fiddling with toys is definitely a distraction.

    But the reason we have different tools is, well, because there are different jobs for them. I'd generally prefer to use LF for landscapes and still-lifes, something light for travel photography, a fast lens and fast film indoors or at night, and so on; so would you, dear reader, wouldn't you? (Mutatis mutandis for particular people's preferences; maybe you don't like still life, or what-have-you. But you know what I mean.)

    And with that in mind, I'm a little skeptical about the idea that "one of everything" is somehow an intrinsically superior way to photograph, especially over a long period. For many people, I'd think that "only a few options" is more of a sweet spot, both for learning and for image production.

    I hunt for images, but I do it as an ambush predator, like an anglerfish or a Pac-Man frog.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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