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  1. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    Agreed, and Press photographers used to use Speed Graphics and flash bulbs. Ansel Adams would have been hard pressed to cover a Sporting event with his view camera.
    True, although they were used for such events in their day. You could make a fair argument that sports photography (fast follow autofocus, high shutter speeds, autowind, etc) dominated the design of SLRs in their last twenty years and continues to influence DSLR thinking to the exclusion other priorities. Those wanting a more targeted camera were forced to look elsewhere.

    The question that might be asked is what advantage do readers of this forum believe film offers over digital photography. Whatever the answer, I doubt it involves more automation in the equation.

  2. #112

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    To add one more point, I just came back from walking the dog over the hills taking photographs on one of the latest mirrorless digital cameras. It finally succeeded in the promise that has been hyped for the last twenty years, of taking sharp, well saturated, grain free images at silly ISOs. I manually set the aperture and shutter speed, put the ISO on auto and keeping a thumb ready on the exposure comp dial, allow the camera to do its thing. No more choosing to freeze the action or get depth of field, I can have both, with no IQ compromises. Great for sports!

    On the other hand sharp images of peerless image quality are only a small part of my photography. Feel, mood, process are more important, which is why film makes up most of my image making.

  3. #113

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    The photographer should be automatic, not the camera!

  4. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    True, although they were used for such events in their day. You could make a fair argument that sports photography (fast follow autofocus, high shutter speeds, autowind, etc) dominated the design of SLRs in their last twenty years and continues to influence DSLR thinking to the exclusion other priorities. Those wanting a more targeted camera were forced to look elsewhere.

    The question that might be asked is what advantage do readers of this forum believe film offers over digital photography. Whatever the answer, I doubt it involves more automation in the equation.
    This thread title does not seem to be - is automation is good or bad or is film camera automation good or bad,

    But
    =====
    Thread: Is using the camera in manual that difficult.
    =====

    No is it is not difficult, you preset the camera in the coffee shop like it was a Box Brownie, (though it may be more difficult doing that with a F5 or Dcamera,) and change it when the light changes or you need to prefocus to a different range.

    But

    If you have an attention problem or are clumsy then any film camera is going to be harder work than a Dcamera. Some people cannot load a Barnack easily, or a spiral tank reel... Memory cards are easier.

    Last summer some of the photo shops organized a photo shoot long weekend, loaning a 35mm manual camera, for a quick spin around the block, a free film - FP4+, and when camera was returned, developed and contacted printed, enlarged the best one and stuck it on the wall. They had some nice cameras, like a Praktica LTL.

    It was so popular for intervals they had a queue of people waiting for a camera to be returned.

    And some of the hung shots were good although the shooters had had the film loaded and the wind on lever explained, and the exposure meter etc. just before they were pushed out on the street. So many people can use a manual camera easily, but a % may need an auto DSLR to be enabled.

    The camera does not take the photographs...

  5. #115
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    This discussion should have ended after 3 simple replies that everyone could agree upon:

    Is a using a camera in manual that difficult?

    1: No.

    2. No, if you know what you're doing.

    3. Yes, if you don't understand what the relationship between meter/estimate of EV, settings on the camera, and desired aesthetic is.

    I love my M2, I love my Hasselblads, I love my auto-capable F3/F4s, and I love my Contax T2 and Olympus stylus. Whatever.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  6. #116

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    Most people pick up the idea of exposing film correctly in a couple of weeks. A few do not, and SLR design evolved to accommodate them. It also changed to allow people with very specific needs to fulfil those needs. Then it evolved to let people who just like fooling round with cameras to have fun doing so. After that it grew to do all of the above while it was raining, at 10 fps, while shooting flash. Some people believe this is A Thoroughly Good Thing. Other people think it has little to do with photography.

    If you're in the good thing camp, you'll love modern DSLRs. You could spend a day playing with the thousands of combinations without troubling to get out the house to take a shot.

  7. #117

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    Suggest you are on the wrong fora this is APUG.

    The OP had a query you are not acknowledging are you a politician for a living?

    Is it difficult to use a manual camera?

  8. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xmas View Post
    Suggest you are on the wrong fora this is APUG.

    The OP had a query you are not acknowledging are you a politician for a living?

    Is it difficult to use a manual camera?
    Explain with examples. Everything I've said is pertinent to the ease of using a manual camera, and the absurd attempts manufacturers went to to 're-imagine' it was difficult.

  9. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    ... and the absurd attempts manufacturers went to to 're-imagine' it was difficult.
    Are you sure that what you write is a true statement of the design intent for camera automation?

  10. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Are you sure that what you write is a true statement of the design intent for camera automation?
    The intent of camera manufacturers is to sell more cameras, by whatever means necessary. Is technical innovation a good idea? Sometimes, but by the 1990s SLR design was lead by gimmickry, in my humble opinion. Remember the (Minolta?) system for which you had to purchase different cards for various modes? Some people get off on that kind of thing, and it certainly keeps manufacturers in business, though it clearly wasn't enough to save Minolta from Canon-Nikon market domination.

    What the resurgence of film photography among younger people illustrates, is that simple tools (whoever thought the Zenit would become a cult classic?) are perfectly usable, and are often preferred for their simplicity. They may not be the choice of the people who are disagreeing with my premise, but the popularity of solid, even primitive SLR cameras has not restricted the creative vision of newcomers, and probably never did. Those limitations were in their own head, and manufacturers pandered to the gap with new tricks.



 

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