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  1. #61
    Nikanon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Metering is no different.
    Every form of metering and setting exposure takes practice to master, we need to figure out what the exceptions and limitations are and how to deal with them. The tools/features built into our cameras are very reliable and very predictable. Again there is no extra point of error, we either understand the tool we are using or we don't.
    When a Canon DSLR fails to focus on the point assigned by the photographer to be focused on because there is an electronic or mechanical failure of the contrast information as relayed to the focus drive, then this is computer error. It happens quite a bit in any kind of autofocus system.

  2. #62
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    Nikanon, that failure is just a characteristic, a limitation of auto focus systems not an electronic or mechanical failure.

    When we know where and why this happens we can work around it, same thing happens with Nikons and ... It is really tough for humans to focus on low contrast/low texture/very dark/very bright surfaces too. Try focussing a 4x5 camera on the side of a sand dune on an overcast day.

    I believe that situations such as these are one reason why many small format lenses have focus distance marks.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #63

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    Just last night I had to override the autofocus on my SLR to get a picture of my son on his bicycle that he got for his birthday. Fortunately I've used manual focus before, so I knew what to expect and how to do it. Also fortunately, there was enough light that I could see what I was doing. I really only have trouble focusing when I don't have enough light, which happens often enough that I find autofocus to be a blessing in my picture taking. I like having a camera that let's me focus on getting the picture I want, yet can step aside when I want full control. Full auto, aperture priority, shutter priority, and manual modes give me that ability.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  4. #64
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Actually, I don't see any difference between setting everything manually and using an AE camera that gives you speed and aperture readings in the viewfinder, and an exposure lock feature. It gives all the information that you would get by manually doing things, and does it it a lot faster.
    I consider it to be just a different method of manual control.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikanon View Post
    There is nothing difficult about using a camera in manual, not unless the lens is difficult to turn or the camera is difficult to lift, it's not difficult. The brain power is not substituting the computer, it's the reverse...

    If anything it is much more complex to get a desired result when haggling with an unintelligent machine.
    You may be young, but you really get it.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Nikanon, that failure is just a characteristic, a limitation of auto focus systems not an electronic or mechanical failure.
    No, there really have been *bugs* of that nature in Canon's AF firmware on one or two occasions. I remember experiencing the problem where the 70-200/4L would focus behind where it said it was focussed on some of the early d*g*t*l bodies. If I remember correctly, it affected the confirmation LED in manual focus too.

    I guess it's possible to quibble about whether that's a "failure" or just a "limitation", but for practical purposes, when the system doesn't do what it says on the tin and what the feedback loop to the user says it's doing, I'd consider that a failure. But I don't think it has much to do with automatic vs. manual; it's the same kind of failure as "the rangefinder is off" or "the ground glass plane isn't perfect".

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #67
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbromaghin View Post
    As others have said above, use good equipment and you will get good pictures. If you want to expand beyond that, you better know what you're doing because your brain has to substitute for all that electronic brain power. Do you know more than a computer? Good luck, buddy.
    "All that electronic brain power" is not necessary, unless you want the machine to do all the work. Yes, I do know more than a computer, because I know what I want and I know how to get it. For all the sophistication of modern camera meters, they still choose just one shutter speed and one aperture value. Photographers had been doing that long before any kind of evaluative metering or any automation at all. Not all of them would choose the same exposure in the same situation, especially with B&W. A simple meter, together with some knowledge and experience and solid technique, is all it takes to get consistently good exposures. You will begin to find that you can determine a lot of your exposures without any meter at all. With experience, you should be able to look at a scene and say what f-stop and shutter speed you will use. With careful metering, you might refine that estimate some, but you will have gotten very close.
    To answer your question; yes, using a camera in manual mode is that difficult. But it is very rewarding. It's how I work almost all the time, but I screw up a lot.
    Understand what you're doing and why, and get a solid repeatable technique down, and your screwups will greatly diminish. I suggest you carry a gray card and use it to determine your manual settings. Or meter off your palm and increase a stop from that reading. That will get you spot-on or damn close. When I started metering that way my keeper rate as to exposure, with transparency film, became very high. With more experience it increased even more, to the point where I could go a little more or less to get just what I was after. With negative film, especially these days, that degree of accuracy isn't as critical. But not so long ago, I always exposed 100 ISO color negative differently from 100 ISO color positive film, to get the results I preferred and play to the film's strengths.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #68
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    It is never the camera, or the meter, or the fancy computer in them, that screws up.

    As long as our cameras/meters are in good repair and have full batteries where needed, we only have ourselves to blame.
    I strongly disagree. My neighbor has a Canon DSLR, and she can tell you exactly when it will screw up. Most of the time the evaluative metering does a good job. But if her subject is in deep shade but with something fairly bright in the background, it will expose way dark. A plain old center-weighted meter would give a much better result. And while it normally focuses accurately, I took a picture of her little boy looking over a wall, and though the illuminated focus indicator was square on the kid's forehead, the wall surface below his head and 12 inches or so closer was what the camera decided to put in sharp focus.
    Last edited by lxdude; 01-27-2014 at 04:05 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #69
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky View Post
    I DO, I DO.....I remember it well.

    It's when you sneak up on a girl from behind, reach around her with both hands, locate her soft inviting perky targets .........and whammo, you double clutch.
    And then I woke up. Literally. On the ground with a swollen nose and a throbbing eye socket. I guess I just don't have your charm.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #70
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    double de-clutching surely?
    or perhaps it was called differently in the US
    In the US it's called double clutching.

    Though Blansky has called it Double-D clutching, I'm sure.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.



 

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