Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,706   Posts: 1,548,488   Online: 963
      
Page 8 of 15 FirstFirst ... 234567891011121314 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 149
  1. #71
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,662
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    what's an exposure triangle?
    It's one side of an exposure pyramid. You assemble the exposure pyramid out of exposure triangles and put it on your head, and through the magic of pyramid power, you instantly know the correct exposure!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #72
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,757
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    My neighbor has a Canon digital, and she can tell you exactly when it will screw up.
    This is a good example of the point I'm trying to make.

    I'd hazard a guess that your neighbors camera might even be working "exactly as Canon programmed it".

    It is likely that the real problem is that Canon's engineers just didn't get things as "right" as they could have, so there is a flaw in the design. Luckily for us (and I'm using that term very loosely), machines don't normally screw up, for better or worse machines normally do exactly what they are designed to do and they do it exactly the same way every time. Machines in good repair are predictable.

    Conversely, when something breaks, or when I screw up, something random happens; the result isn't predictable.

    This is nothing new, one thing or another has always frustrated us about every camera or meter or lens or film or flash or whatever. Learning the quirks/characteristics of the tools in our hands has always be part of photography, it has always been the photographer's job to make it work; automation hasn't changed that role.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 01-27-2014 at 07:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #73
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,662
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post

    when something breaks, or when I screw up, something random happens; the result isn't predictable.
    The difference, as I see it, is between faults and characteristics. Any spot, limited area, center-weighted, or full averaging meter will behave characteristically of its type, regardless of what camera it is in. No AF system can know for sure which of multiple AF points is on the area of desired sharpest focus, so it must be told if that deviates from what would be most likely. That is a characteristic of all multi-point AF systems, though they may vary one to the next in what they choose, which the user must learn.

    But when a lens does not focus where it is told, or when the meter blows exposure so badly in certain situations that the photographer can only learn about it the hard way, i.e., it is not characteristic of all systems of that type, that's a fault.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #74
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,757
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    lxdude I do agree that there are badly designed tools available to us, that is nothing new.

    Once the defect is found though we are back to the photographer being the place the buck stops.

    Your neighbor, if it was bought new through most any retailer, has/or had the choice of 1) returning the camera for money or repair when the problem was found, or 2) putting up with the problem.

    If they chose #2 ...
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #75
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    543
    Lxdude,

    Actually, the Canon eye control cameras could tell which AF Point you wanted. Worked better if you did not wear glasses, and re-calibrated from time to time.

    I like having all the bells and whistles available, as long as I can turn them off when not needed or wanted.

    The one really good use I can think of for a digic@m, is to learn to estimate light. Put it in manual. And you have instant feedback. If it takes you a hundred shots to get your estimates on target, no problem. Then go back to the film camera armed with a few skills. Or... Just shoot the film, and help keep the market going. ;-). Think of it like tuition...

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  6. #76

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,459
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    *snip*

    But if you want to talk muscle and brain power... I can't use modern DSLRs because I don't seem to have either the muscle or brain power to press all of those buttons and scroll through all of those menus. Or maybe I just can't be bothered by trying to control a camera that way.
    That's just it. I have only to look at two settings and the viewfinder/groundglass. Anything more is needless clutter to me.

  7. #77
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,662
    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    Lxdude,

    Actually, the Canon eye control cameras could tell which AF Point you wanted. Worked better if you did not wear glasses, and re-calibrated from time to time.
    Oh yeah, huh... forgot.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  8. #78

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    Thanks everyone!
    I really have no problem with automation because I know at times we simply don't have the few seconds to make the settings manually. Automation is there for us to use.
    I don't have any problem either if one would rely on automation all the time and have no desire to make the settings manually ever.
    What I was saying is that for a beginner and if this person at some point in his/her future would wish to use manual controls then it's much easier to start with manual. I have seen many posts in the internet forum (may be I spent way to much time reading them) that someone is asking on how to start using manual controls on their cameras. I have never seen anyone saying that they started out using manual and now they need advice on how to make use of the automation available on their cameras. For a beginner I don't think composition and any artistic aspect is important to them because before they even buy the camera they already know what kind of pictures they want to take and that's the reason why they bought the camera to begin with. It's the people who have practiced photography for a while would need to start concentrate on the artistic aspect. Like I said spending about 1/2 hour to learn how to focus the camera and set the exposure is all it takes. At this point they won't be able to get results any better than if they put the camera on auto but the can get the same result, spending a little time, but what they gain is the understanding of how the camera works.

  9. #79
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    543
    The big thing is learning to see like the camera. We all have an image in our head when we release the shutter. If we know how the camera sees it, and how to adjust for that, we will come away much happier.

    When I first started, I was always disappointed because my images looked nothing like what I saw. The best advice I ever got was, "It does not matter what you see, it matters what your camera sees. Learn to see how your camera sees."


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  10. #80
    Joey Anchors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Philadelphia, Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    19
    Images
    2
    I started doing photography about 9 years ago, and have always used old cameras no newer than 1953. So to use a camera that A) requires a battery and B) has some sort of auto setting/menu I have no idea how to use it.
    Its weird to think of a photographier who doesn't understand how to use a simple manual camera.

    p.s. I am 35 so I should know how to use a digital camera!

Page 8 of 15 FirstFirst ... 234567891011121314 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin