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  1. #71
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    lxdude I do agree that there are badly designed tools available to us, that is nothing new.

    Once the defect is found though we are back to the photographer being the place the buck stops.

    Your neighbor, if it was bought new through most any retailer, has/or had the choice of 1) returning the camera for money or repair when the problem was found, or 2) putting up with the problem.

    If they chose #2 ...
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #72
    ambaker's Avatar
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    Lxdude,

    Actually, the Canon eye control cameras could tell which AF Point you wanted. Worked better if you did not wear glasses, and re-calibrated from time to time.

    I like having all the bells and whistles available, as long as I can turn them off when not needed or wanted.

    The one really good use I can think of for a digic@m, is to learn to estimate light. Put it in manual. And you have instant feedback. If it takes you a hundred shots to get your estimates on target, no problem. Then go back to the film camera armed with a few skills. Or... Just shoot the film, and help keep the market going. ;-). Think of it like tuition...

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  3. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    *snip*

    But if you want to talk muscle and brain power... I can't use modern DSLRs because I don't seem to have either the muscle or brain power to press all of those buttons and scroll through all of those menus. Or maybe I just can't be bothered by trying to control a camera that way.
    That's just it. I have only to look at two settings and the viewfinder/groundglass. Anything more is needless clutter to me.

  4. #74
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    Lxdude,

    Actually, the Canon eye control cameras could tell which AF Point you wanted. Worked better if you did not wear glasses, and re-calibrated from time to time.
    Oh yeah, huh... forgot.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #75

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    Thanks everyone!
    I really have no problem with automation because I know at times we simply don't have the few seconds to make the settings manually. Automation is there for us to use.
    I don't have any problem either if one would rely on automation all the time and have no desire to make the settings manually ever.
    What I was saying is that for a beginner and if this person at some point in his/her future would wish to use manual controls then it's much easier to start with manual. I have seen many posts in the internet forum (may be I spent way to much time reading them) that someone is asking on how to start using manual controls on their cameras. I have never seen anyone saying that they started out using manual and now they need advice on how to make use of the automation available on their cameras. For a beginner I don't think composition and any artistic aspect is important to them because before they even buy the camera they already know what kind of pictures they want to take and that's the reason why they bought the camera to begin with. It's the people who have practiced photography for a while would need to start concentrate on the artistic aspect. Like I said spending about 1/2 hour to learn how to focus the camera and set the exposure is all it takes. At this point they won't be able to get results any better than if they put the camera on auto but the can get the same result, spending a little time, but what they gain is the understanding of how the camera works.

  6. #76
    ambaker's Avatar
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    The big thing is learning to see like the camera. We all have an image in our head when we release the shutter. If we know how the camera sees it, and how to adjust for that, we will come away much happier.

    When I first started, I was always disappointed because my images looked nothing like what I saw. The best advice I ever got was, "It does not matter what you see, it matters what your camera sees. Learn to see how your camera sees."


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  7. #77
    Joey Anchors's Avatar
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    I started doing photography about 9 years ago, and have always used old cameras no newer than 1953. So to use a camera that A) requires a battery and B) has some sort of auto setting/menu I have no idea how to use it.
    Its weird to think of a photographier who doesn't understand how to use a simple manual camera.

    p.s. I am 35 so I should know how to use a digital camera!

  8. #78
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've had cameras with automatic features, but leave everything in manual most of the time. Aside from having more direct control over the factors that make the image (DOF, chosing to stop motion or register motion, etc.), in manual, I can think about exposure in pretty much the same way with any camera (adding in bellows factor for large format), which I see as easier.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #79
    MartinCrabtree's Avatar
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    When I have to get a shot it's on program with exposure comp preset for whatever film I'm using. Manual otherwise. I started with a manual 35MM that has (yep,still got it) match needle metering and went from there. I even use manual focus glass on my digital cameras. And they get used just like the film cameras. You oughta see the looks I get with a digital camera in one hand and my Weston Master II in the other.

  10. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinCrabtree View Post
    When I have to get a shot it's on program with exposure comp preset for whatever film I'm using. Manual otherwise. I started with a manual 35MM that has (yep,still got it) match needle metering and went from there. I even use manual focus glass on my digital cameras. And they get used just like the film cameras. You oughta see the looks I get with a digital camera in one hand and my Weston Master II in the other.
    Good on you, man. Here's for using the brain!
    “You seek escape from pain. We seek the achievement of happiness. You exist for the sake of avoiding punishment. We exist for the sake of earning rewards. Threats will not make us function; fear is not our incentive. It is not death that we wish to avoid, but life that we wish to live.” - John Galt

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