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  1. #81
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    yes, but often, they are not even words. Like alot.


    Steve.
    A lot allot 'alot' for 'a lot' a lot.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Yes. That and allot seem to have become acceptable versions of a lot.


    Steve.
    and all this time i thought it was all ot ..

    i am so looking forward to

    the lame footed
    balloonman whistling
    far an wee

  3. #83
    AgX
    AgX is offline

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    Ok, song is over, back to word bashing:

    Rollie

  4. #84

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  5. #85
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laser View Post
    CHEMISTRY

    CHEMISTRY is the name of a science. CHEMICALS are the materials that are used.
    This.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kawaiithulhu View Post
    And according to the Oxford University dictionary, "Soup" is an accepted use for chemicals used in photography.

    Just do like me and learn to love language, etymology, and roll with the punches
    And I don't care what Oxford says, "soup" is even worse.

  6. #86
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    "Beautiful photograph, you must have a really nice camera."


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    My wife is a writer. I use the analogy (she likes this observation) that this is like saying, "nice poem, you must have a really good computer/tablet/pencil and pad." Well actually she has a mechanical typewriter too. Doesn't really use it, but loves it.

  7. #87
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I read all nine pages and I'm surprised no one mentioned "silver gelatine print."

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawaiithulhu View Post
    And according to the Oxford University dictionary, "Soup" is an accepted use for chemicals used in photography.

    Just do like me and learn to love language, etymology, and roll with the punches
    maybe, butsometimes,I like to pass some out first.sorry
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #89
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    You guys need to drink more beerand clillax a bit.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I read all nine pages and I'm surprised no one mentioned "silver gelatine print."
    The first time I came across this phrase was in a photography gallery in the 1970s. Initially finding it pretentious, I then reasoned that one of the few places where the term was legitimate was a photographic gallery, as they'd also be selling prints made by various non-silver historical processes. Contemporary use of Victorian and Edwardian technology was almost unheard of in the 70s, and now it sums up the majority of non-digital photographs, so I reluctantly admit 'silver gelatine print' as part of the photographic lexicon, failing a better explanation.



 

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